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PostPosted: Mon Oct 26, 2009 8:20 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Full specs announced:

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Terence Davies Collection

Considered by many to be Britain's most gifted and remarkable filmmaker, Terence Davies' visually stunning, intensely personal films have impressed audiences the world over and seen him proclaimed by critics as one of contemporary cinema's true poets.

Collected together for the first time in one DVD set, along with extra features and a booklet of essays, are The Terence Davies Trilogy (1976-1983), Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), The Long Day Closes (1992) and Of Time and the City (2008).

The Terence Davies Trilogy
These three semi-autobiographical short films follow the journey of Robert Tucker, first seen as a hangdog child in Children, then as a hollow-eyed middle-aged man in Madonna and Child, and finally as a decrepit old man in Death and Transfiguration. Dreamlike and profoundly moving.

• Feature commentary by Terence Davies;
• Filmed interview with Terence Davies.

UK / 1976-1983 / b&w / English, optional hard-of-hearing subtitles / 94 mins / DVD-9 / Original aspect ratio 1.33:1.

Distant Voices, Still Lives
An impressionistic view of working-class life in 1940s and 1950s Liverpool that stars Freda Dowie and Pete Postlethwaite. Through a series of exquisite tableaux Davies creates a deeply affecting photo album of a troubled family wrestling with the complexity of love.

• Feature commentary by director Terence Davies;
• Filmed interview with Terence Davies;
• Filmed introduction with Art Director Miki van Zwanenberg;
• Original trailer.

UK / 1988 / col / English, optional hard-of-hearing subtitles / 80 mins / DVD-9 / Aspect ratio 1.78:1 (16 x 9 anamorphic).

The Long Day Closes
Bud's home is happy and safe, but his Catholic school is a harsh world where teachers administer lashings, and he is bullied and friendless. Once again Davies creates a dreamlike montage of memories, using gliding tracking shots and an artful layering of pop songs and religious music.

• Feature commentary with Terence Davies and Director of Photography Mick Coulter;
• On-set interview with production designer Christopher Hobbs;
• Previously unseen behind-the-scenes footage of Terence Davies directing.

UK / 1992 / col / English, optional hard-of-hearing subtitles / 85 mins / DVD-9 / Aspect ratio 1.85:1.

Of Time and the City
Davies revisits the city of his youth in this deeply personal BAFTA-nominated evocation of post-World War II Liverpool. Through the film's patchwork visual poetry, woven entirely from painstakingly researched archival footage, Davies explores an urban landscape that echoes his own troubled past to speak candidly of his childhood experiences.

• The making of Of Time and the City (2009) – in new interviews, Terence Davies and the film’s producers and archive producer discuss the making of the film and the inspirations behind it
Listen to Britain (Humphrey Jennings, Stuart McAllister, 1942) the classic wartime documentary which helped inspire Of Time and the City, presented with a personal introduction by Terence Davies
• Q&A with Terence Davies at Cambridge Arts Picturehouse
• Original trailer

UK / 2008 / col, and b&w / English, optional hard-of-hearing subtitles / 74 mins / DVD-9 / Aspect ratio 1.77: 1 (16 x 9 anamorphic widescreen).

Release date: 16 November 2009
RRP: £39.99 / cat. no. BFIVD871 / cert 15


Based on the example set by the Jacques Tati Collection, I'm assuming this will consist of the original DVDs repackaged into slimline Amaray cases, with a single booklet duplicating the content of the originals, all contained in a cardboard sleeve - but I'll confirm for definite when I see a final production copy.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2009 4:14 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
I now have a final production copy, and can confirm that my guess was bang on the money.

The four discs (as far as I can see, straightforward repressings of the individual releases, complete with extras) are in their own slimline Amaray slipcases with a chapter listing on the inside of each box, and there's a single 28-page booklet containing:

2-3: 'A different kind of British cinema' by Derek Jarman;
4-5: cast and credits for each individual part of the Terence Davies Trilogy;
7-9: 'Bittersweet Symphony' by Beryl Bainbridge;
11: cast and credits for Distant Voices Still Lives;
13-16: 'The music of the years gone by' by Paul Farley;
17: cast and credits for The Long Day Closes;
19-21: 'Of Time and the City' by Matthew Gandy;
22-23: credits, archive sources and music for Of Time and the City;
24-25: Terence Davies biography;
26-27: Acknowledgements and DVD production credits.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2009 2:21 pm 

Joined: Sat Aug 18, 2007 11:16 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY, USA
MichaelB wrote:
The four discs ... are in their own slimline Amaray slipcases...


Do these slim cases come with cover art ? Are these covers the same as on individual disk?
Thanks!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2009 4:23 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
videozor wrote:
MichaelB wrote:
The four discs ... are in their own slimline Amaray slipcases...


Do these slim cases come with cover art ? Are these covers the same as on individual disk?
Thanks!


I don't have the individual discs to hand any more, but as far as I can see the slipcase art is identical, apart from the thinner spines.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2009 5:50 pm 
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DVD Beaver review


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2011 6:18 am 
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Location: Tokyo, Japan
Just watched "Of Time And The City", and the extras, and Terence Davies is just amazing to hear. The intellect, the wit, the tone, the man is really something to listen to. I have to delve into his other films just to hear his commentaries as well.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2011 7:40 am 
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He's one of the great DVD commentators as far as I'm concerned - they're all well worth a listen, whether it's the masochistically self-critical one for Children or the warmly nostalgic conversation with his DOP on The Long Day Closes.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:39 am 

Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 6:31 am
I recently got the collection from Amazon. There were some awful sound glitches in "Children"
from the "Trilogy" and some as well in "Madonna and Child". I tried other DVD players, but
it seemed to be in the disc. I got a replacement set, only to find the same problem. Has anyone else noticed this?


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:18 pm 
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Are these by-products of the transfer, or the fact that the films had rock-bottom budgets?


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 1:02 pm 
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Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:25 am
Location: SLC, UT
I just watched Children and noticed the same sound glitches. Most of them are loud pops, while others sound like some kind of electronic distortion. I made note of when a few of them take place, in case anyone with more know-how can identify whether they are more likely down to the source or the authoring.

18:54
18:56
19:16
35:19


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