Korea Society Film Screenings & Events (NYC)

Discuss films and filmmakers of the 20th century (and even a little of the 19th century). Threads may contain spoilers.
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lady wakasa
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Korea Society Film Screenings & Events (NYC)

#1 Post by lady wakasa » Sun Aug 26, 2007 10:23 pm

Classic Korean Films at The Korea Society

Not sure if this has been mentioned here - I searched and couldn't find it - but the 7th Annual New York Korean Film Festival is currently going on. A brief synopsis of what it's about:

The New York Korean Film Festival (NYKFF) is the premiere venue for Korean cinema in the United States, and the event through which dozens of Korean blockbusters have made their North American premieres. Organized by The Korea Society, this year's Festival is proudly sponsored by Korean telecommunications company Helio and the Korean Film Council.

This year's festival runs from August 21st to September 2nd and features 20 current and classic films. It also includes opening and closing night parties, Korean Horror Nights (sponsored by Tartan Asian Extreme), an Im Kwon-Taek retrospective, a shorts min-festival (free!), and a Q&A with Kim Yong-hwa, director of 200 Pound Beauty.

Venues include the IFC Center, Cinema Village, and the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

I went last year, and I've been helping out this year. It's a great way to catch a number of movies that would otherwise only appear on region-3 DVD, and to catch them not long after they've played in Korea. (Plus I think most people here would definitely appreciate them.)

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#2 Post by hot_locket » Mon Aug 27, 2007 12:32 am

Why isn't I'm a Cyborg But That's OK a part of this?

It's only been shown once in the States so far, hasn't it?

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#3 Post by lady wakasa » Tue Aug 28, 2007 10:30 pm

hot_locket wrote:Why isn't I'm a Cyborg But That's OK a part of this?

It's only been shown once in the States so far, hasn't it?
The only showing I know about was at the NY Asian Film Festival a couple months back.

I don't really know - maybe the distributors weren't interested in making it available right now, maybe there's some licensing issue, maybe the thought is to wait until it's closer to being released commercially in the US. (The festival's also supposed to represent what's popular in Korea and, while it's a great movie, I'm A Cyborg was NOT popular domestically.) Then again, King and the Clown could have been shown last year but wasn't, so maybe Cyborg will show next year.

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Secret Sunshine (Chang-dong Lee, 2007)

#4 Post by tugboat5555 » Sun Apr 20, 2008 7:10 pm

For those of you who haven't seen Chang-dong Lee's Secret Sunshine (me included), it's playing at the Asia Society in NY on May 7th.

More info here.

It's a small retrospective, so they are playing Chang-Dong's other 3 films (Green Fish, Peppermint Candy, Oasis) as well. I guess he's doing the "Society" circuit (just finished a run at the Korea Society).

As it stands, Secret Sunshine is without distributor, so it's as good a time as any to see it. I am a huge fan of Oasis I am ecstatic for this.

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2008 New York Korean Film Festival

#5 Post by yuni_ny » Tue Jul 08, 2008 3:14 pm

New York Korean Film Festival is the largest showcase of its kind in North America. With the most anticipated 14 fantastic feature films, enticing panel discussions, short film festival, and more, the New York Korean Film Festival is back for the eighth straight year. This year the festival will run from August 22nd to August 31st at the Cinema Village in downtown Manhattan and BAM Cinematek in Brooklyn. A full schedule of screenings and events is available at www.koreanfilmfestival.org.

Since 2001, the New York Korean Film Festival has been the premiere venue for Korean cinema in the United States. Every year it has been the home to numerous International Premieres and North American Premieres. The Festival is a vital event, and shows Americans that Korea has an important role to play in world culture. This film festival is organized by The Korea Society.

We cordially invite you to join us as we start off what is sure to be an amazing festival. We are pleased to announce that this year's Opening Reception will be held at The Times Center on August 21st, and Opening Party at the Hiro Ballroom in Chelsea on August 22nd. Prominent Korean actor Ahn Sung-ki will be in attendance and take part in a retrospective that honors his long career on the world stage. This retrospective will include four of his most successful films, Warriors, Our Joyful Young Days, Radio Star, and Nowhere to Hide.

Korean films are branching out and becoming more innovative and this year’s feature films fully exemplify this change. Mind-bending thrillers like Epitaph (starring Kim Tae-woo, Kim Bo-kyung) to films based on true unique Korean experiences as in My Father (Daniel Henney, Kim Young-cheol) and Forever the Moment (Moon So-ri, Kim Jeong-eun) all find a place in this year’s lineup. A Love (Joo Jin-mo, Park Si-yeon), a complicated romance offers a nice contrast to the dangerous Open City (Kim Myung-min, Son Ye-jin) and Virgin Snow (Lee Jun-ki, Miyazaki Aoi) a cross-cultural love that is captured on film.

There is also a host of films that portrays Korea’s changing culture from past to present Hwang Jin-Yi (Song Hye-gyo, Yoo Ji-tae) and Hellcats (Lee Mi-sook, Kim Min-hee). Also, Korea’s rich history is majestically told in May 18 (Kim Sang-kyung, Ahn Sung-ki). From the comedy Going by the Book (Jung Jae-young, Son Byung-ho) to the action-packed Spare (Jung Woo, Lim Jun-il), this year’s festival has it all. All films will be shown in the original Korean with English subtitles. If you have any questions, or inquiry, please contact us anytime (press@koreanfilmfestival.org).

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Re: Classic Korean Films at The Korea Society

#6 Post by fiddlesticks » Wed Mar 04, 2009 6:48 pm

If you ever hear that I've moved to New York, it'll have been because I wanted to be closer to the Korea Society so I could go to these screenings.

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Screening at The Korea Society

#7 Post by yuni_ny » Mon Jul 06, 2009 4:34 pm

The Korea Society's monthly Classic Movie Night series of films set during the period of Japanese occupation will continue next Thursday, July 16th, 2009 at 6:30 PM with this the oldest Korean talkie film by director Yang Joo-nam.

Hurrah! For Freedom
Director: Choi In-kyu
Starring Jeon Chang-geun and Yoo Kye-sun
51 minutes (1946)
Korean with English Subtitles

Choi Han-joong escapes from a Japanese prison where he has been held for his pro-independence activities. He finds refuge in the home of an attractive young nurse—but where do her loyalties lie? Hurrah! For Freedom was released shortly after the August 15 liberation, but the surviving print represents only a part of director Choi In-kyu's original vision. Government censors substantially edited the re-release print in the 1970s, leaving a shorter film and hints of the artistic achievement he would achieve in later films like Homeless Angel.

Sweet Dream
Director: Yang Joo-nam
Starring Cho Taek-won, Moon Yae-bong
46 minutes (1936)
Korean with English Subtitles

As Korean cinema's first "talkie," Sweet Dream nearly left audiences speechless with its scandalous melodrama about a wife who abandons her family to live with another man.

â–  When: Thursday, July 16 at 6:30 PM
â–  Where: The Korea Society
8th Floor, 950 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022

Join us each month for Classic Movie Night, and screenings are followed by a brief lecture and Q & A. Light refreshments will be served.

More information at http://www.koreasociety.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; or RSVP to yuni.ny@koreasociety.org

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Crossroads of Youth (An Jong-hwa, 1934)

#8 Post by yuni_ny » Wed Sep 16, 2009 11:37 am

KOREA’S OLDEST SURVIVING SILENT FILM TO BE SCREENED AT THE NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

Digitally Restored Historic Film to be Accompanied by Live Music and Narration

New York, NY–September, 16–The Korea Society and the Film Society of Lincoln Center will take audiences to a bygone era when they present Korea's oldest surviving silent film, Crossroads of Youth, accompanied by musicians and live narrators (byeonsa) of the type found in Korean theaters of the 1930s. This special screening event will take place at 11:00 AM on October 3, in Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, as part of the 47th New York Film Festival.

Released in 1934 and recently digitally restored, Crossroads of Youth is a wrenching family tragedy set against the backdrop of Korea's jarring modernization. To better recreate the original film experience for modern audiences, the film will be accompanied by live musicians, playing period and contemporary music before, during and after the film. Live, dramatic narrators, called byeonsa, will also recap the plot and give voice to the characters' inner thoughts.

"In recent years the international discovery of Korean cinema has been one of the major events for critics, scholars and lovers of fine film,” said Richard Peña, program director of the Film Society of Lincoln Center and chairman of the New York Film Festival's Selection Committee. “This screening of Crossroads of Youth, presented in manner reminiscent of early film shows in Korea, provides powerful evidence that the achievement of Korean filmmakers stretches back many decades, and even into the silent era."

Directed by Ahn Jong-hwa and featuring Shin Il-seon—star of the legendary, now-lost 1926 silent film Arirang—Crossroads of Youth tells the story of Young-bok, a man who leaves his village for Seoul in hopes of earning enough to support his family back home. However, the metropolis turns out to be a maze of bad luck and corruption.

Tickets for Crossroads of Youth are $20. For more information, please email to Yuni.ny@koreasociety.org, or call to 212-759-7525 ext.323. Purchase information is available at http://www.filmlinc.com/nyff/tickets.html#" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;.

The Korea Society and Film Society of Lincoln Center gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the Korean Film Archive in supporting this program, as well as KOIS (Korean Culture and Information Service), and Korean Cultural Service NY.

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Korea's Oldest Surviving Silent Film

#9 Post by yuni_ny » Thu Oct 01, 2009 8:24 pm

KOREA’S OLDEST SURVIVING SILENT FILM TO BE SCREENED AT THE NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

Digitally Restored Historic Film to be Accompanied by Live Music and Narration

New York, NY–September, 16–The Korea Society and the Film Society of Lincoln Center will take audiences to a bygone era when they present Korea's oldest surviving silent film, Crossroads of Youth, accompanied by musicians and live narrators (byeonsa) of the type found in Korean theaters of the 1930s. This special screening event will take place at 11:00 AM on October 3, in Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, as part of the 47th New York Film Festival.

Released in 1934 and recently digitally restored, Crossroads of Youth is a wrenching family tragedy set against the backdrop of Korea's jarring modernization. To better recreate the original film experience for modern audiences, the film will be accompanied by live musicians, playing period and contemporary music before, during and after the film. Live, dramatic narrators, called byeonsa, will also recap the plot and give voice to the characters' inner thoughts.

"In recent years the international discovery of Korean cinema has been one of the major events for critics, scholars and lovers of fine film,” said Richard Peña, program director of the Film Society of Lincoln Center and chairman of the New York Film Festival's Selection Committee. “This screening of Crossroads of Youth, presented in manner reminiscent of early film shows in Korea, provides powerful evidence that the achievement of Korean filmmakers stretches back many decades, and even into the silent era."

Directed by Ahn Jong-hwa and featuring Shin Il-seon—star of the legendary, now-lost 1926 silent film Arirang—Crossroads of Youth tells the story of Young-bok, a man who leaves his village for Seoul in hopes of earning enough to support his family back home. However, the metropolis turns out to be a maze of bad luck and corruption.
Tickets for Crossroads of Youth are $20. For more information, please email to Yuni.ny@koreasociety.org, or call to 212-759-7525 ext.323. Purchase information is available at http://www.filmlinc.com/nyff/tickets.html#" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;.

The Korea Society and Film Society of Lincoln Center gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the Korean Film Archive in supporting this program, as well as KOIS (Korean Culture and Information Service), and Korean Cultural Service NY.

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Join us for Korean Ghost Stories screening! Dec. 17

#10 Post by yuni_ny » Thu Dec 03, 2009 1:51 pm

Korean Ghost Stories
Classic Korean TV Series Comes to the U.S.

Thursday, December 17, 2009
6:30 PM * Screening

The Korea Society
950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor
(Building entrance on SW corner of Third Avenue and 57th Street)

Since 1977, KBS’ television series Korean Ghost Stories (a.k.a. Hometown of Legend) has thrilled Korean audiences with spooky tales of the supernatural. Join the members of The Korea Society as we screen two hour-long episodes of this perennial Korean favorite on Thursday, December 17. 

Often drawn from ancient folklore, these tales of tortured ghosts and supernatural curses have a uniquely Korean flavor, as women, forced by Confucian culture into subservient roles, return from the dead to take revenge on the men who caused them misery. The tales also touch on Korean attitudes towards justice, suggesting that the duty of the powerful to protect the powerless transcends even the grave.

Screening of Haunted House and The Reincarnated Princess
Thursday, December 17, 2009 – 6:30 PM

The second installment of Korean Ghost Stories features two spine-tingling episodes. In Haunted House (starring Lee Duck-hwa, Lee Min-woo, and Yoo Hye-jung), the ghost of a young woman haunts the family members who sold her into a life of corruption, and two sisters return from the grave to seduce and punish the men who killed them in The Reincarnated Princess (starring Lee Jin, Kang Sung-min, and Lee Ji-hyun).

All screenings will be presented in Korean with English subtitles.

$10 for nonmembers ($5 for members and students)

For more information contact Yuni Cho at (212) 759-7525, ext. 323 or yuni.ny@koreasociety.org.
 

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Six Decades of Film Since the Korean War

#11 Post by yuni_ny » Mon Jan 11, 2010 3:46 pm

Classic Movie Night at The Korea Society:

Facing the War
Six Decades of Film Since the Korean War

The 2010 season of The Korea Society's Classic Movie Night series will begin on Wednesday, January 20. To commemorate the sixtieth anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, The Korea Society has selected a schedule of classics that examine the conflict, and the deep, sometimes unexpected scars it has left on the Korean people.

Beginning with Man With Three Coffins on January 20, and continuing with Last Witness (February 17) and Crossing (March 17), this season's classic films will examine how, even 60 years on, the effects of the War continue to haunt communities, divide families and fracture Koreans' sense of identity. Each film will be followed by a guest speaker who will discuss its artistic and cultural context.

Place:
The Korea Society
950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor
(Building entrance on SW corner of Third Avenue and 57th Street)

Tickets to each screening are available for $5 (members) or $10 (nonmembers). For more information contact Yuni Cho at (212) 759-7525, ext. 323 or yuni.ny@koreasociety.org.

Wednesday, January 20 at 6:30 PM
Man With Three Coffins
Directed by Lee Jang-ho
Starring Kim Myung-gon and Lee Bo-hee
1987, 128 minutes

As a man travels to his deceased wife's hometown near the demilitarized zone to scatter her ashes, he finds himself enmeshed in the lives of several strangers, each of whom is on their own journey to overcome the borders, physical and psychological, that have been erected by the War. Based on the award-winning short story by Lee Je-ha titled “Travelers Do Not Rest on the Road,” The Man With Three Coffins is a deeply personal and imaginative exploration of the War’s divisions that earned plaudits from the Berlin and Tokyo International Film Festivals in 1988.

Guest Speaker: Henry H. Em, associate professor of East Asian studies, New York University

Thursday, February 18 at 6:30 PM
The Last Witness
Directed by Lee Doo-yong
Starring Choi Bool-am, Han Hye-sook, Hah Myung-joong and Jeong yun-hui
1980, 158 minutes

Detective Oh Byeong-ho investigates a murder at a local brewery and uncovers the secret history of violence and tragedy between the communist guerrillas and right-wing militias that fought in the area during the Korean War. The film’s exploration of communism made it controversial in South Korea during the 1980s. Government censors cut 40 minutes from the theatrical release.

Video Interview: Lee Sang-joon, adjunct professor of Cinema Studies, New York University and Cho Jun-hyoung, researcher, Korean Film Archive

Wednesday, March 17 at 6:00 PM
Crossing
Directed by Kim Tae-gyun
Starring Cha In-pyo and Shin Myoung-cheol
2008, 112 minutes

Crossing eloquently expresses the emotional trauma of political division. Yong-soo escapes the grinding poverty of North Korea to China, hoping to find medicine for his pregnant wife, but ends up in South Korea, separated from his family forever. Years later,Yong-soo's orphaned son in North Korea makes the same escape, hoping to find the father he never knew.

Guest Speaker: Deborah Choi, refugee from North Korea

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<The Last Witness> screening on Feb. 18 Thursday

#12 Post by yuni_ny » Thu Feb 04, 2010 3:49 pm

Classic Movie Night at The Korea Society:

Facing the War
Six Decades of Film Since the Korean War


The 2010 season of The Korea Society's Classic Movie Night series commemorates the sixtieth anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, with a carefully selected schedule of classics that examine the conflict as well as the deep and sometimes unexpected scars it has left on the Korean people.

This season's classic films examine how, even 60 years later, the effects of the War continue to haunt communities, divide families, and fracture Koreans' sense of identity. The screening will be followed by a guest speaker who will discuss its artistic and cultural context. Refreshments will be served.

Place:
The Korea Society
950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor
(Building entrance on SW corner of Third Avenue and 57th Street)

Thursday, February 18 at 6:30 PM
The Last Witness
Directed by Lee Doo-yong
Starring Choi Bool-am, Han Hye-sook, Hah Myung-joong and Jeong yun-hui
1980, 158 minutes

Detective Oh Byeong-ho investigates a murder at a local brewery and uncovers the secret history of violence, and tragedy, between the communist guerrillas and right-wing militias that fought in the area during the Korean War. The film’s exploration of communism made it controversial in South Korea during the 1980s. Government censors cut 40 minutes from the theatrical release.

Video Interview: Lee Sang-joon, adjunct professor of cinema studies, New York University and Cho Jun-hyoung, researcher, Korean Film Archive

For more information, please contact Yuni Cho at (212) 759-7525, ext. 323 or yuni.ny@koreasociety.org.

yuni_ny
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Film Screening at the Korea Society with Special Guest

#13 Post by yuni_ny » Thu Apr 01, 2010 2:56 pm

Film Screening at The Korea Society

Facing the War: Six Decades of Film Since the Korean War

Place: The Korea Society
(950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor)

Tickets to each screening are available for $10 (members) or $15 (nonmembers). For more information contact Yuni Cho at (212) 759-7525, ext. 323 or yuni.ny@koreasociety.org.

"Try to Remember," An Evening of The Kim Sisters

Thursday, April 15th
The Fabulous Kim Sisters
Video Montage, 39 minutes
6:30 PM Screening
7:15 PM Q&A with Sue Kim Bonifazio
The year is 1960, and The Kim Sisters have set the Vegas Strip afire with rich harmonies and an ability to play dozens of instruments. The sisters had been in the United States only two short years at the legendary Thunderbird—after singing for American GI's during and after the Korean War. From there, they became a staple of Rat Pack-era Las Vegas, booking clubs across the United States and appearing a record 22 times on the Ed Sullivan Show. Join us as we trace the meteoric rise of The Kim Sisters—from singing for chocolate bars in war-torn Korea to making $13,000 a week as headline entertainers—with a special montage from The Fabulous Kim Sisters and sister Sue Kim Bonifazio sharing her Stardust memories.
Moderated by Benjamin Min Han, New York University

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Luncheon Roundtable with Tribeca Film Festival Korean Direct

#14 Post by yuni_ny » Thu Apr 22, 2010 10:34 am

Korean Film in Focus:

Luncheon Roundtable with Tribeca Film Festival 2010 Korean Directors

Critics in Korea have praised directors Park Chan-ok (Paju), Lee Yong-ju (Possessed), and Ounie Lecomte (Brand New Life) for films that venture into that rarely explored space between mainstream appeal and art-house rave. Now these up-and-coming directors are finding new, global audiences through screenings on the international circuit and at the 2010 Tribeca Film Festival. In celebration of this prestigious showcase of Korean film, we invite our members and film fans to meet the directors at a special roundtable discussion.

Tuesday, April 27, 2010
11:45AM Check-in (Registration required in advance at http://www.koreasociety.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;)
12 Noon Luncheon Roundtable and Q&A

The Korea Society (950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor)

Tickets are $20 ($25 nonmembers) at http://www.koreasociety.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Contact: Yuni Cho at (212) 759-7525, ext. 323 or by Yuni.ny@koreasociety.org

About the Speakers

Park Chan-ok won International Film Festival Rotterdam's 2003 Tiger Award and the Pusan Film Festival's New Current Award for her critically acclaimed debut Jealousy is My Middle Name. In 2010 her highly anticipated second feature, Paju, became the first-ever South Korean work selected as the opening film for International Film Festival Rotterdam. Park's work offers subtle but tense portraits of anti-heroes confronting society.

Lee Yong-ju made his directorial debut with the 2009 horror film Possessed, which employed familiar genre imagery in chilling new ways in order to explore fanatical religion and superstition. Lee honed his craft as an assistant director on Bong Joon-ho's Memories of Murder.

Ounie Lecomte debuted as a director with the 2009 film A Brand New Life, based on her experiences in a Korean orphanage in the mid-1970s. A Brand New Life received awards at the 2010 Tokyo, Palm Springs and Berlin International Film Festivals.

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The Korea Society presents a special screening of Chosin

#15 Post by yuni_ny » Fri May 21, 2010 11:10 am

The Korea Society presents special screening at Symphony Space: ‘Chosin’
The Korea Society presents the New York premiere of a gripping documentary on one of the U.S. Marine Corps defining battles, with moving testimonials by Marine and Army veterans who survived, honoring those lost and relishing their part in helping build a modern Korea.

Chosin
2010, 85 mins
Director: Brain Iglesias
New York Premiere
http://www.frozenchosin.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Leonard Nimoy Thalia at Peter Norton Symphony Space:
2537 Broadway, New York, NY 10025
http://www.symphonyspace.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Tickets must be purchased at Symphony Space and are $15 for non-members, $10 for members, $7 for students and senior citizens.

Wednesday, June 9th 2010
6:30 PM Screening
8:00 PM Q&A with Director

In commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Korean War, The Korea Society presents a special screening of Chosin, a documentary film that preserves the personal stories of veterans who survived the Battle of Chosin Reservoir. In the harsh winter of 1950, numerically inferior American forces found themselves surrounded by the Chinese People's Volunteer Army. In addition to the enemy, the Americans battled the rugged Korean terrain and arctic conditions to break out of the encirclement and escort approximately 91,000 refugees to safety. For their actions, American servicemen received 14 Medals of Honor and 70 Navy Crosses (more than were awarded for the Battle of Iwo Jima). Chosin will be the first documentary film to tell their remarkable story. It won Best Documentary Feature award at the GI Film Festival 2010.

For more information contact Yuni Cho at (212) 759-7525, ext. 323 or yuni.ny@koreasociety.org or go to http://www.koreasociety.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;.

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Film Screening: Haunted By Borders; 'The Coast Guard'

#16 Post by yuni_ny » Fri Jul 02, 2010 12:43 pm

Film Screening at The Korea Society



Facing the War: Six Decades of Film Since the Korean War


To commemorate the sixtieth anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, The Korea Society has selected a schedule of classics that examine the conflict, and the deep, sometimes unexpected scars it has left on the Korean people.

Place: The Korea Society

Samsung Center of Cultural Exchange
(950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor)

Tickets to each screening are available for $5(members) or $10(nonmembers). For more information contact Yuni Cho at (212) 759-7525, ext. 323 or yuni.ny@koreasociety.org.



Film Screening: Haunted By Borders; 'The Coast Guard'
with commentary by Kim Ji-yeon, University of Minnesota



Thursday, July 8th 6PM

The Coast Guard

2002, 94 min

Director: Kim Ki-duk, Starring: Jang Dong-gun, Park Ji-a, and Yoo Hae-jin



After being commended for shooting a civilian along the DMZ, a soldier becomes unhinged and turns on his comrades. Winner of the FIPRECI prize.

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New York Korean Film Festival 2010 September 22–October 3

#17 Post by yuni_ny » Thu Sep 02, 2010 3:35 pm

New York Korean Film Festival 2010
September 22–October 3

The Korea Society presents The New York Korean Film Festival 2010, featuring the best of contemporary Korean cinema. The 2010 Festival features eight films in a collaborative effort with the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) Rose Cinema.

The New York Korean Film Festival kicks off with an opening reception at The Korea Society (950 Third Avenue@57th Street) from 5-7PM on Thursday, September 23, featuring noted Korean directors Im Sang Soo (The Housemaid) and Boo Ji-young (Sisters on the Road). Films screen from September 22-30 at MoMA and from October 1-3 at BAM Rose Cinema.

This year’s festival offers films from a range of genres: romance to action, melodrama to cutting-edge thriller, and politically charmed. The opening film is Im Sang-soo’s internationally acclaimed The Housemaid in its New York City-premiere; the director, who won positive reviews at Cannes, will be present for questions after the screening. Ms. Boo Ji-young, director of Sisters on the Road, will share in Q&A after her screening and visit a local high school film program under the auspices of The Korea Society. Avante-garde film director Roh Gyeong-tae will discuss his Land of Scarecrows at The Korea Society the evening of September 28. For more information, http://www.koreanfilmfestival.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; or contact Yuni Cho by yuni.ny@koreasociety.org

New York Korean Film Festival 2010
September 22-30, Yeonghwa: Korean Film Today@MoMA, Titus 1 Theater
October 1–October 3@BAM Rose Cinema

The Housemaid. (하녀)
2010. 106 min
Director: Im Sang-soo
Casting: Jeon Do-yeon, Lee Jung-jae, Seo Woo, Yun Yeo-jung. Good Morning Mr. President. (굿모닝프레지던트)
2009. 132 min
Director: Jang Jin
Casting: Lee Soon-jae, Jang Dong-gun, Koh Doo-sim, Im Ha-ryong.

A Frozen Flower. (쌍화점)
2008. 133 min
Director: Yoo Ha.
Casting: Zo In-sung, Joo Jin-mo, Song Ji-hyo.

Sisters on the Road. (지금, 이대로가 좋아요)
2008. 91 min
Director: Boo Ji-young.
Casting: Kong Hyo-jin, Shin Min-a.

Woochi. (전우치)
2009. 135 min
Director: Choi Dong-hoon.
Casting: Gang Dong-won, Kim Yoon-suk, Lim Soo-jung, Yoo Hae-jin.

Land of Scarecrows. (허수아비들의 땅)
2008. 90 min
Director: Roh Gyeong-tae.
Casting: Kim Sun-young, Phuong Thi Bich, Jun Du-won.

Best Seller. (베스트셀러)
2010. 117 min
Director: Lee Jeong-ho.
Casting: Um Jeong-hwa.

Eighteen. (회오리 바람)
2010. 95 min
Director: Jang Kun-Jae.
Casting: Seo Jun-yeong, Lee Min-ji.



All films are presented in Korean with English subtitles.

###

The Korea Society, 950 Third Ave@57th Street, New York, 212-759-7525, http://www.koreasociety.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; http://www.koreanfilmfestival.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

MoMA, 11 West 53th Street, New York, 212-708-9400, http://www.moma.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

BAM Rose Cinema, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn, 718-636-4100, http://www.bam.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Discussion with Director Roh Gyeong-Tae

#18 Post by yuni_ny » Mon Sep 27, 2010 1:52 pm

Discussion with Director Roh Gyeong-Tae

A major emerging talent, and winner of the New Currents award at this year's Pusan International Film Festival, Director Roh Gyeong-Tae will discuss his film Land of Scarecrows

Tuesday, September 28th
6:30PM discussion

The Korea Society
950 Third Avenue@57th Street, 8th Floor

Free and open to the public. For more information contact Yuni Cho at (212) 759-7525, ext. 323 or yuni.ny@koreasociety.org.

About the Director

Roh Gyeong-Tae, a former stockbroker, began his career in filmmaking with a series of experimental short films. His first feature film, The Last Dining Table, a portrait of discarded people living on the outskirts of Seoul, and frequently described as poetry on film, brought Roh international attention. With Land of Scarecrows, a challenging, cryptic and beautiful tableau of people on the fringe of society, Roh has emerged as a major talent.
Moderated by director and Professor Soopum Sohn
Soopum Sohn is a filmmaker and professor of film at Long Island University. His feature length film Make Yourself at Home, stars one of Korea's leading actresses Song Hye-Gyo.

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Re: Korean Film Screenings at The Korea Society

#19 Post by yuni_ny » Tue Oct 26, 2010 10:28 am

Come out to "Classic Movie Night at The Korea Society"

Place: The Korea Society: Samsung Cultural Exchange
(950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor)

Wednesday, Oct 27th at 6:30PM
The Housemaid
1960, 111 mins
Director: Kim Ki-young
Starring: Kim Jin-kyu, Joo Jeung-nyu, Hum Aeng-ran, and Lee Eun-shim

In recognition of our recent sold-out premiere of The Housemaid (2010) at MoMA, The Korea Society proudly presents this special screening of the lovingly restored 1960 original, directed by visionary, some suggest eccentric, director Kim Ki-young, who depicted his obsession with pre-modernity and modernity with respect to class differences in Korea society.
It could be interesting to compare Kim's The Housemaid to Im Sang Soo's 2010 remake of The Housemaid.
The original version of The Housemaid (1960) was restored by the World Cinema Foundation, led by Marine Scorsese along with the Korean Film Archive, and it was shown at the Cannes Film Festival in 2008.

For more information contact Yuni Cho at (212) 759-7525, ext. 323 or yuni.ny@koreasociety.org.

yuni_ny
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue Feb 19, 2008 12:41 pm

The Housemaid - opens Friday, January 21st in NYC

#20 Post by yuni_ny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 12:42 pm

The Housemaid

‘The Housemaid’, an official selection at both Cannes and Toronto which was one of the most sensational films at New York Film Festival 2010, are running at IFC Center and Lincoln Plaza Cinemas currently. THE HOUSEMAID is a stylish, sexy thriller about an innocent young woman caught in the twisted web of a rich family’s games.

Eun-yi (Cannes Best Actress winner Jeon Do-youn of SECRET SUNSHINE) is hired as a nanny in an lavish mansion by businessman Hoon (Lee Jung-jae) and his very pregnant wife, Hae-ra (Seo Woo). When Eun-yi is seduced by the father of the house, she becomes the unwitting victim in a series of traps laid by the women of the house—Hae-ra, her villainous mother (Park Ji-young), and their seemingly loyal but increasingly bitter housekeeper (Yun Yeo-jong). Intensely erotic and fiendishly entertaining, THE HOUSEMAID builds to an unforgettable climax as Eun-yi must outwit them and escape their schemes to protect her sanity—and her life—from the vicious family.

yuni_ny
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue Feb 19, 2008 12:41 pm

Contemplative Traditions Music Series: P’ungnyu in P’ansori

#21 Post by yuni_ny » Wed Mar 16, 2011 11:10 am

Contemplative Traditions Music Series: P’ungnyu in P’ansori
On March 25, the Korea Society of New York is proud to host p’ansori master Bae Il-dong. He presents a program of p’ungnyu, enthralling listeners with his stunning control of drama, narrative, melody, and rhythm. Bae performs Korea's beloved tale of Chunhyang ga, one of the five most popular epic narratives that form the p’ansori canon. The Chunhyang ga tells the story of love between Chunhyang, the daughter of a kiseng, and Yi Mongryong, the son of a magistrate. After the two are illegally married, Mongryong goes to Hanyang (Seoul) to pass the state examination to become a court official. Mr. Bae Il-dong will sing of Yi Mongryong’s return to Namwon as well as his re-encounter with his mother-in-law, Wolmae.

Noted professor Kim Dong-won, who has been part of Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble, speaks on p’ungnyu and Bae Il-dong’s performance during and at the conclusion of the event. Traditional teas and sweets are offered throughout this special hour of contemplative music, commentary and Q&A.

Friday, March 25
6:30PM
The Korea Society
950 3rd Avenue (57th and 3rd Ave.)
New York, NY 10022-2782
(212) 759-7525

yuni_ny
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Joined: Tue Feb 19, 2008 12:41 pm

Asia Week 2011 Closing Film and Performance

#22 Post by yuni_ny » Thu Mar 24, 2011 11:03 am

Asia Week 2011 Closing Film and Performance
Intangible Asset No. 82@The Museum of the Moving Image
35th Avenue and 37th Street, Astoria, N/Q Train to 36th Avenue

The Korea Society closes out Asia Week 2011 at the Museum of the Moving Image with a screening of the documentary Intangible Asset No. 82. In the film, director Emma Franz follows Simon Barker, an Austrailian jazz musician, on his exploration of Korean traditional folk rhythm and shamanic ritual. He meets Intangible Asset No. 82, shaman Kim Seok-Chul, and professor Kim Dong-Won, who guide advise him on the technique and roots of traditional Korean music.

Following the screening, Kim, Parker and artist Bae Il-dong will perform contemporary and jazz stylings on traditional instruments. This screening is part of Korean Cinema Now, co-presented by the Museum of the Moving Image and The Korea Society. The Museum of the Moving Image recently reopened after a $67 million expansion, with dyamic new architecture by Thomas Leeser and New York City’s newest, state-of-the art screen.
Screening of Intangible Asset No. 82
With a Live Performance
Sunday, March 27
2PM

Tickets, $10 at The Museum of the Moving Image

yuni_ny
Posts: 29
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Contemplative Traditional Music Series: Springtime Court Mus

#23 Post by yuni_ny » Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:54 am

Contemplative Traditional Music Series: Springtime Court Music

On April 21, Artist Heejung Han performs the two-stringed haegŭm in the p’ungnyu style, and her subdued and unhurried melodies are designed to prompt contemplation. Han opens with the Yuch’osin chi kok version of the Yŏngsanhoesang, accompanied by two wind instruments, the delicate tune reminiscent of Kyŏnggi folk music with Chinyang, Chungmori, Chungjungmori, and Chajinmori rhythms. Han concludes with Chŏk Nyŏm, a seven-movement solo piece for haegŭm composed by master Kim Yŏngjae, and a composition by Yang Sŏnghwan that derives from the folk music of Kyŏngsang province.

Traditional teas and sweets are on offer throughout this special hour of contemplative music, commentary and Q&A.

Thursday, April 21
6:30PM
with Han Hee-jung

About the Performer:
Han Hee-jung was a principal member of two traditional orchestras in Korea, the Youth Korean Traditional Music Orchestra and Seoul Korean Traditional Music Orchestra, prior to immigrating to the United States. She graduated from Chu-Gye University for the Arts, where she received traditional academic training and studied under celebrated haegŭm performers Kim Jung-lim and Yang Kyung-sook. She joined the Korean Traditional Performing Arts Association’s Chamber Ensemble in 2005, developing new approaches to Korean traditional compositions.

Yuni Yoonjung Cho
Director, Film, The Korea Society
950 Third Ave. 8Fl
New York, NY 10022
Tel) 212-759-7525 ext.323
http://www.koreasociety.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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The Korea Society's Yeonghwa: Korean Film Today @ MoMA

#24 Post by yuni_ny » Fri Sep 09, 2011 1:36 pm

The Korea Society's Yeonghwa: Korean Film Today @ MoMA

The long wait is finally over, and on behalf of The Korea Society, I am happy to invite you to the second annual Yeonghwa: Korean Film Today @ MoMA screenings starting this September 22nd and lasting through October 2nd. We are excited to announce a terrific lineup which is currently available on our website and MoMA's Film calendar.

This year, we are pleased to welcome back Yim Soon-rye, South Korea’s most highly regarded female filmmaker, to New York for the Opening Night’s screening of Rolling Home with a Bull (2010), which follows a young man’s forlorn life as a failed poet and unemployed bachelor, who winds up taking an unexpected journey throughout the country with his father’s cherished bull and making a series of peculiar run-ins.

This year’s Yeonghwa series will also have a special focus on director Jeon Kyu-hwan, whose Town Trilogy films--Mozart Town (2008), Animal Town (2009) and Dance Town (2010)—examines various human lives that exist in Seoul’s urban landscape, including those of an African laborer, a Russian exchange student, a reformed pedophile, a North Korean defector, and a dejected print-shop owner. Jeon’s Town Trilogy critiques the “town” of Seoul from a sociological auteur’s perspective.

And this year, for the first time ever, The Korea Society's film lineup includes two short films by master filmmakers Bong Joon-ho and Hong Sang-soo that were featured at the 2011 Jeonju International Film Festival as a part of their Digital Film Project. These short films will be making their premiere in New York through the Yeonghwa series.

We are also pleased to present the New York premiere of Kim Ki-duk’s highly anticipated film Arirang (2011), which has created a lot of buzz since its world premiere at the 64th Cannes Film Festival.

Finally, the Yeonghwa series will close with a retrospective of South Korea’s legendary filmmaker Lee Man-hee, whose works have recently experienced a surge of renewed interest since the 2010 remake of Late Autumn—a lost film that was originally conceived by Lee in 1966. His two films Black Hair (1964) and Day Off (1968) will both be screened at MoMA.

The film program admittance is included with MoMA admission:
$20 for adults; $16 for seniors, 65 years and over with I.D.; $12 for full-time students with current I.D.; free for children 16 and under.

The Korea Society Members can purchase tickets at a special membership rate of $5.
You must have The Korea Society membership card when purchasing tickets at this rate.
Please contact Yuni Cho at yuni.ny@koreasociety.org for ticket sales inquiries.

The Korea Society
950 Third Ave, 8th Fl.
New York, New York 10022
tel: (212) 759-7525 ext. 351 (Thursday & Friday 10am-5pm)
fax: (212) 759-7530

yuni_ny
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Korean Film In Focus: Director’s Talk with Jeon Kyu-hwan

#25 Post by yuni_ny » Fri Sep 16, 2011 11:29 am

The Korea Society presents
Korean Film In Focus: Director’s Talk with Jeon Kyu-hwan

Monday, October 3
6:00PM Video Clips from ‘Town Trilogy’ & Discussion

Director Jeon Kyu-hwan has garnered international attention since the 2008 debut of Mozart Town, the first in his Town Trilogy. His second film, Animal Town, was lauded by critics and festival attendees. The third installment, Dance Town, earned awards at Berlin and the Pusan International Film Festival. Variety Magazine’s Russell Edwards hailed Dance Town as a “confrontational slice of urban life that plays like a blend of John Cassavetes and Ken Loach with a sharp kimchi taste.” Jeon’s next feature film is Varanasi, currently in pre-production. He addresses The Korea Society on the trilogy, shown as part of the MoMA series, as well as his upcoming feature.

Moderated by Dr. Choi Jung-bong
Assistant professor of Cinema Studies, New York University
                                
The Korea Society
950 Third Avenue@57th Street, 8th Floor

Admission fee will be $10 for members($20 for guests, students & senior will be discounted). More information at http://www.koreasociety.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; or contact yuni.ny@koreasociety.org.

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