Passages

A subforum to discuss film culture and criticism both old and new, as well as memorializing public figures we've lost.
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FrauBlucher
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 8:28 pm
Location: Greenwich Village

Re: Passages

#7601 Post by FrauBlucher » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:05 pm

Me too. They deserve as much credit as the rest of the UK punk bands.

perkypat
Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2012 11:49 am

Re: Passages

#7602 Post by perkypat » Fri Dec 07, 2018 5:37 am

otis wrote:
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:04 pm
Pete Shelley
Soundtrack to my youth. Absolute legend. RIP Pete.

j99
Joined: Wed May 27, 2009 10:18 am

Re: Passages

#7603 Post by j99 » Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:16 pm

Pete Shelley was also responsible for putting on the Sex Pistols at the now legendary Lesser Free Trade Hall gig in Manchester, as well as releasing one of the first UK independent singles, the seminal Spiral Scratch ep, which is surely one of the best ever single releases. His importance in the punk era cannot be underestimated, and Geoff Travis of Rough Trade cited him as the prime influence for the beginning of his label. While I preferred the Howard Devoto version of Buzzcocks, particularly the bootleg Time’s Up album, which eventually got an official release, they were a great band, especially their first two albums, and their run of singles and B sides, collected on the Going Steady compilation, were superb. He went far too soon.

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hearthesilence
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:22 am
Location: NYC

Re: Passages

#7604 Post by hearthesilence » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:34 pm

Their eponymous 2003 album was surprisingly strong too, nearly on par with their first three LP's, but everyone should definitely start with the singles conveniently collected on Singles Going Steady, which is simply one of the great singles collections in all of rock. Or just spring for Product, which is a brilliant three-CD collection - very affordable and I actually prefer the mastering over all other CD issues.

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MichaelB
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Re: Passages

#7605 Post by MichaelB » Wed Dec 12, 2018 7:23 pm

Hungarian director Ferenc Kosa. I only saw one of his films, but Ten Thousand Suns (1967) was exceptionally good - I wrote this review after catching an ultra-rare big-screen outing a decade ago.
Ten Thousand Suns

One of the most impressive Hungarian directorial debuts, Ten Thousand Suns offers clinching proof that Miklós Jancsó wasn’t the only mid-1960s master routinely offering breathtaking widescreen compositions featuring hundreds of men and horses. Shot by Sándor Sára, then well on his way to cementing his reputation as one of Hungarian cinematography’s greatest visual artists, the film routinely throws up stunning shots: mass wheat scything, dozens of horses crossing a bridge to market (followed shortly afterwards by train wagons crossing the same bridge heading in the opposite direction, a neat visual gag on technological progress), prisoners doing hard labour on a rocky hillside, numerous public festivities crammed with local colour. The aesthetic impact alone makes it’s easy to see why this once had a considerable international reputation, even achieving a commercial release in Britain.

Another reason for its acclaim outside Hungary may be that while it tackles similar material to Zoltán Fábri’s Twenty Hours (Húsz óra, 1965), it does so in the much more immediately accessible form of a three-decade family saga (the period alluded to by the title adds up to just over 27 years) which spans the pre-war era through to the János Kádár’s so-called ‘goulash communism’ of the 1960s. We watch the former peasants István Széles (Tibor Molnár), his wife Juli (a wonderfully expressive Gyöngyi Bürös, her silences as eloquent her sparse dialogue) and their friend Bánó Fülöp (János Koltai) negotiating all the pitfalls that history strews in their path, not always with complete success. Though long-term friends, István and Bánó are politically poles apart: Bánó is the local Communist activist, organising a trade union and enthusiastically implementing agricultural reform on the local collective farm. By contrast, István consciously shuns identification with a particular line, and while this makes him a much more clear-sighted observer of communism’s drawbacks, it’s not without considerable hardship along the way, including a long spell in prison – though he also refuses to side with the rebels of 1956, since they also stand in the way of his landowning ambitions. (More specifically, he refuses to shoot Bánó, despite the latter now being firmly established as his ideological ‘enemy’).

Kósa parallels this central narrative with a vivid portrait of the lot of workers over this period. Before the war, István, Juli, Bánó and their peasant cohorts live in extreme poverty, effectively slaves to the local landowners and all their actions are shown to have moral consequences above and beyond their notional illegality – for instance, stealing straw from the pigs to use as fuel on New Year’s Eve means that the piglets will be found frozen to death the following morning (in one of many quirky touches that separate this film from one of Jancsó’s more earnest parables, the miscreants are ordered to apologise to the surviving pigs). The potato is the staple diet, and not just as food – Bánó manages to get one to power a radio. A strike leads to a confrontation between those seeking higher wages and those who point out that they’ll starve without work, though the latter end up ritually humiliated by being tied to upended wheelbarrows and having dirt thrown in their faces.

Following the war, whose passage and outcome is efficiently conveyed by newsreels and shots of black-shrouded women in mourning laying candles on tombstones, a new government decrees that the land belongs to those who need it. This leads to scenes that echo one of the flashbacks in Twenty Hours, as over-excited peasants pre-emptively raid a grain store, a politician pleading with them to stop and wait as the grain will soon be theirs anyway. A massed celebration includes a speed-eating contest reminiscent of the ones in György Pálfi’s grotesque Taxidermia (2006) as well as mass wrestling, a twilight dance around a bonfire, and a merry-go-round (an iconic shot for Hungarian cinema ever since Zoltán Fábri made one the centrepiece of his breakthrough film Merry-Go-Round/Körhinta in 1955).

But the euphoria quickly gives way to disgruntlement: Bánó asserts that the more one gives, the happier one is, but when he seeks to put this notion into practice by requisitioning some of István’s grain for the benefit of poorer community members, István is unimpressed by the argument that it properly belongs to the people and resolves to steal it back, an action that leads to the death of his man-mountain accomplice Mihály (previously seen as a champion speed-eater and wrestler) and hard labour for István himself. When he returns, he finds his son grown up (and now played by András Kozák, a regular lead in Jancsó’s films) and evidence of the encroachment of progress – Juli tells him that the women wear nylon now, and the peasant houses are now dwarfed by much more modern buildings. This sequence of the film delights in juxtaposing the ancient and the modern: a lovely lyrical sequence sees a session of ploughing accompanied by the slow movement of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony, a forest is mysteriously populated with riderless bicycles, and a trip to the beach reveals a bizarre juxtaposition of costume styles from modern bathing costumes to traditional Hungarian male headgear.

The film’s final sequences reveal Kósa’s ultimate thesis, as father and son are explicitly contrasted despite sharing the same name. István senior is a traditionalist, raised as part of a hierarchy, and consequently his notion of ambition is to rise up to the top – or at least to a level where he can ensure a life of comfort and plenty. He’s paralleled with King Lear, whose decision to give up his land resulted in his decline and death. But István junior is a child of the postwar era, raised in a very different environment where the physical and social needs of the community come before individual desires – and therefore, Kósa implies, a model citizen of a new socialist Hungary where theory and practice can finally become one.


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flyonthewall2983
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Re: Passages

#7607 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:15 pm


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colinr0380
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
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Re: Passages

#7608 Post by colinr0380 » Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:51 pm

flyonthewall2983 wrote:
Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:15 pm
Sondra Locke
Whilst her relationship with Clint Eastwood is getting focused on, I want to put in a work for Locke's work as a director. I have not had the chance to see her debut directorial feature Ratboy which she also starred in and worryingly looks like it could be the most tone deaf in sensitivity response to the Peter Bodganovich film Mask that had come out a year prior. But I really like undercover vice cop thriller Impulse which is one of Theresa Russell's best non-Nicolas Roeg roles (Russell's other role being the next year's strangely thematically similar Whore, for Ken Russell) and also features George Dzundza in a slimy cop role a couple of years before he was in Basic Instinct as Michael Douglas's partner!

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: Passages

#7609 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Fri Dec 14, 2018 1:42 am


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Lemmy Caution
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 3:26 am
Location: East of Shanghai

Sweet Nancy Wilson

#7610 Post by Lemmy Caution » Fri Dec 14, 2018 4:32 am

Nancy Wilson had a pretty amazing career.
Singing, touring, acting, civil rights movement, NPR hosting.
She had a dedicated work ethic. And always classy.
It wasn't easy to have develop a successful jazz singing career in the 60's and beyond. I think Nancy Wilson and Abbey Lincoln managed it impressively and on their own terms.

For anyone unfamiliar with her, I'd rec listening to Save Your Love For Me recorded with Cannonball Adderley's group. Adderley largely discovered her and got her career started. After that, the next song to load is a live in studio version of the same song with the same group, different vocals and backing. Worth comparing.

Here's Nancy Wilson's 1962 TV appearance on Jazz Scene USA hosted by Oscar Brown Jr.

Image

Image
Last edited by Lemmy Caution on Fri Dec 14, 2018 10:44 am, edited 1 time in total.

Kauno
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2011 4:01 am

Re: Passages

#7611 Post by Kauno » Fri Dec 14, 2018 7:10 am

Matti Kassila 1924–2018

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GaryC
Joined: Fri Mar 28, 2008 3:56 pm
Location: Aldershot, Hampshire, UK

Re: Passages

#7612 Post by GaryC » Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:08 am

A late entry, but missed here, Donald Gordon Payne, who wrote as James Vance Marshall, Donald Gordon and Ian Cameron, died 22 August this year at the age of 94. His 1959 novel Walkabout (originally published as The Children, under the Marshall name) formed the basis of the 1971 Nicolas Roeg film. His novel under the Cameron name The Lost Ones was filmed by Disney in 1974 as The Island at the Top of the World.

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FrauBlucher
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 8:28 pm
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Re: Passages

#7613 Post by FrauBlucher » Sat Dec 15, 2018 12:31 pm

They really do this the best....TCM Remembers

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Feego
Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:30 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Passages

#7614 Post by Feego » Sat Dec 15, 2018 10:21 pm

According to his Wikipedia and IMDb pages, frequent Howard Hawks actor Dewey Martin died on April 9. The only things I could find on Google were some blog posts, but Wikipedia provides this SAG-AFTRA memoriam as a source.

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MichaelB
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Passages

#7615 Post by MichaelB » Tue Dec 18, 2018 3:32 pm

Kazimierz Kutz, one of the last survivors of the generation that produced Andrzej Wajda, Jerzy Kawalerowicz, Andrzej Munk, etc - he made his debut in 1958 with Cross of Valour but is best known for his so-called Silesian Trilogy: Salt of the Black Earth (1969), Pearl in the Crown (1970) and The Beads of One Rosary (1979).

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dustysomers
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:39 pm
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Re: Passages

#7616 Post by dustysomers » Tue Dec 18, 2018 3:55 pm


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mfunk9786
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Re: Passages

#7617 Post by mfunk9786 » Wed Dec 19, 2018 12:25 pm

Penny Marshall discussion moved here

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Feego
Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:30 pm
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Re: Passages

#7618 Post by Feego » Thu Dec 20, 2018 6:04 pm


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Professor Wagstaff
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2010 11:27 pm

Re: Passages

#7619 Post by Professor Wagstaff » Fri Dec 21, 2018 1:08 am


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HinkyDinkyTruesmith
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2017 10:21 pm

Re: Passages

#7620 Post by HinkyDinkyTruesmith » Fri Dec 21, 2018 1:12 am

Professor Wagstaff wrote:
Fri Dec 21, 2018 1:08 am
Donald Moffat
I studied James Joyce under his daughter, who is a professor of literature. A little uncanny to see it on here. (She looks remarkably similar, especially when they're yelling.) The quote "I'd rather not spend the rest of the winter tied to this fucking couch," was oft used by me and some film interested friends.

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Polybius
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 10:57 pm
Location: Rollin' down Highway 41

Re: Passages

#7621 Post by Polybius » Fri Dec 21, 2018 1:45 am

I love that line, so much.

I also love his short but wonderful turn as Lyndon Johnson in The Right Stuff and the (similar, now that I think of it) portrayal of the hilariously domineering stepfather of Robin Williams/coach of the other team in The Best of Times.

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colinr0380
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK

Re: Passages

#7622 Post by colinr0380 » Fri Dec 21, 2018 2:19 am

He also appears in a couple of other Philip Kaufman films - in The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid and a couple of scenes of The Unbearable Lightness of Being.

Moffat also worked a lot with Robert Altman too, from Health all the way up to Cookie's Fortune, and also appeared in Costa-Gavras' Music Box, as well as another scientist/doctor role in Michael Critchton adaptation The Terminal Man. But that line and performance of it from The Thing is one of those scenes that feel perfect in giving both a climax to a scene but also an actor a extremely memorable moment to play that concisely gets to the core of their character!

Perhaps it was his look and bearing but it is interesting that he played many authority roles, often doctors, but often flawed or compromised ones who under the surface of being calm and collected seem desperately trying to cope in the face of radical change. It was sort of inevitable that when he was in a disaster movie, Earthquake, he played another doctor!

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: Passages

#7623 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Fri Dec 21, 2018 3:26 am

He was great in Clear And Present Danger, as someone who's playing Reagan (but not Reagan).

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bearcuborg
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Re: Passages

#7624 Post by bearcuborg » Fri Dec 21, 2018 1:18 pm

colinr0380 wrote:
Fri Dec 21, 2018 2:19 am
Moffat also worked a lot with Robert Altman too, from Health all the way up to Cookie's Fortune
Loved him in that wonderful movie.

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colinr0380
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
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Re: Passages

#7625 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Dec 26, 2018 2:54 pm

The UK's most famous nun, Sister Wendy Beckett who over a number of series made Sunday evenings sexy by exploring the erotic power of artistic masterpieces (probably the most nudity the BBC has ever shown at primetime in one go!)

I'm joking but only a little, although every week it was a little nervewracking to wonder if Sister Wendy would suffer from Stendhal syndrome in front of the camera! She did do a lot for the appreciation of art on television though, infusing static works with the breathlessly told stories behind them. I found her quite an inspiring figure.
Last edited by colinr0380 on Wed Dec 26, 2018 6:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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