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PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2012 4:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 11:49 am
Location: brooklyn
This shrine was built to Chris Marker in front of Light Industry last night:
http://instagram.com/p/OyoF5rhUbS/?fb_s ... er_message


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 5:12 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2011 5:34 pm
Location: NYC
What a wonderful evening at Light Industry! Pleasantly surprised at the fantastic turnout, not a seat to be had and no room left for standing in the back. The youth, diversity and about equal if not leaning female, male/female ratio was also rather surprising but, great to see.

Some thoughts on the films, Letter From Siberia was Marker as always translating a place of mystery and unknowns into humor related by keen insights into people not so unlike ourselves. Martha Rosler introduced the film and spoke about why Marker disowned the film but, it was hard for me to hear in the back. Swore she said something about Hungary, huh???? Can anybody shed any light on this as I'm pretty sure I misheard her. First time I had seen Last Bolshevik, maybe it's me but, I think in a 120 minutes Marker managed to encapsulate the essence of the Soviet Union in ways volumes of 1000 page books or other much longer documentaries can never dream of doing. And that ending is as perfect an ending as I've ever seen.

Image

Image


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 1:43 pm 

Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: Los Angeles CA
That's pretty nice that they got Martha Rosler to speak as well.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 8:50 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 14, 2006 10:21 pm
Just to follow up. I have ordered Description of a Struggle on DVD from the Jerusalem Cinematheque. I had to email their video department directly and do the credit card transaction via email (reluctantly). I'll report back when it arrives. Thanks again Adam for the info.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 2:43 am 

Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: Los Angeles CA
Excellent! Please let us know if it arrives safely and what the film is like.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:08 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 14, 2006 10:21 pm
I received Description of a Struggle from The Jerusalem Cinematheque a few days ago (pretty speedy delivery to Canada, I think). No problems with the credit card transaction etc., and at $25 (Canadian) a pretty nice deal.

The image quality is, as expected, not great. It looks like a decent 16mm print transferred to Beta or VHS and then to DVD (or so I figure). It is a bit washed out and there is lots of visible print damage, though none of it too serious. But it is viewable and not so terrible that anything is lost or obscured. Indeed, it is better than many of the bootleg Marker films out there on ebay or youtube (Le Joli Mai, the Koumiko Mystery, etc.). There are simultaneous English and French subtitles (one over the other), which are pretty good, though at times there are parts of the v/o that are untranslated, as are the credits. This is a bit frustrating, but infrequent. I'll have a Hebrew-speaking friend look it over to see what is missing someday.

I've only watched it once, so I won't comment too much on the film itself, except to say that it is much like Marker's other essay films of this period (Letter from Siberia, Koumiko Mystery, Cuba Si etc.). There is the sly Markerian humour, the careful use of editing alongside the commentary, and some very fascinating footage of life on the streets and in the kibbutz.

I am very happy to finally get to see this film, and would say to others who are interested that it is worth ordering.

Thanks again, Adam.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 7:42 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
I've just had a press release from the Whitechapel Gallery in London with the following info-nugget:

Quote:
Chris Marker

16 April – 22 June 2014, Galleries 1, 8 & Victor Petitgas Gallery (Gallery 9)

Visionary French filmmaker, photographer, writer and artist Chris Marker (1921 – 2012) is widely acknowledged as the finest exponent of the ‘essay film’. He is best known as the director of over 50 films including Sans soleil (Sunless, 1983), A Grin Without a Cat (1977) and for his most influential work La Jetée (The Pier, 1962), imagining a Paris devastated by nuclear catastrophe and composed almost entirely of black-and-white still photographs, which later informed the narrative of Terry Gilliam’s 12 Monkeys (1995). He was a prescient multi-media maker, exploring the future through both digital art and via his numerous online avatars. This important exhibition – his first UK retrospective – looks at Marker’s prolific career and considers his influence on contemporary British art and artists.

Organised in collaboration with Chris Darke and the Centre Pompidou. Free


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