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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2009 4:13 pm 
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Poncho Punch wrote:
Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland is favorite

Yes. Still watch my old VHS.


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2009 6:52 pm 
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I usually test different films on my sister's children (aged 3, 6 and 10) to see how they react. I usually take notes which films they want to see again the next time they are visiting.

Miyazaki films they love. The oldest (a girl) is especially fascinated by Totoro and Howl's Moving Castle. Other Studio Ghibli stuff also does it for them. I also recommend Tokyo Godfathers. Some of the old Finnish films do the trick for the girl too when they are shown on tv but it's more like a culture oriented thingy. She is now interested in how the world looked when her grandmother was her age and so on.

The younger ones (boys) are absolutely fascinated by Pink Panther short films (I strongly recommend the 4 disc box set) and anything with Batman. They don't know a word of English and can't read yet, although they recognize some familiar words, so the subtitles don't mean a lot to them. Still they sat through both Batman Begins and The Dark Knight enjoying them a lot and according to their father, Iron Man is a big hit now in their household. Boys just love to watch everything got beaten up and kicked so I've been thinking about showing them some of the most family oriented Lau-Kar Leung films.

My favorites as a kid were the Marx Brothers and Chaplin but at least The Circus wasn't interesting enough for them. Been thinking about Harold Lloyd, Keaton and Stan & Ollie.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 2:31 pm 
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Ebert on the approaching "Dark Age" of film and youth film lovers (Worth it for the comments, mostly)


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:24 pm 

Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 11:54 am
I guess this is as good of a topic to post my query in as I'll find...

As I've said elsewhere, my wife and I are going to have our first child in a few scant weeks, and like any expectant father, I'd like to raise my son to be a dedicated cinephile. To this end, I plan to decorate his room with several colorful posters of classic children's films. A few months ago I found a link in one of the topics to a simply amazing poster site. Unfortunately, I didn't bookmark it and can no longer find it. Any suggestions on where I might look? Thanks in advance.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:40 pm 
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I'm not sure it fits the billing of "simply amazing poster site," but MovieGoods.com offers a large selection of movie poster reproductions. I know there've been mixed reviews on the quality of the product, but I've always been satisfied. And I wouldn't put anything valuable in a nursery, anyway.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:54 pm 

Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 11:54 am
fiddlesticks wrote:
I'm not sure it fits the billing of "simply amazing poster site," but MovieGoods.com offers a large selection of movie poster reproductions. I know there've been mixed reviews on the quality of the product, but I've always been satisfied. And I wouldn't put anything valuable in a nursery, anyway.


Thanks. I'm pretty sure that this is the one. Oh, and I'm only going for reproductions. At this point I just want him to have something colorful and stimulating to look at.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 11:03 pm 

Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2008 10:02 am
Not sure if this is what you saw, but it is amazing and was posted in one of the threads here: http://www.polishposter.com/. Polish Poster art, most of it fantastic and virtually all of them better than their native counterparts. Of course, some of them might be a little terrifying for a nursery, but I trust you'll use your discretion.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2009 1:46 pm 

Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 11:54 am
bamwc2 wrote:
fiddlesticks wrote:
I'm not sure it fits the billing of "simply amazing poster site," but MovieGoods.com offers a large selection of movie poster reproductions. I know there've been mixed reviews on the quality of the product, but I've always been satisfied. And I wouldn't put anything valuable in a nursery, anyway.

Thanks. I'm pretty sure that this is the one. Oh, and I'm only going for reproductions. At this point I just want him to have something colorful and stimulating to look at.

Thanks again. After perusing their family section, I came across a number of suggestions that were decidedly inappropriate (Bolero, Ordet, etc.), but none are better than this gem on page 17. Oh the possibilities that we could have with that room... :D


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2009 12:57 pm 
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Glenn Kenny's rebuttal to the Ebert piece.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:25 am 
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First off, I want to apologise to the board if this thread is in the wrong section of the forum.

I have a simple problem that I am struggling to find an answer for. My cousin has two little girls, ages 3 and 6. The 6 year old has a birthday approaching (meaning the 3 year old will need a present too) and she / they love watching movies, particularly the Ghibli collection, Pixar and Disney.

I've pretty much run out of suitable Ghibli films to buy them now, and they have all of the Pixar films and a majority of the Disney collection (though my cousin asked me not to get anything overtly romantic as they are in all kinds of strife with the girls at the moment, due to their new found necessity for having fiancée's...it has gotten to the point that the school has bought my cousin and her husband in for a "chat" to discuss the relentless kissing, hugging and holding hands from each of the girls and their respective beau's...particularly that Liam the Frenchman!). They are extremely fond of cartoon animals and magical creatures, as well as children protagonists (notably other little girls they can relate to) but i'm not sure how much they enjoy non-animated films. They are New Zealanders living in Hong Kong (where the girls were born and raised), and speak fluent english and low-level cantonese, but for some reason like watching cartoons in Japanese (my cousin is fluent in Japanese so explains bits and peices to them now and again when they ask what's happening) though they will watch in English too.

I'm not very fluent in children's films, and the obvious selection (the Ghibli's, Pixar, Dreamworks, Disney etc etc) is beginning to dry up leaving films that may not be appropriate (Grave of the Fire Flies, Pom Poko (too many testicles...or am i being too prudish?) etc). Other animation I have seen may go straight over their heads or be too adult orientated, such as the Laloux films, The Girl Who Leapt Through Time, Satashi Kon is a big no-no, and the manga I have seen is certainly not suitable, though I know very little about what is offer of Manga and there could very well be some great films for young girls.

In terms of non-animated films, I won't rule them out, but again, i'm not sure they're very focussed outside of animation. The more animals, excitement, and fascinating creatures colliding with children the better. Perhaps songs too, as they are often bursting into medleys of the My Neighbour Totoro theme combined with Mamma Mia songs.

I would greatly appreciate any input anyone has. I'm almost certain I saw another thread on this board (in fact i'm sure I commented in it once) but haven't been able to locate it, so I apologise to the mods if this needs shifting to another thread.

Many thanks,
P

EDIT: Thanks for shifting, apologies.
P


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 11:06 am 
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have you tracked down the early Takahata (with Miyazaki as art director) Panda kopanda (there's a subbed Japanese DVD -- not sure about HK or elsewhere)?

There's lots of much-loved animation for children in Japan -- but little is available with subs. So far as I know, one simply get subbed versions of Heidi, anne of Green Gables or Marco in Search of his mOther (all by Takahata) or Miyazaki's Future Boy Conan.

There has also been a couple of Moomin series (inspired by Tove Jansson's stories), also never subbed.

A disrecommendation -- Junkers, Come Here (which, perversely enough, IS available subbed).


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 11:45 am 
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The two Michel Ocelot films that are available in English - Kirikou and the Sorceress and Azur and Asmar: The Prince's Quest - have been huge hits with my kids (six and four), though some parents have a problem with the nudity (copious in Kirikou, breastfeeding in Azur).

My wife's a midwife, so to say she's unfazed is a bit of an understatement - in fact she thinks there's not enough casual, clearly unsexualised nudity in the kids' other films, but I'm aware this may be a minority opinion.


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 11:57 am 
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I had thought about the Ocelot films -- but felt the kids might be too young for these,

I think at least some of Frederic Back's short films (box set available from www.archambault.ca) could be enjoyed by little kids -- and some of Yuri Norstein's (only available used at the moment, it would seem), though NOT Tale of Tales.


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 12:34 pm 
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Location: Reading, UK
Michael Kerpan wrote:
have you tracked down the early Takahata (with Miyazaki as art director) Panda kopanda (there's a subbed Japanese DVD -- not sure about HK or elsewhere)?

There's lots of much-loved animation for children in Japan -- but little is available with subs. So far as I know, one simply get subbed versions of Heidi, anne of Green Gables or Marco in Search of his mOther (all by Takahata) or Miyazaki's Future Boy Conan.

There has also been a couple of Moomin series (inspired by Tove Jansson's stories), also never subbed.

A disrecommendation -- Junkers, Come Here (which, perversely enough, IS available subbed).

Thanks very much for the recommendations / disrecommendations (It's always appreciated to have a heads up) Michael. To be honest I haven't been sure weather Takahata would have been up their street, other than Pom Poko, but I will definitely look into his earlier works. I've only seen the easily available of his (Little Norse Prince, Grave of the Fireflies, My Neighbours the Yamada's, Pom Poko) and whilst I love them all (in particular the Yamada's), I've felt from those that he was perhaps more experimental and serious (...Fireflies is a red herring obviously, but Pom Poko was, I felt fairly heavy with it's subtext into developmental change in japan, and Yamada's was actually a very moving Ozu-esque perception of the family unit that I wasn't sure would be too much for girls of that age) than any of the other director's in the Ghibli (and pre-ghibli) workshop. I think the problem I have is I watch a certain film one way and find it hard to know if a film, animated or otherwise, would appeal to a child, particularly a little girl. I also have to be pretty careful not to send them stuff that will scare them (I was hesitant about Howl's which could have at times particularly scared the little one), mainly for the obvious reason that they aren't my kids. I think this view may have made me a little too hesitant to send some films over which are actually fine and they would love. And as far as unsubbed goes, that is great to have some options to look for too. Many thanks for those, I may see how available these films are in Hong Kong and buy online from a local e-tailer there and get them sent direct to the house.

MichaelB wrote:
The two Michel Ocelot films that are available in English - Kirikou and the Sorceress and Azur and Asmar: The Prince's Quest - have been huge hits with my kids (six and four), though some parents have a problem with the nudity (copious in Kirikou, breastfeeding in Azur).

My wife's a midwife, so to say she's unfazed is a bit of an understatement - in fact she thinks there's not enough casual, clearly unsexualised nudity in the kids' other films, but I'm aware this may be a minority opinion.

Thanks MichaelB for those recommendations too. I've actually been looking to get those myself soon as I know very little about Michel Ocelot, and reading about these films greatly piqued my interest. I'm not sure if nudity is an issue, it's something I will have to check with my cousin first (though she's very relaxed about everything so I doubt it will be an problem), but I've had those in mind as an option, so I may actually get a hold of them myself in the next week and give them a watch and see how they fare. As I stated above, I find it hard going trying to relate to (particularly) little girls way of seeing. They love anything magical, with bright colours and young protagonists who enjoy a bit of song and dance, which is cool, but it's when things may become too scary that I find myself in a bit of a 'do I, don't I' purchasing conundrum. I actually bought them The Wizard of Oz last Christmas, then last minute switched it for Kiki's and The Cat Returns and kept The Wizard of Oz myself just because I didn't want to find out i'd given them both nightmares and fall into the family bad-books. But i'll definitely watch these films myself and see what they are like as your kids are of about the same age as the girls, which definitely gives a good sign that they will enjoy too.

Many thanks guys,
P


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 12:41 pm 
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I think a 6 year-old would find things to enjoy in Takhata's Yamadas. Grave and Pom Poko (and Norse Prince) might be too much. Once the kids are just a bit older, I'd recommend Takahata's wonderful Gauche the Cellist.


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 1:12 pm 
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I was actually thinking of re-watching My Neighbour the Yamada's as I haven't seen it for a long time and think I may have the wrong impression of it's seriousness. I remember there being much to make me laugh throughout and the creativity (of animation and the loose vignette style) may actually enthrall them.

The Little Norse Prince has a cold, fairly crude, haunting atmosphere (shared by Mononoke I felt) that i think particularly the youngest may not like or might be to heavy going for. Grave of the Fireflies is certainly heavy going, even for adults. I've seen it a few times, and actually find myself choking up in the first scene nowadays, with the disregard of the importance of the sweet tin by the station warden. Although it is an unquestionably important film, I think my cousin would never forgive me for that one. And with Pom Poko, it has that subtext which I fully appreciate being brought into animation (it is something that particularly Japanese film in general does very well and is very rare to see in American or British film - with one noted exception of Pawel Pawilowski in the Uk) but i'm not sure would lose the girls attention, and honestly, I just can't get passed the tanuki testicles (and dread getting an angry phone call that they just had to explain what balls are to a 3 and a 6 year old).

Actually, Michael I was wondering if you have perhaps seen Tomomi Mochizuki's Ocean Waves (Umi ga kikoeru) 1993, which is on the cards from Optimum according to a catalogue I recieved recently? I know the girls loved Whisper of the Heart, and was curious if this would be of a similar style and mood that would appeal, depending on it's release date?

I'll start looking around for some of the Takahata's that you mentioned and see how it goes with those and the Ocelot's i'll get a hold of. Thanks again for the input.

P


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 1:48 pm 
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bigP wrote:
Actually, Michael I was wondering if you have perhaps seen Tomomi Mochizuki's Ocean Waves (Umi ga kikoeru) 1993, which is on the cards from Optimum according to a catalogue I recieved recently? I know the girls loved Whisper of the Heart, and was curious if this would be of a similar style and mood that would appeal, depending on it's release date?
while I highly recommend Ocean Waves -- for you -- it would not interest kids much. It depicts young people at the end of high school and beginning of college -- and is aimed at older teens (not much that is risque -- but just not too interesting for youngsters).

I think there is a DVD out with Osamu Tezuka short films -- more arty than Jungle Emperor -- but not much in the way of talk -- and some sould appeal to kids -- like Jumping.


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 1:12 pm 
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I've been looking at picking up the Osamu Tezuka shorts from Director's Suite R4 for a while now, but i've not yet seen anything by him at all (not even Astroboy which is high on my list). I'll definitely want to see this for myself so might keep this in mind as her birthday is not until November, so I 'll have time to pick it up and give it a spin first. I see Madman have a complete collection of Kimba The White Lion. Sorry to keep pushing questions to you Michael, but if you have seen the series, is this something that would have an appeal to a 6/7 year old? I'm guessing that being a pre-cursor to Jungle Emperor, it is fairly straight-forward going, very story based and lots of cute animals for kids to look at, but wondering about lasting appeal past the first disc?

Thanks for the advice on Ocean Waves; seems like something I want to see for sure, but it definitely sounds like it may be a little too hard for a 6/7 year old to relate to. I've just had a look and the DVD has been pushed back until January so this isn't a problem anyway, but I've added it to my pre-orders.

P


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 1:16 pm 
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I _think_ Kimba and Jungle Emperor are one and the same. I haven't actually seen this (except for some clips). Definitely kid-oriented -- so far as I can recall. My recollections of Astroboy are very vague -- just a show my little brother and sister watched (which I mostly ignored).


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 4:55 pm 
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Many thanks for your help Michael Kerpan & Michael B. Just to let you know I ended up buying blind, Azur & Asmar:The Princes Quest (my cousin said the breast feeding incident should be fine if it's a 'U') for the oldest and Panda! Go Panda! for the young'un which was available from Manga in the UK (though I have no idea on the quality, so fingers crossed it's nice and bright for them).

Thanks again for the advice chaps. Very much appreciated.

Paul.


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Mon Oct 26, 2009 10:31 pm 
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Brave Little Toaster - mfunk reminded me of it in the Where the Wild Things Are thread, and ever since I've been watching clips of it on youtube. From the cars singing "Worthless" in the junkyard to the air conditioner committing suicide, the film uses its Disney animation as a facade for much larger themes of abandonment and loneliness. I used to watch it all the time when I was a kid and now revisiting it I love it even more, even the songs have held up.

Too bad though about the terrible sequels, oh well...


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:53 am 
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Martin Scorsese lists his 11 favorite family films in Newsweek. It's a great list. I own and love them all, save Jack Clayton's Our Mother's House, which I've never heard of. It doesn't seem to be available on video in either the U.S. or U.K.


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 1:01 pm 
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It's great to see two Reed films on there- and I'm delighted every time someone points out what a great, weird kid's movie Curse of the Cat People is. I should get my hands on the Mackendrick, I'd always heard it referred to as a middling work but now I'm excited to see it.


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 2:20 pm 
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matrixschmatrix wrote:
and I'm delighted every time someone points out what a great, weird kid's movie Curse of the Cat People is.

...on top of being, appropriately enough, a great Christmas movie.


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 Post subject: Re: Films for Children
PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 2:47 pm 
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matrixschmatrix wrote:
It's great to see two Reed films on there- and I'm delighted every time someone points out what a great, weird kid's movie Curse of the Cat People is. I should get my hands on the Mackendrick, I'd always heard it referred to as a middling work but now I'm excited to see it.

The Mackendrick is one of his best films and Eureka recently put out a very nice DVD. It manages that specific sort of somber tone that can only be achieved by looking through a child's eye.


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