Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

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domino harvey
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Re: Young Adult (Jason Reitman, 2011)

#1 Post by domino harvey » Tue Jun 28, 2016 12:55 pm

Theron, Reitman, and Cody all reteaming for new film Tully, which will also star Mackenzie Davis from Halt and Catch Fire

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Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#2 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Thu Jan 11, 2018 12:36 pm


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domino harvey
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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#3 Post by domino harvey » Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:43 am


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Luke M
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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#4 Post by Luke M » Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:03 pm

Nothing about this really stands out for me. I keep seeing ads on Facebook and Twitter for it and I sorta want to give it a shot but it looks overwhelmingly mediocre.

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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#5 Post by domino harvey » Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:18 pm

Young Adult was so good, I have hope that there's more to this than it looks

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mfunk9786
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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#6 Post by mfunk9786 » Sat May 05, 2018 6:24 pm

Holy fucking shit.

This is a movie that's nigh impossible to discuss with anyone who hasn't seen it, and once someone has, it's appropriately much more of a solitary experience to let it wash over you and all fall into place. It is sure to be polarizing but something tells me that mothers are going to engage with it on a level that forgives it for the challenges it presents instead of the typical "how dare this movie do this to me" mainstream reaction to a film like this as the credits roll. It takes a concept that would be a solid B+ one for those privileged enough to connect with it and is smart and mature enough to take it to a level where it is widely relatable - that is no small feat considering how its synopsis plays on paper. There is a scene in a public school hallway midway through that is perhaps the film’s most emotional that is absolutely key to Diablo Cody’s mindset here, to her wise decision to make this film have a universal capacity for empathy and not just a selective or idealized one.

Cody has gone from an Oscar winner who most people quickly decided to react to with derision and annoyance to one of our most essential, brilliant screenwriters that might never get the sort of high-level industry gushing she did at the beginning of her career.
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Tully has the unique quality of being an engaging film that you like well enough despite sort of wondering why it got made to being something that you replay in your mind all over again after the big reveal, and it's in the latter process that its genius really starts to take shape. There are not a lot of films that are sort of a gift to your imagination the way this one is.

Question for the next person that winds up contributing their own black box of text - the one thing I didn't absorb fully (and consider a flaw unless someone can explain it to me) is why Drew says at the hospital that Marlo hired a night nanny. Did she just lie to him? Why would she want someone nonexistent to take credit and recognition for her hard work and efforts to remain in control the situation? Is there a psychological explanation for her making that particular choice?
Also, Mackenzie Davis playing a Zach Woods character (look, mannerisms, and all - they could be fraternal twins) is the most unexpected delight of the year so far - and what a year it's been!

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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#7 Post by Drucker » Mon May 07, 2018 10:25 pm

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Finished the movie 20 minutes ago, and am not ready to forgive the reveal at this point. I think I can come around. The first hour and twenty minutes are magnificent. Will it work better on the rewatch? Knowing the twist? Hard to say. The one thing that really doesn't land for me is the mermaid symbolism and imagery.

But the universality of growing up and being okay with it is magnificent. It's actually sort of amazing how the film takes the tone of frustrated new mother, plays it for laughs, plays it for pain, and allows it to evolve with self-discovery. Again--the first bulk of the film is really well done.

The final notes also leave a bad taste in my mouth. Is this about a husband not pulling his share? Why do we need the tragedy? To trigger his involvement? If so, that really wasn't the compelling portion of the film.

Not sold yet. Looking forward to more replies.

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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#8 Post by MongooseCmr » Mon May 07, 2018 11:05 pm

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The twist doesn’t really bother me, largely because no matter how it ended the film had resolved itself the moment Tully arrives. After just the first visit Marlo(we? Somehow a stranger first name than Tully) is sleeping better, dressed better, is more social. The domestic nightmare of the first act transitions to the good mom montage so quickly that I wasn’t sure where the film had left to go beyond pleasantly playing out their friendship. Had Tully just left or died the movie is almost exactly the same to me.

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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#9 Post by mfunk9786 » Tue May 08, 2018 8:47 am

Marlo is not an altogether uncommon first name.

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D50
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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#10 Post by D50 » Tue May 08, 2018 10:39 am

mfunk9786 wrote:
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Tully has the unique quality of being an engaging film that you like well enough despite sort of wondering why it got made to being something that you replay in your mind all over again after the big reveal, and it's in the latter process that its genius really starts to take shape. There are not a lot of films that are sort of a gift to your imagination the way this one is.

Question for the next person that winds up contributing their own black box of text - the one thing I didn't absorb fully (and consider a flaw unless someone can explain it to me) is why Drew says at the hospital that Marlo hired a night nanny. Did she just lie to him? Why would she want someone nonexistent to take credit and recognition for her hard work and efforts to remain in control the situation? Is there a psychological explanation for her making that particular choice?
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Didn't Drew mention the night nanny hiring to Craig at the party during the karaoke scene?

There's a point at the beginning where the entire visual goes from reality to what is seen through Marlo's eyes - we see her sleep deprivation induced postpartum depression associated delusion. Reality picks back up at the hospital after the accident.

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mfunk9786
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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#11 Post by mfunk9786 » Tue May 08, 2018 10:59 am

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My interpretation after thinking about it for a while is that when he says "Oh... really?" or something amounting to that when she says she called the nanny, she likely decided to cancel it and then just not tell him she cancelled it. His reaction made her feel ashamed, and like she had to step up to the plate and do more, and to some degree (although not much, as he mentions not knowing much about the nanny) continue to lie about whether they'd hired one.

I suppose I just see that as the one unnecessary thorn in the plot, but one I'm absolutely willing to forgive the film for, and I understand why it's there as-is. It just seems like an unlikely ruse to be able to keep up for weeks or months, to have someone (however quietly/seamlessly) coming in and out of your home for weeks and have your (however exhausted by work) husband or other children never once even be briefly introduced to this person.

The flashback to Marlo's night out was so effective, showing her choice of bars and drinks and company as so much more tragic than we thought, that while having much of the reality of the film play out in the nuances of Theron's performance and our own imagined recollections of the ways that reality must have differed from what we saw was a smart choice, more flashbacks (though not cut like a Saw coda, please) might not have been an awful idea. As is though, I can forgive the film much of this because it was a rare instance of this kind of plot device being brilliantly used. LQ argued that it was somewhat unforgivable for something that isn't a "genre picture" to try to get away with such a thing, but having it juxtaposed with a film that is supposedly a lightweight domestic drama seemed to be the borderline revolutionary arrow in this film's quiver.

It works, or at least it did for me. The film tricking us into thinking that Marlo is okay and is recovering and has it all together is essential to delivering the overall message in as effective a way as possible, because it puts us in Drew's position as viewers, and causes us to look inward when we need to investigate why it was so easy for the film to make us believe that something like hiring help (which isn't an option for most people anyway) would be a cure-all for anyone, let alone Marlo, who is very clearly overwhelmed - and that point is driven home all the more when one realizes that her true personality lies somewhere closer to Tully's when she's not feeling overwhelmed, so the exhausted, defeated, submerged woman we see in the first act of the film is not just tired, she needs psychological and emotional support from a physician and her family that she is not getting.

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Luke M
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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#12 Post by Luke M » Tue May 08, 2018 7:44 pm

I thought I had seen everything there is to see from Charlize Theron but this was unlike anything she’s done. Her performance felt sincere. This was also the most mature work for both Reitman and Cody. Yes, there’s a shock but it’s played so carefully and doesn’t feel like a trick like in similar movies. The device may be the same but the affect is completely different. Anyway, I thought it was brilliant.

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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#13 Post by DarkImbecile » Wed May 09, 2018 12:41 pm

I know most people have been saying this as kind of a backhanded compliment to offset a lukewarm reaction to Tully as a whole, but I quite liked it and I still think Charlize Theron's performance is far and away the best thing about it, and that she very much needs to be remembered when the time comes for awards consideration.
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I was briefly disappointed by the twist in the moment as well, but very quickly came around to mfunk's reading that it comes only after the film serves up this almost impossibly perfect (and unimaginable for the vast majority of people) solution to a near-universal problem, and the reveal serves as a necessary splash of cold water to the face of that fantasy. The way the reveal reframes everything that came before is enough to make it feel earned: The line that stuck out to me as meaningful when it's said but carries so much more weight post-reveal was Tully's blunt assertion that Marlo wanted to kill her, and Marlo's initial unwillingness to admit it. That's particularly heartbreaking to anyone who's seen firsthand someone struggling with post-partum depression. When considered through the lens of what we discover about her, the thought of Theron cleaning the entire house and making cupcakes that first night with "Tully" or of her state during her karaoke session with her daughter take on so much more emotional resonance that I can't imagine the film isn't more effective on a second viewing.

Funnily enough, during the first third of the movie I actually thought of mfunk's reaction to Unsane - long before it occurred to me that there might be a more direct thematic connection between the two! - in that I thought this was a much more authentic and, on some levels, horrifying representation of severe mental stress that is a common experience for many women trying to keep dozens of balls in the air as a mother, wife, professional, and individual. This film communicates as effectively as I've ever seen it done - especially upon reflection, if not always in the moment - the oppressive weight of all the competing pressures to be the right kind of mother and wife while somehow simultaneously retaining some semblance of the woman she used to be.

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D50
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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#14 Post by D50 » Wed May 09, 2018 1:50 pm

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On my second viewing, one line that stood out for me came from Jonah at the end... Mom, is this real?

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Re: Tully (Jason Reitman, 2018)

#15 Post by wattsup32 » Mon May 14, 2018 8:30 pm

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The "big reveal" in this film can be seen coming from hundreds of miles away. You might easily peg it the first time Tully opens the fridge. If you didn't see it there, you'd have to not be engaging with the film at all to not get it by the time the waitress outfit scene arrives. The film is all the more powerful for telegraphing that "twist" for the careful viewer because it allows you to absorb and sit with the themes and questions it presents while the film is unfolding rather than having to speculate afterwards from memory.
It's not a film that will force a second viewing (like, say, Annihilation from earlier this year), but I suspect it will heavily reward one. I, for one, plan to test that out.

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