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PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2016 6:35 pm 
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There's also another live-action Golgo 13 movie, starring Ken Takakura.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2016 12:51 am 
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The UK Blu-Ray of Sarusuberi / Miss Hokusai (literal title is actual "crepe myrtle" -- a flowering tree that is important to the film) looks gorgeous -- and the film itself is quite good. There is some disconcerting use of J-Pop now and then in the score, but not a big deal for me. This has only a tangential connection to the real lives of Hokusai and his also quite gifted daughter O-ei (based on a manga, apparently) -- but the episodes are generally interesting. We got the barebones version -- not sure what the quality of extras might be for the more deluxe version.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 7:12 pm 
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Saw Shinkai's Your Name and -- while I enjoyed it well enough while watching -- thought it was nowhere near the level of even second tier Studio Ghibli fare or the work of Hosoda (among others). Characters seemed to simply be vehicles for carrying out what the plot needed done, and the plot simply delivered whatever seemed most useful or suspenseful from moment to moment. It looked nice enough and was suspenseful -- but I'll take Letter to Momo over this any day.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 7:35 pm 
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So a Shinkai film basically. After the horribleness of Children Who Chase Lost Voices I realized he was just not worth the effort. Like you said, there are too many great filmmakers working in anime to work through him.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 7:54 pm 
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Never could understand the hoopla over Shinkai -- but wanted to see what smashed Japanese attendance records... Doubt I'll bother with any further Shinkai films..


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 8:53 pm 
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knives wrote:
So a Shinkai film basically. After the horribleness of Children Who Chase Lost Voices I realized he was just not worth the effort. Like you said, there are too many great filmmakers working in anime to work through him.

Have you seen 5 Centimeters per Second?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 8:59 pm 
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Yes, it is easily the best of his long form films I've seen, but that isn't saying much. It benefits by having nothing offensive and characters that feel lived in. Still, I can't say I enjoyed it as more than okay with others' similar efforts delivering more.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 9:14 pm 
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No love for The Garden of Words? :(


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 9:16 pm 
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I strongly dislike that one to be honest due to its grotesque handling of the student teacher power dynamic.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 9:52 pm 
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You call that dynamic grotesque? It was innocent to me. They were not aware of each other's identity. Even as an audience, we don't know the female character's identity for at least first 20 minutes. I thought the film had a perfect climax too. Anyways, it was the best 45 minutes I spent in ages.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 9:59 pm 
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The teacher is established as knowing his identity from the beginning even if we don't discover her knowledge until later.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 2:51 pm 

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 1:47 pm
knives wrote:
So a Shinkai film basically. After the horribleness of Children Who Chase Lost Voices I realized he was just not worth the effort. Like you said, there are too many great filmmakers working in anime to work through him.


Not in theatres though. Basically it's been Hosoda-Shinkai-Miyazaki-whenever-he-unretires for the past 7 or 8 years. There are a couple of one-off anime filmmakers here and there, but those 3 are basically the only filmmakers cranking out anime films on a semi-consistent basis. I'm trying to think of who I might be missing.

colinr0380 wrote:

The most bizarre thing though was finding out that the director of The Professional: Golgo 13 was Osamu Dezaki, whose brother Satoshi Dezaki directed the Mad Bull 34 series! (And Satoshi Dezaki also previously wrote and directed Grey Digital Target!). That was a strange connection that I'd not previously been aware of before going into detail on their various credits, but I guess it goes to show how small a world it can be at times! (Also interesting to me was finding out that the first 1986-made episode of the three part Violence Jack series was directed by Ichirô Itano, who decades later would direct the similarly nihilistic 2004 Gantz anime series!)


Sorry to drag your older post up, colin, but I was wondering if you've seen some of Osamu Dezaki's other stuff, and what you did you think of them? He's known for working on genre stuff that range from macho chauvinistic seinen (Golgo 13 and Space Adventure Cobra), super melodramatic shoujo (Rose of Versailles and Oniisama e...), and even animation strictly for American broadcast TV! (Mighty Orbots, Bionic Six, Rainbow Brite!) but I find him interesting in that he has an easily identifiable individual style that's unmistakably his own.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 7:04 pm 
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Other notable/promising directors --

Keiichi Hara -- Summer Days with Coo, Colorful, Miss Hokusai
Hiroyuki Okiura - A Letter to Momo (lots of work as character designer and key animator on other projects)


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 7:23 pm 

Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 11:12 am
Maasaki Yuasa's been working on shorts and series ever since Mind Game, but he's got two feature films due to come out this year that look promising


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 8:49 pm 
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jojo wrote:
colinr0380 wrote:
The most bizarre thing though was finding out that the director of The Professional: Golgo 13 was Osamu Dezaki, whose brother Satoshi Dezaki directed the Mad Bull 34 series! (And Satoshi Dezaki also previously wrote and directed Grey Digital Target!). That was a strange connection that I'd not previously been aware of before going into detail on their various credits, but I guess it goes to show how small a world it can be at times! (Also interesting to me was finding out that the first 1986-made episode of the three part Violence Jack series was directed by Ichirô Itano, who decades later would direct the similarly nihilistic 2004 Gantz anime series!)
Sorry to drag your older post up, colin, but I was wondering if you've seen some of Osamu Dezaki's other stuff, and what you did you think of them? He's known for working on genre stuff that range from macho chauvinistic seinen (Golgo 13 and Space Adventure Cobra), super melodramatic shoujo (Rose of Versailles and Oniisama e...), and even animation strictly for American broadcast TV! (Mighty Orbots, Bionic Six, Rainbow Brite!) but I find him interesting in that he has an easily identifiable individual style that's unmistakably his own.

No problem! I'm afraid that this is an area that I've only just started to explore after swerving away from these titles in the mid 90s after the pans given to them in Helen McCarthy's Anime Movie Guide. I have however made it through the first ten episodes (out of fifty) of that 2008-9 Golgo 13 TV series and that has been OK, though you have to be really, really, really into characters going into almost orgasmic reveries over makes and models of guns and how they are put together in almost fetishistic detail! And that whole thing about Golgo 13 being a Japanese attempt to do something to appeal to Western audiences (as McCarthy mentioned in her review of the 1979 feature film anime) seems different here, as this is sort of the ultimate Japanese guy who is more powerful and virile (as well as tactiurn and more of a lone wolf figure) than all of the Western archetypes surrounding him in each of the 'assassination of the weeks' (very Victor Lewis-Smith-esque!) on display! You wouldn't have to go too far to suggest that Golgo 13 and Marv from Sin City were long lost half-brothers!

Though while I haven't had the opportunity to see it yet I have heard a bit about the Rose of Versailles series, which I'd really like to see at some point, as well as the 1979 live action version of it by Jacques Demy(!), Lady Oscar, starring Catriona MacColl (who would go on to starring in three of Lucio Fulci's best gory horrors!) in the title role.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 12:15 pm 

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Michael Kerpan wrote:
Saw Shinkai's Your Name and -- while I enjoyed it well enough while watching -- thought it was nowhere near the level of even second tier Studio Ghibli fare or the work of Hosoda (among others). Characters seemed to simply be vehicles for carrying out what the plot needed done, and the plot simply delivered whatever seemed most useful or suspenseful from moment to moment. It looked nice enough and was suspenseful -- but I'll take Letter to Momo over this any day.


Did you watch the English dub? The English dub looked baaaaad based on the trailer, so maybe that's why the characters seemed flat to you.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 6:19 pm 
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We _almost_ saw the English dub -- as refugees from a Red Turtle showing where the system failed -- but ran away quickly -- and came back later (twice -- once for Red Turtle, once for Your Name in Japanese).


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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 1:02 pm 

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Peter-H wrote:
Michael Kerpan wrote:
Saw Shinkai's Your Name and -- while I enjoyed it well enough while watching -- thought it was nowhere near the level of even second tier Studio Ghibli fare or the work of Hosoda (among others). Characters seemed to simply be vehicles for carrying out what the plot needed done, and the plot simply delivered whatever seemed most useful or suspenseful from moment to moment. It looked nice enough and was suspenseful -- but I'll take Letter to Momo over this any day.


Did you watch the English dub? The English dub looked baaaaad based on the trailer, so maybe that's why the characters seemed flat to you.


I've seen both and sub. The dub is good, by the standards of dubs. Most dubs today are generally of a better standard than they were 15-20 years ago. But for many viewers, the idea of watching a dub is pointless, anyway.

Your Name is fundamentally a populist movie that has all the good and bad that aiming for a broader audience entails. It's easy to see why it's so popular with a certain demographic in the same way that it's easy to see why Titanic was so popular. It goes for broad character strokes rather than subtlety and it's more interested in taking the audience "for a ride" in a way that is more in line with what mainstream audiences "expect" out of a moviegoing experience. Personally, I liked it...but it's definitely not a movie that holds up if you think about it too much. Good movie to take a date to.


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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 1:49 pm 
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> Good movie to take a date to.

Probably much better for this purpose than the far superior Red Turtle.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 1:16 pm 
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Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
It was nice to read this bit of news in the article on In This Corner Of The World in the latest edition of Neo:
Quote:
Of Katabuchi's past films Mai Mai Miracle should be being released soon as a Blu-ray/DVD combi-pack by Anime Limited. The same company has acquired another of Katabuchi's backlist Princess Arete. Released in 2001, the film is a feminist fairy tale about a brave princess imprisoned by a sorceror, who must rescue herself without any Prince Charming. It's based on a British children's book from the 1980s, The Clever Princess by Diana Coles.

I'm really glad that these are getting released, especially as I've always wanted to see Princess Arete since finding out that the late Russian singer Origa featured on the soundtrack.


Last edited by colinr0380 on Mon Jul 10, 2017 7:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 08, 2017 8:10 am 
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I'm also excited that this is finally getting a release: this month Funimation are putting out in the US a complete set of the Japanese take on a Dungeons & Dragons inspired fantasy world Record of Lodoss War. It is apparently going to contain the 13 part 1990-1 OVAs (on Blu-ray) as well as the 1998 27 episode TV series (on DVD only).

I cannot really comment on the quality of the series as I've not had the opportunity to see it. But I have had a CD of the music from the show for over two decades picked up on a whim, so I'll be interested to finally be able to place where some music cues that I'm really familiar with come in the series. The first volume of the Record of Lodoss War soundtrack has perhaps my all time favourite piece of soundtrack music on it, the instrumental version of Adesso e Fortuna (Flame and Eternity). I love the way that the strings and the piano intertwine with each other during the piece, taking up the theme from the other and elaborating on it. And on a darker note, Dark Emperor Beld's theme is wonderfully overwrought in how tense and nervy it is! I currently like imagining it is playing whilst I'm doing something incredibly mundane and simple like making a cup of tea, to heighten the drama of that situation! That always makes me smile! (Will the right amount of milk get poured in the cup? Before or after the teabag goes in? Two spoonfuls of sugar? The suspense is killing me!) Though I'm sure that it will be used more conventionally in the series itself!


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:17 pm 

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 1:47 pm
Record of Lodoss Wars' soundtrack is definitely the standout element of the OVA series, along with the ornately detailed Nobuteru Yuki character designs which border on fetish. While it's a perfectly strong adaptation of a D&D type world, it's fairly conventional and straightforward in its execution which is probably why it was a popular "gateway" anime for new viewers in the 90s. I've only seen half the TV series, and the while the music is again the best part of the show, it is also generally less memorable than the OVA tracks.

Speaking of classical music in anime, have you seen Princess Tutu, Colin? Being a show with ballet as a primary focus, it mainly samples from Tchaikovsky, but it also incorporates pieces from most of the other usual names as well, like Mozart, Beethoven, Strauss, Satie, Chopin, among others. In fact, the "original" music actually takes a backseat in this show, though it does a fair job of maintaining at least a sense of aural consistency with those more famous tracks, even if it doesn't attempt to match them in quality.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 7:28 pm 
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Record of Lodoss War seemed relatively low profile in the UK at the time (I don't think its ever received an official release here, even back in the day on VHS) and was a much bigger deal in the US, which is how I had been vaguely aware of it (hence picking up the soundtrack albums as the next best thing when I couldn't access the actual show through a PAL VHS tape!). I get the impression that the Heroic Legend of Arslan series (the title and main character renamed "Arislan" for the UK market dub to avoid the potential of the unfortunately inevitably unavoidable, "arse" puns!) was the fantasy series getting the heavy push by Manga Video in the UK market at that time.

I've not had a chance to see Princess Tutu, but looking through YouTube there seems to be an explosion of remix music videos of the show all over the place! That series falls squarely in my blind spot period regarding anime, where I was on top of things in the 1990s but then in the early 2000s focused much more on foreign language arthouse cinema and of course Criterions. So I missed a lot of developments between 2001-2010 or so (aside from the two Ghost In The Shell: Stand Alone Complex series), but I am trying to go back and watch a few things now.
___

Speaking of which I have been spending a bit of time over the last couple of weeks going through that 2008-9 Golgo 13 TV series that I briefly mentioned earlier in the thread. I'm exactly halfway at 25 out of 50 episodes in and so far it has a very strange quality about it. There's no continuing storyline that I can make out so far, just an 'assassination of the week' with a whole new cast of supporting characters in a different part of the world every episode. The only recurring character is Golgo 13/"Duke Togo" himself and the very occasional appearances of his gunsmith character of choice who mainly appears when there needs to be a very particular gun created for a specific job. Or to fly a helicopter in a slow circle around a island fortress off the Scottish coast made entirely of glass (and inhabited by young female ex-heroin addicts being cleaned up supposedly in an altruistic rehab clinic but actually as a front for an exclusive organ harvesting centre!) while Golgo 13 lines up the perfect, unrepeatable shot (until he repeats it again just a moment later!). But other than that the series is a succession of standalone stories about the strange ironic fates that befall everyone who Golgo 13 is assigned to kill (spoilers: everyone dies with a bullet squarely in the forehead) or tries to capture him.

I've had a strange response to the series. Initially I was rather concerned about it glamorising the coolness of an impassive assassin too much (with all of the admiring comments from literally everybody that Golgo 13 is "the world class super sniper"! For someone in such a shady profession, hundreds if not thousands of people seem to have heard of this famous killer, and everyone seems to have a way of contacting him! Which is bizarre for someone jet-setting around the world with impunity! Though this is slightly dealt with in a couple of episodes suggesting that he's given free reign to continue working by almost every Western government as he's their own contract killer of choice!), and then got slightly bored by the way that there was no particular ongoing storyline threaded through the individual episodes. Yet around episode ten to episode fifteen something very strange happens (and I don't know if this was intentional by the show or my own thinking towards it changed), and a string of episodes start occurring that start making the assassinations feel more and more tragic. Yet that tragedy is only something that happens to the particular supporting cast of the episode, whilst Golgo 13 comes in to impassively do his job and then leave again, untouched by anything he has witnessed. Episodes occur where Golgo 13 is hired by killers to perform obviously evil acts of targeting innocent people, but also there are episodes where 'good, oppressed' people hire Golgo 13 to solve their problems. There are episodes where the people who hired Golgo 13 are immediately assassinated themselves but he carries out the mission anyway - not from any form of moral retribution, but simply because he's got a job to complete, even in the face of people begging him to just leave and to keep his fee! He's also contrasted a couple of times against fanatical religious cults or brainwashed suicide bombers, but manages to even be even beyond their grasp of worldly nihilism!

Its a very strange, almost completely blank and characterless character, which is bizarre for a television series in which he is the only continuing element! Golgo 13 gets referred to as 'an angel of death' at some points (increasingly so in episodes 20 to 25), and there is that one character moment at this mid-point of the series in which he is shown saying to the people who hire him that "I will listen to your story", as if he is some kind of cleansing figure for the people who spark off each of these little stories. But at least at the half-way mark this feels rather too grandiose a way to describe Golgo 13 - he's a total blank, killing and then moving on. Watching this series sort of inspired me to have a bit of an existential crisis in that there's no particular reason for this character to go on, or stop. There's no inner life there, just another mission, another $3 million in his Swiss bank account for another assassination that nobody in the world but him could pull off (in the mid-section of the show we start moving into episodes where even other contract killers are hiring him to do jobs that they just cannot pull off!) but without any kind of underlying reason for any of it. It made me realise that every other film or book I've read about a hitman figure usually has to throw in some kind of 'humanising' element to sort of explain their killer - they'll have a political motive, or a family at home, or they'll fall in love with the person they have to kill. A lot of those tropes occur here (this series so far has explored almost every possible angle on an assassination premise that I've ever heard of, even repeated a couple of the same types of storyline from different perspectives. And there are still another 25 episodes to go!), but every time there's a situation set up in which there is someone who we could imagine Golgo 13 having empathy for, or taking revenge for, could potentially ally with in a way out of his repeated cycle of mission after mission, or even potentially fall in love with, he'll still just kill his target and walk away from the whole situation.

Its one of the strangest things I've watched in a while, as every episode has an obvious moral slant to it (more and more apparent in the run of episodes from 15 to 25), but its entirely confined to the almost entirely ineffectual supporting cast. Having a moral stance, or being on the side of right or wrong isn't going to cut it in this universe. Even the deus ex machina moments happen ironically! The audience takes away the devastation, the horror, even the cruel irony of the situation while Golgo 13 just strides impassively through it all and out of the scene, seemingly untouched by any form of emotion (though I have just reached the episode where Golgo 13 returns to Northern Ireland to carry out a hit, meets a female assassin colleague and head of a very "Real IRA"-esque organisation who after a one night stand many years before reveals that she had a child heavily implied to be from their hook up ("he had your piercing eyes") who blew himself up by accident while playing with her stash of explosives. That particular episode ends with the woman dead (with her death almost used by Golgo 13 to carry out his own assassination mission) and Golgo 13 driving off, yet at least he left a bouquet of flowers on the grave of the child he never knew he had! That's the only real external act of emotion he's displayed in the entire series to this point (aside from the regular 'piercing eye' moments, sizing up threats or interlocutors!), and its entirely missable, and disappears as quickly as it gets shown). But that itself has the effect of putting the emphasis of this series squarely onto the minutiae of the particular missions themselves. There's no particular tension to whether the assassination will be carried out or not (it will), but its exactly how Golgo 13 will carry out his impossible missions that becomes the focus. Anything else outside of the mission is just a distraction.

And that also makes each victim of each assassination strangely touching in a way as having had the laser focus of Golgo 13 directly focused on them for the amount of time that it takes him to kill them. If the "I will hear your story" moments at the beginning are the equivalent of listening to each contractor's 'confession', then similarly the time spent on organising the death of each target is almost as if Golgo 13 is offering them the 'gift' of his time and attention that he could be spending elsewhere. (Though of course he's getting handsomely paid for it too, but the money only seems to go towards the plane flights to the next mission location!) Each victim is briefly made worthwhile by drifting into his gunsights, but they are transient and interchangeable with the next victim, and the next, and so on. Its probably not intentional but I'm starting to feel a strange sense of the existential emptiness of capitalism here, and even the work ethic itself! Where every location and every building just presents a slightly different puzzle to find the right angle to shoot from. And that itself makes me wish that Antonioni made a Golgo 13 film!

So its a fascinating, but also a strangely disturbing series so far. And weirdly emotional at points too, despite trading in every form of hitman cliché in the book (I'm thinking of tallying up every time a 'Mafia don' is used as a motivating McGuffin for an episode! And everyone dies with a neat bullet to the centre of their temple, as if to emphasise the accuracy of our 'hero'!). I'm conflicted on whether I even think the series is good or not at this mid-point! I kind of want a wider story, or at least some sort of satisfying resolution to Golgo 13's story. Yet that also feels like it would betray the absolute black hole, blank void of the character at the centre of the series by even doing something like that, so I'm also rather concerned about whether the series will go in that direction too! (And honestly the whole series is probably just an excuse for showing the most spectacular, just over the edge of implausible, ways to kill somebody with a single bullet over and above any kind of philosophising). Its almost as if the Golgo 13 character is the ultimate end point of a society fascinated by the cool globetrotting James Bond figure - the suave and sophisticated (lady)killer with ambiguous motives stripped entirely back into a blank, Patrick Bateman-ish empty shell unmoved by any person or thing in his vicinity except for those that fulfil his task at hand.


Last edited by colinr0380 on Mon Aug 21, 2017 3:27 am, edited 10 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 11:50 pm 
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I sampled Princess Tutu. It had some elements I liked, but ultimately it wasn't the sort of show I felt the need to follow through on.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 9:50 pm 
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If anyone makes it to this year's Fantasia Festival in Montreal be sure and check out the latest from Yuasa Masaaki (the director of Mind Game).

Night Is Short, Walk on Girl – Anime about a college student following his dream girl through a surreal all-night used book store. July 30 & 31.

Trailer:


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