The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013)

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Superswede11
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The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013)

#1 Post by Superswede11 » Sun Aug 25, 2013 2:06 pm

Five friends who reunite in an attempt to top their epic pub crawl from 20 years earlier unwittingly become humankind's only hope for survival.

What does everyone think of The World's End? Is it a fitting finale to the "Three Flavours Trilogy"? How does it compare to "Shaun" and "Hot Fuzz"? What did each of the bar names mean? And how did you read the ending?

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jindianajonz
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Re: The World's End (Wright, 2013)

#2 Post by jindianajonz » Sun Aug 25, 2013 10:25 pm

Superswede11 wrote:Five friends who reunite in an attempt to top their epic pub crawl from 20 years earlier unwittingly become humankind's only hope for survival.

What does everyone think of The World's End? Is it a fitting finale to the "Three Flavours Trilogy"? How does it compare to "Shaun" and "Hot Fuzz"? What did each of the bar names mean? And how did you read the ending?
I thought the movie tried to do three different things: It wanted to be funny, it wanted to be suspenseful and actiony, and it wanted to have thematic depth. I felt it was slightly disappointing in the first, fairly disappointed in the second, and had mixed emotions in the third. This may make it sound like a bad film, but it really wasn't- just don't expect comedic and suspense highs that Shaun of the Dead had.

I feel that the lack of comedy was almost by design- from the outset, Simon Pegg played a depressing and pitiful character- but the action scenes really bored me for the most part, and the conclusion
SpoilerShow
with the three protagonists petulantly arguing with the "network" until it just got frustrated and left
was just downright bad.

Thematically, it was a bit on the nose at times, but there was enough complexity to make me feel like I will get some more out of it after seeing it a second time. I thought it was interesting how they tied
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not maturing with not conforming, and took the time to explore the positive and negative aspects of each, but I also came out with a sense that the overall message had been a bit jumbled. Early on Gary was obviously a sad pathetic creature that couldn't escape living in the past, and his decision to not conform/mature/"evolve" led to the end of the world, but this still resulted in happiness for him as he unwittingly stumbled into a happy ending despite the fact that he never really changed.
Still, there were a lot of genuinely good moments, some creative shots, and a few laughs.

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mfunk9786
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Re: The Films of 2013

#3 Post by mfunk9786 » Thu Aug 29, 2013 11:20 am

The World's End really didn't click for me. I didn't dislike it - in fact, it had a lot of charm and humor and creative direction going for it, and was much better than the tone deaf Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, but that isn't saying much. The supernatural premise here never quite fits the through-line of the story, feels unwelcome when it begins, and becomes increasingly less entertaining as time goes on. There are some really tremendous and funny action sequences (typically involving Pegg trying to hang onto his beer), but for the most part, it feels a bit scattered and incomprehensible, particularly towards the very end. The first 30-45 minutes of the film are a treasure, though - and it's one I'll revisit to see if it improves. There's a lot to like here, it just didn't all work for me.
Last edited by mfunk9786 on Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Ibnezra
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Re: The Films of 2013

#4 Post by Ibnezra » Fri Sep 06, 2013 9:11 am

Getting back to "World's End", after a second viewing, the final chapter of the Corenetto trilogy is beginning to grow on me, but any way you slice it, this film is a bit of a disappointment compared to "Shaun of the Dead" and particularly "Hot Fuzz". Don't expect half the laughs, the same level of excitement, or even a margin of the same "biting" social commentary you've derived from the other films, and then it isn't half bad. The whole "starbucking" thing is a compelling observation, I just wish they would have taken the idea to a more interesting place. Coincedentally, wasn't Starbuck the only member of the Pequod's crew to question Ahab's aims and methods, the prevailing order and social dynamic of the world he found himself in? How ironic his name should be turned into a verb describing the action of bringing something into conformity. Melville would probably 'ave a laugh, wun'e?

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