Literary Classics Collection

Discuss North American DVDs and Blu-rays or other DVD and Blu-ray-related topics.
Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
souvenir
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 12:20 pm

#1 Post by souvenir » Wed Nov 08, 2006 8:54 pm

DVD Times has cover art for this upcoming release. It will be available on March 6, 2007 and include Billy Budd, Captain Horatio Hornblower, Madame Bovary (1949), The Prisoner of Zenda (1937 & 1952 Double Feature), and The Three Musketeers (1948). Each will also be available separately.

User avatar
htdm
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 3:46 am

#2 Post by htdm » Wed Nov 08, 2006 9:08 pm

Excellent post! I've been waiting for Prisoner of Zenda for years! Don't think I'll be picking up the others however.

User avatar
tryavna
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2005 4:38 pm
Location: North Carolina

#3 Post by tryavna » Wed Nov 08, 2006 9:37 pm

souvenir wrote:The Prisoner of Zenda (1937 & 1952 Double Feature)
I remember that, during the last HTF-Warners chat, they were talking about including the silent 1922 version as well (for a triple feature). Looks like Warners is issuing yet another slap in the face to fans of their silents library. Wonder if they'll actually ever release any of that stuff....

I guess specs aren't up yet, so I might end up being pleasantly surprised. But I really wish more consumers would call Warners on this instead of fawning over them year after year. (Sorry to sound so bitter, but this strikes me as a wonderful opportunity that they've just pissed away.)

User avatar
What A Disgrace
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2004 10:34 pm
Contact:

#4 Post by What A Disgrace » Wed Nov 08, 2006 10:38 pm

I have to agree with tryavna, and I have to admit that every time I see the number of posts in this board change, I rush here in excitement, thinking that there will be announcements regarding silent Lubitsch, more Lon Chaney, a King Vidor Signature Collection, or a Lilian Gish collection...at long last! Tonight, we discover that Rex Ingram's film isn't a priority amongst the Prisoner of Zendas.

Or maybe they're planning a Terry/Ingram set.

Eclisse
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2005 3:29 pm

#5 Post by Eclisse » Thu Nov 09, 2006 11:02 am

Actually I never watched any of these movies.But I'm curious,looking forward to it.(at least a rent) Raoul Walsh,Vincent Minnelli....I kinda like these people.Though I know Minnelli was capable,at times,to produce some of the most boring things ever.

Tom Peeping
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 1:32 pm
Location: Paris
Contact:

#6 Post by Tom Peeping » Thu Nov 09, 2006 2:06 pm

To me, this is one of the news of the year. I've been waiting for Bovary and Three Musketeers since the DVD format came out. The breaking of the windows scene in Bovary, Milady de Winter' s demise in Musketeers... I am walking on air.

shearerchic
Joined: Mon May 08, 2006 12:45 am

#7 Post by shearerchic » Thu Nov 09, 2006 10:02 pm

well i'm hoping too that the '22 version of Zenda is on the DVD. i'll wail till we get the full specs.

User avatar
Matt
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 12:58 pm

#8 Post by Matt » Thu Nov 09, 2006 10:20 pm

shearerchic wrote:well i'm hoping too that the '22 version of Zenda is on the DVD. i'll wail till we get the full specs.
3 feature films (at approx. 320 minutes altogether) will be too much to squeeze onto one disc, but I'll maintain hope as well.

I was kind of hoping for "Swashbucklers" set that would include the three Zendas and a double dose of Scaramouche. And The Scarlet Pimpernel.

shearerchic
Joined: Mon May 08, 2006 12:45 am

#9 Post by shearerchic » Fri Nov 10, 2006 3:20 am

Matt wrote:3 feature films (at approx. 320 minutes altogether) will be too much to squeeze onto one disc, but I'll maintain hope as well.

I was kind of hoping for "Swashbucklers" set that would include the three Zendas and a double dose of Scaramouche. And The Scarlet Pimpernel.
Even so if it was a double sided disc??

User avatar
Gordon
Waster of Cinema
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2004 8:03 am

#10 Post by Gordon » Fri Nov 10, 2006 4:37 am

Wow, great line-up! And Billy Budd from Warner? You beauty! My expectations for a DVD were slim, so this is great news for Melvillians.

User avatar
Matt
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 12:58 pm

#11 Post by Matt » Fri Nov 10, 2006 10:27 am

shearerchic wrote:Even so if it was a double sided disc??
But Warners rarely (if ever) do double-sided discs anymore.

User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#12 Post by Lino » Mon Dec 04, 2006 9:59 am

Full specs are now up. Shorts, commentaries and trailers will be provided on all discs and apart from The Three Musketeers (which comes with Portuguese too), only English subs for the feature will be made available.

Maybe they know I'm a Gene Kelly fan. Jokes apart, you can't help admit that it's kind of odd that Warner ditched Spanish and French subs altogether on their upcoming DVD editions. I wonder what made them do that.

User avatar
Matt
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 12:58 pm

#13 Post by Matt » Mon Dec 04, 2006 12:46 pm

I've noticed that Warners will cut corners on some releases they think might not be big sellers. Note, for example, how the discs in the Berkeley collection have only a black title on the disc instead of the usual 4-color, full-label silkscreen. Or the reversible cover art in the new Maltese Falcon set (which, though it's a big title, is still a double-dip). Reducing the number of subtitle translations available is probably another way of doing that, even though I think it's a bad thing not to put at least Spanish subtitles on every DVD released in the US.

User avatar
Gordon
Waster of Cinema
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2004 8:03 am

#14 Post by Gordon » Mon Dec 04, 2006 1:44 pm

Commentary by Terence Stamp and filmmaker Steven Soderbergh on Billy Budd? Wow! The cinematographer on the film was the great Robert Krasker (Brief Encounter, Odd Man Out, The Third Man,The Criminal) and this, in fact, was his last black and white feature film and the film itself is one of the last great examples of classical monochrome cinematography, yet it wasn't even nominated and in 1963, you still had the seperate catergory for bw cinematography, for which Birdman of Alcatraz (Burnett Guffey), To Kill a Mockingbird (Russell Harlan), Two for the Seesaw (Ted McCord), What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (Ernest Haller) were nominated and The Longest Day (Jean Bourgoin and Walter Wottitz) won. Mind you, Ossie Morris wasn't nominated for Lolita, nor was Sam Leavitt for Cape Fear, Edmond Richard for The Trial or Walter Lassally for The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner. Great year for cinematography - both color and bw!

Anyway, it will be great to hear what Stamp and Soderbergh have to say about this masterful film, long overdue on home video in its OAR.

Tom Peeping
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 1:32 pm
Location: Paris
Contact:

#15 Post by Tom Peeping » Mon Dec 04, 2006 3:56 pm

Out here in France, most of movie and DVD lovers are really upset that Warner decided to drop French subtitles on their future releases. It looks like most of French cinephiles were buying too many of their DVDs online and R1...

User avatar
starmanof51
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 3:28 am
Location: Seattleish
Contact:

#16 Post by starmanof51 » Mon Dec 04, 2006 4:39 pm

Seems like a lot to fit on one dual layer disc for "Prisoner of Zenda"

User avatar
Gordon
Waster of Cinema
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2004 8:03 am

#17 Post by Gordon » Mon Dec 04, 2006 4:49 pm

Tom Peeping wrote:Out here in France, most of movie and DVD lovers are really upset that Warner decided to drop French subtitles on their future releases. It looks like most of French cinephiles were buying too many of their DVDs online and R1...
Eh? That's crazy. What about their French-Canadian customers?

The Prisoner of Zenda disc might be a DVD-10 or DVD-14 (101 mins and 96 mins) like the Jekyll & Hide disc.

Grapevine Video released the 1922 version of Zenda on DVD: Click here to order. I have no idea of the quality.

User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#18 Post by Lino » Fri Mar 02, 2007 3:53 pm

DVDBeaver reviews Billy Budd and Captain Horatio Hornblower.

User avatar
Gordon
Waster of Cinema
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2004 8:03 am

#19 Post by Gordon » Tue Mar 06, 2007 6:35 pm

Billy Budd was a revelation in its original CinemaScope framing. Robert Ryan is astounding - I can't believe he wasn't nominated for an Oscar. Immensely powerful film, excellent in every department and as I said, it was a joy to finally gain an appreciation of Robert Krasker's exemplary black and white CinemaScope cinematography. As for Ustinov, one wishes that he had directed more straight dramas and less comedies. I have only listened to about ten minutes of the commentary, but sounds as good as the Soderbergh-Mike Nichols tracks.

User avatar
kinjitsu
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2005 1:39 pm
Location: Uffa!

#20 Post by kinjitsu » Tue Mar 06, 2007 6:50 pm

Gordon wrote:I can't believe he wasn't nominated for an Oscar
Nick Adams and Bobby Darin were Oscar nominees that year, if you can believe that. At least BAFTA had the intelligence to nominate him for Best Foreign Actor, although he lost to Burt Lancaster.

Feast on me
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2005 5:13 am

#21 Post by Feast on me » Tue Mar 06, 2007 7:20 pm

Matt wrote:I think it's a bad thing not to put at least Spanish subtitles on every DVD released in the US.
I can attest that this is indeed a bad idea, my dad speaks English and can understand it well, but since his (and mine) first language is Spanish he prefers to understand the film completely rather than miss the meaning of slang or sayings that are much more prevalent in films than native English speakers notice.

So if a DVD doesn't have Spanish subtitles he thinks twice before buying them. And he only does if it's one of his favorites.

My mom loves seeing movies with me but is annoyed that Criterion DVDs only have English subtitles, since she understands very few words of English. She only sees Italian films with me since it is close enough to Spanish that she understands the basics of the movie and only asks me about what a character said if she gets lost.

And many of my parent's friends hate not having films subtitled and refuse too buy them, the Latino market is growing and it seems idiotic not to include at least Spanish and French Subtitles on all DVDs.

Maybe another thread on this subject should be made to discuss this further.

User avatar
Gordon
Waster of Cinema
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2004 8:03 am

#22 Post by Gordon » Tue Mar 06, 2007 8:04 pm

kinjitsu wrote:
Gordon wrote:I can't believe he wasn't nominated for an Oscar
Nick Adams and Bobby Darin were Oscar nominees that year, if you can believe that. At least BAFTA had the intelligence to nominate him for Best Foreign Actor, although he lost to Burt Lancaster.
No - the noms for the 1963 Oscars were:

Best Actor in a Leading Role

Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) - Burt Lancaster
Days of Wine and Roses (1962) - Jack Lemmon
Divorzio all'italiana (1961) - Marcello Mastroianni
Lawrence of Arabia (1962) - Peter O'Toole

Winner: To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) - Gregory Peck

Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Billy Budd (1962) - Terence Stamp
Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) - Telly Savalas
Lawrence of Arabia (1962) - Omar Sharif
What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) - Victor Buono

Winner: Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) - Ed Begley

But, I agree that the 1964 awards were also screwy - even though I am fan of Bobby Darin - as Dirk Bogarde should have been nominated for The Servant. And how could Hud not have been nominated for Best Picture? It was for Best Director, Best Actor in a Leading Role (Paul Newman), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Melvyn Douglas, who won), Best Actress in a Leading Role (Patricia Neal, who won) and Best Black and White Cinematography (James Wong Howe, who won). Tom Jones is a terrible film, in my humble opinion.

Anyway. Robert Ryan was one of those actors who had had to make magic and menace out of many dull roles, but in John Claggart, he really got the chance to rise to his zenith as a dramatic actor. The scene with him and Stamp under the stars where Billy tries to reach him is one of Cinema's most extraordinary scenes. Awesome actor. One of the greatest British films of the 60s, no question.

User avatar
kinjitsu
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2005 1:39 pm
Location: Uffa!

#23 Post by kinjitsu » Tue Mar 06, 2007 8:22 pm

Gordon wrote:But, I agree that the 1964 awards were also screwy
You mean 1963, not 1964. :wink:

The film was released in 1962, hence my feeble-minded confusion. Am I getting old, or what?

User avatar
tryavna
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2005 4:38 pm
Location: North Carolina

#24 Post by tryavna » Tue Mar 06, 2007 9:40 pm

Gordon wrote:Anyway. Robert Ryan was one of those actors who had had to make magic and menace out of many dull roles, but in John Claggart, he really got the chance to rise to his zenith as a dramatic actor. The scene with him and Stamp under the stars where Billy tries to reach him is one of Cinema's most extraordinary scenes. Awesome actor. One of the greatest British films of the 60s, no question.
It's my considered opinion that Ryan is one of those few actors who never gave a bad performance, though he certainly appeared in a few bad movies. I remember reading somewhere -- can't remember where now -- that Ryan probably worked with more auteurs than any other American actor: Anthony Mann, Nick Ray, Jean Renoir, Joseph Losey, Fritz Lang, Sam Peckinpah, Sam Fuller, Robert Aldrich, Jacques Tourneur, etc. Plus, the man was a "two-fisted liberal" that McCarthy didn't dare touch because of his war record. Ryan is one of the few actors I would have actually liked to meet and buy a beer for.

User avatar
Gordon
Waster of Cinema
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2004 8:03 am

#25 Post by Gordon » Tue Mar 06, 2007 9:41 pm

kinjitsu wrote:
Gordon wrote:But, I agree that the 1964 awards were also screwy
You mean 1963, not 1964. :wink:

The film was released in 1962, hence my feeble-minded confusion. Am I getting old, or what?
No - I mean that the 1964 Oscars were also screwy! In fact, every AA ceremony has been screwy! At least Jimmy Wong Howe won for Hud - another example of a masterfully photographed BW-scope film.

Anyway, years are not important, only events.

Post Reply