Eastmancolor

Discuss films and filmmakers of the 20th century (and even a little of the 19th century). Threads may contain spoilers.
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pzman84
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#1 Post by pzman84 » Fri May 05, 2006 3:02 am

When talking about color, everyone talks about 3-Strip Technicolor. What I want to know is the color process that came after that-Eastmancolor. I have found very little information on this.

What I have found is in 1952, Kodak and Ansco came up with workable film stock of color. This film stock could be used in regular Black and White cameras. This led to a varity of labs that produced color films (Anscocolor, Metrocolor, Warnercolor, Pathecolor, DeLuxe, etc.). Also, Technicolor continued to use their dye-imibition process but to get the matricies out of the Eastman strips.

What I want to know is the specifics. For example, what made some labs (like Metrocolor and Ansco) better than other labs (like Warnercolor and DeLuxe)? What it just the quality of the labs or was there a chemical process they did? Also, what was the difference between a credit that said "Filmed in Anscocolor (or Deluxe, Metrocolor, etc.), Prints by Technicolor" versus just "Color by Technicolor"? Is there any book I can find about 1950s and 60s film color processes? Any help would be much appreciated.

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david hare
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#2 Post by david hare » Fri May 05, 2006 4:26 am

Wow!! This is a huge topic. And so glad you started it.

I wont begin to get into the bulkk of it. there are thousands of books and websites that will cover Eastman much MUCH better than I could ever suggest.

But I really want to reply to the last part of your post.

Not only did Techni 3-strip negative and matrix stock basically fold around 1953 with the advent of panchromatic Eastman neg stock. The Technicolor labs themselves took up and very much succeeded at massive, cost cutting but ultra high-quality postive printing in their own dye transfer/Imibitiion/IB process - THIS, the postivie print side of Technicolor is the real story. All the other printing processes were photochemical, whereas the Techni IB process remained high quality, artisanal "photo-mechanical", if you like, where the dyes were transferred (imbibed) directly into the postive stock from a matrix. Their prints were (and are still are) virtually fade proof, and the process has never been bettered. This, even during the fifties with the proliferation of Studio patended versions of Eastman - Warner, deLuxe etc for whom the quality control ranged from applling to barely reliable. Eastman positive stock continued to fade, and actually got even WORSE during the late 70s when IRC internegs were on the market.

The big studios recognized the superiority of Techni in not only reproducing color density and ultra pure blacks and tonal gradations and also the longevity of the release prints both 16 and 35mm. Hence Written on the Wind and many others, "photographed in de Luxe", "prints by Technicolor."

We will never see its like again.

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HerrSchreck
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#3 Post by HerrSchreck » Fri May 05, 2006 4:43 am

pzman84 wrote:When talking about color, everyone talks about 3-Strip Technicolor. What I want to know is the color process that came after that-Eastmancolor. I have found very little information on this.

What I have found is in 1952, Kodak and Ansco came up with workable film stock of color. This film stock could be used in regular Black and White cameras. This led to a varity of labs that produced color films (Anscocolor, Metrocolor, Warnercolor, Pathecolor, DeLuxe, etc.). Also, Technicolor continued to use their dye-imibition process but to get the matricies out of the Eastman strips.

What I want to know is the specifics. For example, what made some labs (like Metrocolor and Ansco) better than other labs (like Warnercolor and DeLuxe)? What it just the quality of the labs or was there a chemical process they did? Also, what was the difference between a credit that said "Filmed in Anscocolor (or Deluxe, Metrocolor, etc.), Prints by Technicolor" versus just "Color by Technicolor"? Is there any book I can find about 1950s and 60s film color processes? Any help would be much appreciated.
You have just walked into DaveHare's private room-- that's him polishing that thing in the middle of the room: his Rosetta Stone... IB's.

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david hare
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#4 Post by david hare » Fri May 05, 2006 5:29 am

Dances by appointment!

Mysterypez
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#5 Post by Mysterypez » Sun May 07, 2006 12:53 pm

Locate this book.

A HISTORY OF MOTION PICTURE COLOR TECHNOLOGY by Roderick Ryan published by The Focal Press. The edition I have is from 1977, but there might be later editions. ISBN. 0 240 50953 6

The book breaks out every major color system used in film. It covers Tinting and toning, the various additive systems, lenticular color, the basic subtractive color processes and all of the other subcategories.... Ansco Color, Reversal stocks, Fuji, Agfa-Gevaert, Gaspar Color, and of course Eastman Color.

Red Light
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Re: Eastmancolor

#6 Post by Red Light » Wed May 13, 2015 8:19 am

Just digging up this old thread.

Can anyone list some prime example films, with optimal use of the different types of color systems?

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Tommaso
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Re: Eastmancolor

#7 Post by Tommaso » Thu May 14, 2015 6:16 am

I really love the slightly muted, pastel tones of Agfacolor, but it only looks good if it's fully restored. A prime example for this would be the 1943 "Münchhausen", but you'd need the newer restoration (released in Germany on a two disc set) to see it in full glory, not the earlier version released by Eureka in the UK.

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