Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

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piano player
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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#126 Post by piano player » Tue Feb 16, 2010 4:07 pm

I have a question of sorts. You know in the final scene, where Bill/Alice are walking around the toy store with the kid, you see all these circular patterns (and lights forming a pantheon-like structure with doric columns) and the words "The Magic Circle" written pretty much everywhere. Is this an allusion to the circle ritual that took place at the mansion the night before?

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mfunk9786
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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#127 Post by mfunk9786 » Tue Feb 16, 2010 5:49 pm

That's what I always figured - in addition to the circular nature of the plot of the film. Bill's discoveries and experiences have led him back right where he started, and I always figured that was the whole point of the film. But maybe I need to read a lot further into it, you might not want to take my word for it.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#128 Post by Noiretirc » Wed Feb 17, 2010 1:12 am

karmajuice wrote:The perfect example of this is the orgy set piece. I was riveted throughout the scene, it was so beautifully crafted, so strange and exotic, so enigmatic. The masks, the blood red of the carpet, the elegance of the rooms, the slow course of the wandering camera, the detached voyeurism. I loved it. But the scenes was also completely silly -- intentionally, I think. That is to say, the scene isn't silly, but the circumstances that the scene depicts are silly: a bunch of old rich people playing dress-up with secret passwords, an extravagant ritual, unerotic sex. This scene is both scary and stupid, in the sense that what it depicts has the capacity to be both scary and stupid.
Bwa ha ha....stop it.....I'm in tears.......

Seriously though, I find a few funny/comedic moments in every Kubrick, but EWS especially had me shitting myself. The scene where Cruise stands disrobed and unmasked completely fucked me up.....scary beyond comprehension.......


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moviscop
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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#130 Post by moviscop » Sun Oct 28, 2012 12:17 am

If you haven't already checked out "Unseen Reflections" by Rob Ager, I recommend either finding a link online or ordering the DVD (which I did). Unlike most film scholars, his analysis comes from years of Kubrick research and a lot of time in the archives.

Without giving too much away for those watching it, he draws many parallels to the almost gapless trajectory of the characters in what seems to be them running on an inverted circuit. While not quite as interesting as his view of the gold standard in "The Shining", it is still well worth the watch.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#131 Post by oh yeah » Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:40 am

I'm not too crazy for Ager's piece, as I remember it from when it was still free. To be sure, he makes some good insights, but it's all pretty standard and rote stuff, nothing I hadn't read elsewhere or thought of myself. Anyway as long as we're talking EWS analyses, I particularly enjoy this extremely (perhaps over-) long, digressive but extremely insightful and entertainingly written scene-by-scene analysis.

Then of course there's Tim Kreider's influential sociological piece. Or Jamie Stuart's more wide-reaching but nonetheless astute essay. And here, a more obscure one, which makes a fascinating connection to Borges that I think is really spot on.

Can you tell I'm maybe just a little bit obsessed? (It is my favorite film, if that makes it any more understandable...)

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#132 Post by VanzettiMolecule88 » Tue Mar 19, 2013 2:27 am

Hi all,

I'm new here. I really enjoyed EWS. A question for those people who really have an eye for detail. There was a scene in the movie where one sees the street called "Wren St.", but there was another street..I think it was directly opposite Wren St. I looked at the scenes w/ Wren Street probably 100x and I thought I saw a street called "Glover Ave". or "Glover Rd"? Does anyone see this street name also? There is one scene where when the cab w/ Dr. Harford pulls up you can see the cross street. Anyone? Thank you.

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mfunk9786
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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#133 Post by mfunk9786 » Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:03 am

Not sure the answer, but just so you know, this was not shot in New York City.

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Roger Ryan
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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#134 Post by Roger Ryan » Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:31 am

mfunk9786 wrote:Not sure the answer, but just so you know, this was not shot in New York City.
Specifically, the second unit shot a few establishing shots around the New York area as well as the background plates for the rear projection car scenes. Everything else was shot in England. I believe the street sign posts are simply set dressing placed where ever those scenes were shot.

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Graham
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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#135 Post by Graham » Thu Mar 21, 2013 2:22 pm

Also, the street signs are for roads that don't actually exist, at least according to Martin Scorsese in a documentary on the EWS blu-ray that I watched the other night.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#136 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Thu Mar 21, 2013 11:40 pm

Is the mask on the pillow when he comes back home a gesture from them of threat or was she actually there, and this was her way of shoving his face in it?

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#137 Post by The Doogster » Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:13 am

flyonthewall2983 wrote:Is the mask on the pillow when he comes back home a gesture from them of threat or was she actually there, and this was her way of shoving his face in it?
She is telling him she was there. Kubrick was a little clumsy in this scene, because it's not clear exactly what the mask signifies (unlike the book, where it's clear the mask is to show her presence at the orgy). This aspect of the story would be more believable if Nicole Kidman were a little more, ahem, well endowed. If she had been at the orgy she would have stood out like a sore thumb.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#138 Post by greggster59 » Fri Mar 22, 2013 8:33 am

Look again.
The mask on the pillow was part of the costume Cruise's rented costume which he stashed in his apartment the next day.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#139 Post by Roger Ryan » Fri Mar 22, 2013 8:51 am

greggster59 wrote:Look again.
The mask on the pillow was part of the costume Cruise's rented costume which he stashed in his apartment the next day.
Right, my understanding of the scene (and I mean the scene in the film, not the source novel) is that Kidman has found the costume and absconds with the mask before Cruise returns the costume to the rental business. She then leaves the mask on Cruise's pillow as a passive-aggressive way of telling him "I know you're keeping things from me; you're hiding behind a mask". Keep in mind that Kidman is home with the couple's daughter the night Cruise begins his sexually-frustrated odyssey; she's not going to leave the daughter home alone to journey out to some estate at 2 a.m. nor is it likely she would find a sitter at that hour.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#140 Post by mfunk9786 » Fri Mar 22, 2013 12:16 pm

Gosh, if the mask is to signify that she was there, that is some clumsy storytelling, and it was right of Kubrick to leave it ambiguous. Why would Kidman's character, with what we know about her active fantasy life that hasn't been acted upon, be at a secret orgy full of prostitutes? Quite frankly, I always took the mask's presence as a threat by the folks behind the party - because it's followed by Cruise coming clean to Kidman, who was visibly shaken by the admission.

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Roger Ryan
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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#141 Post by Roger Ryan » Fri Mar 22, 2013 12:36 pm

Again, the most logical explanation for Cruise's mask to show up on his pillow is that Kidman placed it there herself. Kubrick is careful to show that Cruise hides the bag with the costume in the apartment and, then later, retrieves the bag to take to the rental store. In between these two moments, it's possible that Kidman found the bag and removed the mask. Cruise finally breaks down when he realizes that Kidman knows about the costume rental and is "confronting" him by placing the mask on his pillow.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#142 Post by greggster59 » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:09 pm

Roger Ryan wrote:Again, the most logical explanation for Cruise's mask to show up on his pillow is that Kidman placed it there herself. Kubrick is careful to show that Cruise hides the bag with the costume in the apartment and, then later, retrieves the bag to take to the rental store. In between these two moments, it's possible that Kidman found the bag and removed the mask. Cruise finally breaks down when he realizes that Kidman knows about the costume rental and is "confronting" him by placing the mask on his pillow.
Indeed. Clumsy and Kubrick are not words that really go together once he got past his 'student' film period (Fear & Desire and Killer's Kiss). If the mask is there it is for a good reason.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#143 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:16 pm

I was 15 when I saw it and really haven't revisited it, but I thought it was the other scenario I posited back then really until watching some Kubrick docs lately on YouTube. It's too much of a bad thriller cliche that someone from the party put it on the pillow as a threat to him and his family.

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AK
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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#144 Post by AK » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:38 pm

I think Alice found the mask and placed in on the pillow. I don't think the powers behind the curtain would've placed it there, but I think that it's actually a great sign of Kubrick's genius in ambiguity that not only might it occur to Bill but it certainly has occurred to some viewers (myself included) whether it was actually placed there as the final warning. Kubrick beautifully refers to things that are not there (that were there or might never have been there in the first place) throughout the film, and it's one - if not the greatest - motif that runs throughout the film. It's like we're seeing not one but multiple films at the same time, each complementing one another but still swerving to unexpected directions.

I can see Alice finding the mask, realizing it is Bill's, placing it on her husband's pillow as a token of her then realizing there is something in Bill she is not aware of. Of course it'll come as a surprise (or not?) to Alice as to how far Bill actually went.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#145 Post by The Doogster » Sat Mar 23, 2013 2:46 am

greggster59 wrote:Look again.
The mask on the pillow was part of the costume Cruise's rented costume which he stashed in his apartment the next day.
Well spotted. I read the book when the movie came out. The human mind is a strange thing, and my mind obviously played a trick on me...

Anyway, I dug out my copy of Dream Story by Arthur Schnitzler (trans J Davies). Here is the final chapter:

**********************************************

He [Fridolin] hurried home through the dark deserted streets, and a few minutes later, having undressed in his consulting-room as he had done twenty-four hours earlier, he entered the marital bedroom as quietly as possible.

He could hear Albertine's [his wife's] calm, regular breathing and see the outline of her head silhouetted against the soft pillow. A feeling of tenderness and of security he had not expected overwhelmed him. And he resolved to tell her the whole story quite soon, perhaps even tomorrow, but as if everything he had experienced had only been a dream - and then, when she had felt and acknowledged the insignificance of his adventure, he would confess that it had indeed been real. Real? he asked himself - and at that moment became aware of something very close to Albertine's face on the other pillow. on <i>his</i> pillow, something dark and quite distinct, like the shadowy outline of a human face. His heart stood still for an instant until he grasped the situation, and, reaching out, he seized the mask he had worn the previous evening, which evidently had slipped out without his noticing that morning as he rolled up his costume, and which the chambermaid or even Albertine herself must have then found. So he could scarcely doubt that after this discovery Albertine must suspect something, and conceivably worse things than had actually happened. Yet the way she had chosen to let him know this, the idea of laying out the dark mask on the pillow next to her, as if to represent his, her husband's face, which had become a riddle to her, this witty, almost light-hearted approach, which seemed to contain both a mild warning and a willingness to forgive, gave Fridolin reason to hope that, remembering her own dream, she would be disposed not to take whatever might have happened all that seriously. But then suddenly, feeling utterly exhausted, Fridolin let the mask slip to the floor and to his own surprise broke into loud, heart-rending sobs, sank down beside the bed and wept quietly into the pillow.

A few seconds later he felt a soft hand stroking his hair. he raised his head and from the bottom of his heart cried, "I'll tell you everything."

At first she gently raised her hand as if to prevent him, but he seized it and held it in his own, both questioning her and pleading with her as he looked up, so she nodded her consent and he began.

By the time Fridolin had ended the first grey light of dawn was coming through the curtains. Albertine had not once interrupted him with curious or impatient questions. She seemed to sense that he had no desire to conceal anything from her, and he was indeed unable to. She lay there quietly, her hands behind her neck, and remained silent a long time after Fridolin had finished. At last - he had been lying stretched out by her side - he bent over her and, gazing into her impassive face and large bright eyes, in which the day now seemed to be dawning too, asked hesitantly yet full of hope, "What should we do, Albertine?"

She smiled, hesitated briefly, then answered, "I think we should be grateful to fate that we've emerged safely from these adventures - both from the real ones and from those we dreamed about."

"Are you quite sure of that?" he asked.

"As sure as I am of my sense that neither the reality of a single night nor even of a person's entire life can be equated with the full truth about his innermost being."

"And no dream," he sighed quietly, "is altogether a dream."

She took his head in both her hands and pillowed it tenderly against her breast. "Now we're truly awake," she said, "at least for a good while." He wanted to add: for ever. But before he had a chance to speak, she laid a finger on his lips and whispered as though to herself, "Never inquire into the future."

And so they both lay there in silence, both dozing now and then, yet dreamlessly close to one another - until, as every morning at seven, there was knock upon the bedroom door and, with the usual noises from the street, a triumphant sunbeam coming in between curtains, and a child's gay laughter from the adjacent room, another day began.

**********************************************

Kubrick's and Raphael's screenplay converts this scene to:

SCENE 132. INT BEDROOM - BILL AND ALICE'S APARTMENT - NIGHT

BILL quietly opens the bedroom door. To his dismay, he sees the mask on the pillow next to ALICE [my note - Bill realises he lost the mask in scene 95, but put it down to an accidental loss]. BILL, emotionally wrecked, walks slowly towards the bed and sits down with tears in his eyes. Finally, he can restrain himself no longer, and breaks down into uncontrollable sobbing. ALICE wakes to see BILL'S complete helplessness as he collapses and lays her head on his breast. She puts an arm around him as he sobs.

BILL - I'll tell you everything. I'll tell you everything.

Etc, etc

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#146 Post by VanzettiMolecule88 » Sat Mar 23, 2013 5:01 pm

"Also, the street signs are for roads that don't actually exist, at least according to Martin Scorsese in a documentary on the EWS blu-ray that I watched the other night."

Yes..yes, I know this. Thank you. But does anyone notice a street with the name "Glover" in it? It's fairly brief. I'm curious to know if it's in the film..real or fictional street..it doesn't matter to me

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#147 Post by Being » Wed Sep 07, 2016 8:59 pm

Antoine Doinel wrote:Vinessa Shaw recalls her time on the set of Eyes Wide Shut.
Very amusing interview. The domino scene is one of my favorites of the film, and her dialogue with Bill cracks me up.

DOMINO: That depends on what you wanna do. What do you want to do?

BILL: Well, uh, what do you recommend?

DOMINO (giggles): What do I recommend? Uhm...hmmm...
EWS is my second-favorite of Kubrick's films, and sometimes I wonder if it will eventually become #1. The process he used for filming EWS should be studied by all directors and filmmakers. He really went to the extremes in terms of time spent, number of takes, intimacy and partnership with actors, and so on. EWS is a master filmmaker at the zenith of his knowledge.

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#148 Post by copen » Wed Sep 07, 2016 9:51 pm

I recently came across this
http://idyllopuspress.com/idyllopus/fil ... d_half.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
In the 2nd half of the film he revisits many places where he went in the 1st half. The above article has the video and describes the actual timings of many incidents taking place at the same time in both halfs, i.e. he sits at the prostitute's table at exactly the same time in both halfs of the film.
The videos:
part 1
https://vimeo.com/123297180" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

part 2
https://vimeo.com/123674318" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#149 Post by domino harvey » Wed Sep 07, 2016 10:00 pm

△△△ Illuminati Confirmed △△△ demrifnoC itanimullI △△△

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Re: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)

#150 Post by oh yeah » Wed Sep 07, 2016 11:21 pm

All that makes me think of is how this movie was stupendous enough on LSD when watched normally -- I can't imagine seeing it in such a state with the images overlaid like that.

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