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PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2007 4:54 pm 
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Roger_Thornhill wrote:
I've heard quite a few people say they dislike Part III because Michael is a bastard and as such he should've continued being a nasty fellow until it destroys him. That to me sounds like the conventional approach.

When Al Pacino was on Inside The Actor's Studio, he said he wondered if this was reason enough why the film was not as well-received. If that were the sole reason alone that the film was a financial failure upon it's release, it now would be as revered as the other films in the franchise.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2007 7:43 am 
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Roger_Thornhill wrote:
How can any film critic be objective when our likes and dislikes are based on a plethora of things such as personal experiences, mood, our environment, level of knowledge, age, etc...?

That is exactly why I said I was naive..


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2007 10:49 am 
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Just to touch upon the thematic elements of the film again - what really struck me about The Godfather Part III is the exploration of family, tradition and honor that were so integral in the first two movies are pretty much abandoned here.

There is a scene in which Anthony asks Michael "How can a country this beautiful, have so much violence?". To me, this seems to sum up Coppola's themes for this film - as a forum to address violence, ambition and how they are intertwined - but like the dialogue above, I believe he handles them in an overly simplistic fashion. We get none of the complexity and moral anxiety that made the first two films so fascinating. Instead, we get Michael and Vincenzo sort of acting like rogues and the
Vatican like Enron.

I recall reading somewhere that there were lots of rewrites on the script for this film, and I think it's felt heavily throughout. But it speaks to the power of Pacino as an actor that he makes it easy to sit through the three hour film. He is always a spellbinding presence throughout the film.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2007 1:47 pm 

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flyonthewall2983 wrote:
Roger_Thornhill wrote:
I've heard quite a few people say they dislike Part III because Michael is a bastard and as such he should've continued being a nasty fellow until it destroys him. That to me sounds like the conventional approach.

When Al Pacino was on Inside The Actor's Studio, he said he wondered if this was reason enough why the film was not as well-received. If that were the sole reason alone that the film was a financial failure upon it's release, it now would be as revered as the other films in the franchise.

Oh I'm not trying to suggest it's as good as I or II, just that it's a common complaint I've heard about part III and one I disagree with.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:59 pm 

Joined: Wed Jul 24, 2013 12:59 am
Recently re-watched Godfather III on BD. I feel this film has been unfairly maligned over the years; sure, it's not even close to being as good as the first two GF films, but it's still a decent (if flawed) movie.

I've always been interested in the theme of redemption, so it was interesting here to see an aging Michael Corleone looking back at his life, regretting many of the things he had done, and trying to make up for them.

Spoilers below, to those who haven't aleady seen this film:

The Atlantic city massacre was quite shocking & unexpected when I first saw this, since I didn't see it coming in the least. Quite brutal & raw.

IMHO the final sequence in the film (the opera & Mary's subsequent death scene) was expertly carried out; it was quite suspenseful seeing the assasin skulk in the opera's balconies & take out the bodyguards; and, it was a shock when Mary (Sofia C.) died; this was especially horrible, since Michael was the target & he would obviously live with this guilt for the rest of his life.

And, I felt the very final scene with an elderly Michael dying peacefully in the small Italian village to be quite poignant & ironic; he had lived a very violent life & was responsible for a lot of deaths....Yet, he himself lived a long life & passed of natural causes...

This film also has one of my favorite quotes in cinema, "Just when I thought I was out... they pull me back in."


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 1:38 am 
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Quote:
flyonthewall2983 wrote:
Roger_Thornhill wrote:
I've heard quite a few people say they dislike Part III because Michael is a bastard and as such he should've continued being a nasty fellow until it destroys him. That to me sounds like the conventional approach.

When Al Pacino was on Inside The Actor's Studio, he said he wondered if this was reason enough why the film was not as well-received. If that were the sole reason alone that the film was a financial failure upon it's release, it now would be as revered as the other films in the franchise.

Sofia Coppola really took it on the chin for her performance in this. unfairly, i might add...i always thought that was a big part of the negative reaction to it. i rewatched this the other day and i was surprised how much i mis-remebered so many things. it's definitely not great by any stretch and they should've moved heaven and earth to get robert duvall to reprise his role but it really is a solid movie...


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 9:21 am 
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I actually think Coppola and Puzo came up with an intriguing storyline for this film exploring how religion is corrupted by organized crime as a complement to the political corruption shown in PART II. Unfortunately, the entire affair has the feeling of a made-for-TV reunion movie. The sloppiness in execution is especially annoying: that dreadful freeze-frame matte job during the scene where Michael talks to Don Tommasino's body in the casket practically derails a good moment for Pacino (his hand becoming transparent is quite irksome) and I have no idea why Coppola or the editors thought it acceptable to show the same two mob guys get gunned down twice during the Atlantic City massacre; the sequence is already a little long and telegraphs much of the action ("Wait, I need my lucky coat!" #-o).


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2016 12:35 pm 
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I'm pondering a connection between this film and the Coppola project that followed, Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992).

Consider the scene where Vincent and Michael discuss the former's "godfatherhood": Michael looks much like a tired vampire who considers his legacy a curse passed on to someone beloved and ignorant of the pain born of violence.

I imagine this as being symptomatic of the ideas Coppola was interested in during the early 90s and a reason why he retold the Dracula story the way he did.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 4:08 am 
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"You were my horror" was a nice callback to Apocalypse Now


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2016 11:32 am 

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The only aspect of III which I liked was the character of Connie, Michael's sister. In I and II, she was against all of the violence and murder that her brother committed. In III, she became a conspirator, a kind of witch who helped Michael to commit more murders.


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