Assassination Nation (Sam Levinson, 2018)

Discuss films of the 21st century including current cinema, current filmmakers, and film festivals.
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DarkImbecile
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Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2013 6:24 pm
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Assassination Nation (Sam Levinson, 2018)

#1 Post by DarkImbecile » Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:07 am

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I have no idea what this movie is, but that's certainly an attention-getting poster.

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PfR73
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2005 6:07 pm

Re: The Films of 2018

#2 Post by PfR73 » Wed Jun 27, 2018 1:36 pm

Apparently the writer/director is the son of Barry Levinson.

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colinr0380
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Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK

Re: The Films of 2018

#3 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Jun 27, 2018 3:01 pm

Serendipitously I just was hearing about Assassination Nation on one of the IndieWire podcasts from Sundance earlier this year that I only just caught up with this afternoon! The film apparently has something to do with social media satire, in which a whole town's secret lives get outed (something about men being annoyed at women for revealing things about them?) and it results in a witchhunt. It's set in Salem, natch.

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DarkImbecile
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Re: The Films of 2018

#4 Post by DarkImbecile » Tue Jul 17, 2018 11:23 am


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Never Cursed
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Re: Assassination Nation (Sam Levinson, 2018)

#5 Post by Never Cursed » Fri Sep 21, 2018 3:57 am

Well now I feel a little bad for slagging off Flower almost on a conceptual level, because here's a movie that tackles some similar subject matter (both movies with an offbeat, unlikeable female protagonist with a penchant for explicit drawings nonetheless) that I thought was much better. Much like DarkImbecile said for Flower, I tenuously liked this movie, and I thought it functioned extremely well as a teen movie designed to manipulate the target audience of teens on as base a level as possible, though I liked the movie more in its first half when it was hyperbolically exploring the social effects of a mass hack (ie when it was actually exploiting its premise) than when it went for more standard slasher ideas later on. Unlike Flower, which I thought made the mistake of treating its charmless main character with reverence, this movie never convinced me it was in love with its leads, and at least my reading of the movie was that that their attitudes and actions were 100% one of the targets of the social commentary being made. Levinson is definitely overreaching with some of his message (somehow I don't think people in real life have such internalized misogyny that they physically attack random "loose" girls)
SpoilerShow
and the movie completely falls apart in its last few minutes - everything after the final speech screams "we didn't know how to end this"
but there are enough well-executed sequences to mostly pick up the slack - I'm thinking in particular of one great tracking/fake tracking shot which circles around and reframes the interiors of a house during a violent B&E for minutes on end - so overall I think I enjoyed this, if that's the right word to use for such a cynical movie.

Oh, and like this movie, I'll offer a preemptive trigger warning: there are a couple fairly violent sequences in the movie that are more extreme than promotional materials would lead you to believe. I mean, if you plan to see Suspiria or The House That Jack Built theatrically, then no sweat, but it's certainly more graphic than most horror films of this kind (though I should point out that this isn't a horror film) usually get.

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