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PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2015 10:12 am 
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criterion10 wrote:
The only way this campaign will reach its goal is if a wealthy auteur like a Spielberg steps in and does the right thing.

Which leads me to ask -- what will happen if this campaign does not reach $1 million? So much already has been done that it seems like the film will still be completed at some point, no?


If they don't get to a million in 30 days, they don't get the matching million in funds from Europe, but would keep whatever they did raise. I don't know where that leaves the producers in terms of where to go next, though.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2015 3:09 pm 
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I can understand the reluctance to donate. This film's completion has been rumored for so many years. Back in 2006 when I met Bogdanovich at a book signing he said they hoped to get the film released soon on Showtime.

Now we're to believe it needs $2,000,000 worth of work to complete but back in 2006 it was sort of "close" to completion?


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2015 4:57 pm 
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I am still blinking at the 2 million quoted for the work. There has to be a good reason all the
"big names" mentioned here have so far not chipped in.

Sorry but I remain totally sceptical in the absence of breakdown figures and a business plan.

I hope all the good people who've contributed haven't thrown their money away.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2015 5:00 pm 
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Unless they're extremely wealthy and in a position to be generous (i.e. Spielberg), it's ludicrous to think a filmmaker like Noah Baumbach or Wes Anderson is going to give money when they can barely finance their own films.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 1:12 pm 
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I believe all the talk of "close to completion" in years past was in relation to clearing the legal obstacles to finish the film. Now those obstacles have been cleared and money is needed to simply transfer the miles of negative and complete all of the post-production. When SHOWTIME was still a player in this over a decade ago, the figure being bandied about was $3 million. Given that the producers believe they can deliver a finished product for $2 million in today's dollars probably means that considerable money has already been spent. The producers hoped to get the remaining funds through a distribution deal (note that SHOWTIME is no longer involved although the man behind that deal made a respectable donation to the Indiegogo campaign). When distributors wanted to see something closer to a finished product before closing a deal, the producers started up the crowd-funding campaign.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2015 3:51 pm 
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/snipped/


Last edited by whaleallright on Tue Jun 23, 2015 11:37 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2015 4:41 pm 
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You didn't understand what I said, and it doesn't sound like you quite understand what post-production would generally involve in terms of cost.

If Wes Anderson has a movie with, say, Bill Murray, Tilda Swinton, Bruce Willis/George Clooney/pick-an-A-list-star attached, no, it's not hard to find someone who will put up some money for it. But to make it financially work - i.e. what he needs to physically produce what's on screen and what he can actually raise to finance the film - anyone who works on his films typically takes a big pay cut. In the case of the stars, that usually means working for scale, something they've all mentioned many times in interviews. (Bill Murray on The Grand Budapest Hotel: "It’s this crazy thing where you’re asked to work long hours. You end up spending more money on tips than you make on the movie.”) It can even mean unorthodox demands like having the actors deal with their own make-up, etc. He can get actors to agree to that because of who he is, but it's still asking a lot. It's not like everyone drops everything, pushes potential projects aside and gladly lets their income stream take a huge hit the second he approaches them about a movie he wants to do. Financially, it takes a lot of effort to make these happen.

Second, "hiring a few folks to assemble to footage according to Welles's notes" isn't inaccurate, but it's like saying "you need bypass surgery so let's pay a few folks to get you back on your feet," it glances over a boatload of important details. This is an avant-garde film, how detailed do you think Welles' notes can be? I highly doubt he's got pages telling them exactly which frame of which reel to use at exactly which spot at what duration, if it were that specific, you can probably get anyone who knows how to use the equipment to do it. Furthermore, they're hiring people who have done work on high profile projects, which means not only paying everyone union pay, but setting them up at a post-production house - equipment, time, space, etc. costs a lot of money. If there's anything they need to clear - and in this day and age, a lot of stuff has to be cleared unless you want to deal with more lawsuits - that can cost a lot of money too. (And I'm not talking about ownership rights of the film, I mean mundane stuff that eats up a lot of time and money - if you have something in the background of a shot that's copyrighted, that's something you'd need to clear.) The process of finishing a film - even to just make a DCP - will cost a lot with something that was originally shot on film. It's not like a college student who can just go back to some video footage he has on a hard drive, the on-line process alone will cost a hefty amount of change.

If this was a micro budget film limited to a few festivals, you can probably get away with a lot of stuff, but for something that's (hopefully) going to be made widely available, there's a lot to deal with.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2015 5:37 pm 
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From today's update:

"1) This movie will be made! There’s been some talk recently about the amount of money we’ve raised versus our goal. We want to assure you that your money is NOT going to waste. Every penny we earn on this campaign helps bring us one step closer to bringing this film to life and your contributions are a critical part of that. Even if we do not reach our goal, we will make sure your money is well spent in bringing this instant classic to life."

Also, some details regarding the rights and how this effort is different from previous pre-rights-secured ones. I think they wrote up this article just for you, David. http://filmmakermagazine.com/94552-behi ... YnRDEZGZ0p

Also revealed in that article is that they hired editor Affonso Gonçalves


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2015 6:07 pm 
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Gonçalves was actually confirmed when the campaign was launched. (The NY Times and many other articles mentioned him.)


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2015 6:44 pm 
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hearthesilence wrote:
Gonçalves was actually confirmed when the campaign was launched. (The NY Times and many other articles mentioned him.)

Not sure how I missed that...


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 3:52 pm 

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Wow, it just jumped from 28% to 34% funded. Maybe some big guns are coming out of the woodwork last-minute?

I wish they were just a bit clearer what happens next if it doesn't receive full funding, as still looks likely. The insistence that it will be made! is great and welcome, but what does it entail exactly?


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 4:44 pm 
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Someone dropped $25k for an Associate Producer credit (the first of the producer credits to sell), so that certainly helps.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 1:07 pm 
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A new Wellesnet article reveals that the negative will soon be shipped to Santa Monica and all of the footage will be scanned in 4K to digitally preserve every frame Welles shot. Editing of the film is expected to begin within two weeks.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2015 8:57 am 
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An interview with Jonathan Rosenbaum translated from Italian:

One of the more discouraging interactions, though it appears to pre-date some more recent announcements, and the end of the Kickstarter.

Quote:
In recent months, there has been a lot written – especially in America – about "The Other Side of the Wind" and the attempt to bring it to completion. The film tells the story of an old director, played by John Huston, who dies the same night of his 70th birthday. Welles had designed the narrative according to an alternation between the long night of the birthday party and film segments that the old director was filming. Do you know how this crowdfunding operation to finish "The Other Side of the Wind" is actually going?

Jonathan Rosenbaum: Well, let's just say I can only tell you what the signals are in this regard. I'm supposed to be a consultant for this project, but what I understand from Oja and from other sources is that, at this time they have still not collected all the money needed to complete it. And there is also a problem of contracts that should be negotiated again. The operation is the first of Frank Marshall, who is a producer and has produced many films by, among others, Bogdanovich and Spielberg, so he should already be rich enough. But things still have not been unlocked, and I do not know how much this fundraiser is bearing fruit.

And what about the fact that the fundraiser says that Peter Bogdanovich would be the best person to oversee the final editing of the film?

Jonathan Rosenbaum: I have doubts about that. Oja thinks the same, that Frank Marshall and Peter are the people most suitable to finish the film, but I'm not so convinced. You know, part of the problem in relation to "The Other Side of the Wind", comes from the fact that Oja worked creatively on it, not just because she cooperated with Welles in the drafting of the screenplay and because she plays a role, but also because she directed a sequence.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2015 12:27 pm 
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Jeffrey Wells outlines some problems he's hearing, mostly centered around Oja being Oja. This doesn't sound far-fetched to me, but this delightful line at the end reminds the reader that the keeper of the blog is still a giant asshole:

Quote:
Knowing absolutely nothing, I smell a onetime gold-digger who had a great 24-year ride with one of the most mesmerizing creative malcontents of the 20th Century, but who’s now 74 years old and thinking about security and determined to get all she can while the getting’s good.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 03, 2015 12:25 pm 
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From Wellesnet Facebook:

Quote:
Joseph McBride, arguably the finest Welles scholar today and a co-star in "The Other Side of the Wind," posted the following on his Facebook page: "It's time for the producers to gear up for the inevitable lawsuit against Oja Kodar and Sasha Welles for obstructing the release of THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND. Oja has been doing that for seventeen years now, and the much-ballyhooed announcement a year ago has been for naught. The question of why she has blocked the film will be left for future historians, and her legacy and that of her allies, including some supposed Welles admirers, will not come off well in those assessments. The discovery process should be illuminating. Hopefully the court will award the Sasha-Oja share of the rights to the producers."


I asked Stefan Droessler about a minor contradiction in his lecture vs. McBride's book (as I alluded to in the Welles' thread) and he made a remark that "McBride tells a lot of tales." I wasn't going to share that post, but in light of this, it seems illuminating. From my perspective, those who work closely with Kodar (like Droessler), seem to be on "her side", whereas people not close to her seem to point the blame in her direction for mishandling the Welles legacy.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2016 11:42 am 
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Just thought about this the other day. The comments section shows some growing frustration among contributors about the lack of updates.

Here's Wellesnet's report.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2016 2:42 pm 
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Bogdanovich video interview.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2016 9:01 pm 
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Netflix could be players to get this done.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2016 10:32 pm 
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Jesus, those jackasses have no idea how lucky they are that Netflix is even interested. If they botch this up...


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2016 4:03 am 
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The Kodars are infuriating. They "want the film to be seen" yet can't even allow the negative to be inspected before payment, or be willing to give up the Croatian distribution?

"Oh, I got to stay free in a hotel in LA for months while my aunt refused to comply with the contractual agreement. It was such a burden." Yeah, I feel so sorry for you.

Just take your damn $2+ million at this point and be happy.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2016 4:12 am 
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I'd be amazing to see this done, but I feel the more public interest there is (this time thanks to Netflix's involvement), the more the contracts need to be readjusted because they realize there's more money in it than previously expected.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2016 10:31 am 

Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2007 5:31 am
Releasing a documentary and finished feature simultaneously is inarguably the best way to approach this project. It's the only way to satisfy purists who won't accept a work Welles did not complete himself.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2016 4:25 pm 
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From an e-mail update:

Quote:
Dear Contributors,

Since the end of our Indiegogo campaign on July 6, 2015, we have been diligently exploring means of distribution for the film, so that it can be seen in the best and widest way possible. Naturally, our conversations with potential partners have been confidential, making it impossible to provide you with the timely updates you all deserve. We have been very close, at times a week or weeks away, but, through no fault of our own, those weeks turned into months.

I would like to address a few points:

First and foremost, we are working tirelessly to finish the film.

The perks you selected will be delivered as promised.

We have not received any, formal refund requests and fielded only one such inquiry.

The intense attention the film has received and our long silence have fueled rumors and false news stories, which threaten to jeopardize our plans. Even this update, which is admittedly long overdue, and the frustration being voiced by some fans, however justified, will likely create even more unwanted press … but I owed it to you to break our silence.

As our new partners on this 30-year journey to finish Orson’s final film, I know we all have the film’s best interests at heart. We could not have come this far without your support. I greatly appreciate your patience and hope to share our exciting plans as soon as I am able.

Sincerely,

Filip



This past week has certainly been the most encouraging this film has encountered in the year since its completion was presented as achievable, but you'll have to excuse me for keeping my guard up in the mean time...


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:19 pm 
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The rights have been worked out and Wind will be released by Netflix


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