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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:24 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:22 am
Location: NYC
BAM is screening what appears to be a new DCP of Perceval. An excellent chance to see what some say is actually a key albeit unique masterwork in Rohmer's oeuvre, I don't think I fully appreciated it the first time, partly because a key element comes from the wording of the dialogue, which didn't come across in the subtitles I saw.

An excerpt from an excellent essay by Andrea Picard published in Cinemascope:

Quote:
Left unfinished at the time of de Troyes’ death in 1190, Perceval, le conte du Graal (Perceval, the Story of the Grail), generally considered the first French novel, was translated into a modern French prose that Rohmer considered rather dull and sluggish, and fundamentally responsible for the work’s considerable languishing in its native country. His affection for the original text—its use of rhyming couplets, as well as its tale of a clumsy, peripatetic spiritual and romantic quest replete with great moments of humour, self-reflection, and an eventual apotheosis—led Rohmer to translate the 9,234 verses into modern French, then back again into octosyllabic verse, ending up with a text closer to the original in sound, spirit, and poetic structure (even reserving some archaic words where he deemed them imperative).


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2016 5:20 pm 

Joined: Fri Aug 19, 2005 9:34 pm
Location: Boston Ma
Eric Rohmer bio coming in June.

http://cup.columbia.edu/book/eric-rohmer/9780231175586


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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2016 5:46 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2016 4:21 pm
I really like Rohmer. So far I've only seen:

Chloe in the Afternoon
Claire's Knee
The Green Ray
The Romance of Astrea and Celadon

But he's the type where after I've seen one or two, I'm pretty sure I'll love 90% of his work.


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PostPosted: Sat May 07, 2016 2:36 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:05 pm
Location: Connecticut
MaxBercovicz wrote:
I really like Rohmer. So far I've only seen:

Chloe in the Afternoon
Claire's Knee
The Green Ray
The Romance of Astrea and Celadon

But he's the type where after I've seen one or two, I'm pretty sure I'll love 90% of his work.


Be sure to watch My Night at Maud's, A Tale of Winter, and A Tale of Summer.


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PostPosted: Sat May 07, 2016 12:06 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2010 2:00 am
Location: USA
I just saw A Summer's Tale (library hoopla), and they also have A Tale of Winter, Full Moon in Paris, 4 Adventures of Reinette and Mirabelle, and The Marquise of O. I'll now watch any and all of Eric Rohmer's films that I can get my hands on.

Only now realizing that Melvil Poupaud in Summer also played Laurence in Xavier Dolan's Laurence Anyways.


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PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2016 9:44 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 12:44 am
What I liked most about Rohmer is his method of how to present his characters and their manners. He really understand the way men think and the things they desire. I was amazed how he cleverly built up the relations between the characters and drove them to the line he wanted to reach. Rohmer has always pictured the affairs in many different ways. Yet, he became one the few greatest directors who cleverly know the making films of affairs.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 13, 2016 4:03 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2016 8:53 am
Thanks for all the fab links on this thread, many still to be savoured. And the many great posts.

I find Rohmer inspirational. A poet. Walt Whitman wrote that we expect a poet to "to indicate the path between reality and [our] souls." which seems so true of him - but many things true of poets and poetry apply of course. I'm sad that despite every opportunity I've only discovered him in the last five years or so, my journey to get there not unlike one of his heroines to her heart, wonder how different life would have been to have heard one of his conversations as they came out, or one of the already famous ones. Something to regret, but happy to have got to him.

I'm working my way through his films, on DVD mostly, slowly and with relish. I saw a film club projection of The Green Ray that began this and led me to the Arrow box set. Seeing The Aviator's Wife I may have seen it long ago or part of it, but never got back to it. So his Comedies and Proverbs have come first for me. I love the Moral Tales, especially My Night at Mauds, La Collectioneuse and Love in The Afternoon - but I notice a slight spikiness to these films compared to the comedies and proverbs. This may be given their focus on men, I sometimes wonder if it is also anything to do with more experience of life. I'm wondering if there is more forgiveness in him later (on my limited experience of his films). I don't really have any of those that I've seen that I do not like. I loved The Marquise of O, so beautifully paced -- and interesting in that regard to compare with Barry Lyndon which must have been made at a similar time ('75 and '76 I see), also well paced but more bursting with action. That pace so important, so lost now.

I've seen the first two of the Tales of the Four Seasons - I don't agree with some that Springtime is weak (respectfully) - for me it is not in the least bit weak, it is a triumph of an argument for non judgement and open heartedness. That is quiet in tone, but strong. This week I saw A Winter's Tale - I'd have said it was impossible to, but feel he surpassed himself, profound, moving, yet light in some ways, provoked cries from me. An artist as others have said. I suppose it's brought me here (thanks to a friend (I think who's posted previously) who recommended this place) to register a first post and just say it. I hope to watch them all, and again and again and lucky to see i have quite a number to see (an finally finish reading Pascal). I've put off reading the new biography (new in English) - but this week, and a few days off, I can't resist.

I enjoy his interiors as much as exteriors (in people too) and a sense that for all there's a caution, conservatism, that there is so much radical about him in approach, subjects. His approach to character and manners indeed rush.1.


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