Hong Kong Cinema

Discuss films and filmmakers of the 20th century (and even a little of the 19th century). Threads may contain spoilers.
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artfilmfan
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#176 Post by artfilmfan » Wed Feb 01, 2017 11:22 pm

If the prices are the same, will get the one with the best picture of Maggie Cheung on the cover.

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Banasa
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#177 Post by Banasa » Sun May 21, 2017 9:41 am

A new blu-ray of Benny Chan's popular triad melodrama A Moment of Romance is available for pre-order on YesAsia.

The packaging has seemed to have gone above and beyond, at least from these pictures.

Then again, the link above states "lthough publisher take Digital Scan version from Copyright holder but there might be some scratch on screen. Some scratch are not error. So please understand this situation. Thank you." Take that how you will.

hanshotfirst1138
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#178 Post by hanshotfirst1138 » Thu May 25, 2017 10:32 pm

Fingers crossed...

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colinr0380
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#179 Post by colinr0380 » Sat Dec 30, 2017 9:34 am

This is why year-end round ups are so important. I have not been following Hong Kong cinema recently so it was great to find this run down of the Hong Kong films of the year, which includes The White Girl, co-directed by Christopher Doyle; The Founding of an Army by Andrew Lau Wai-Keung (of Infernal Affairs), the third in the series about the history of the Chinese Communist Party; a pair of Journey To The West adaptations: Wu Kong up against Tsui Hark's Stephen Chow-starring special effect laden Journey To The West: The Demons Strike Back; John Woo's doing his dualistic cop-criminal thing again with Manhunt and topped by a new film by Ann Hui, Our Time Will Come.

Meow (if Jellyfish Eyes can get a Criterion release, then surely this can! Though of course Futurama got to the premise first!), The Sinking City: Capsule Odyssey, The Sleep Curse (which feels like an extremely gory throwback to the heyday of the Category III films of the late 80s and early 90s) and 29+1 also look quite intriguing out of that list!
Last edited by colinr0380 on Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Michael Kerpan
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#180 Post by Michael Kerpan » Sat Dec 30, 2017 5:47 pm

Well -- this list starts with the worst and works up to no. 1 -- which is the new Ann Hui Blu-Ray that just arrived in my mailbox yesterday. ;-)

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whaleallright
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#181 Post by whaleallright » Mon May 07, 2018 5:28 pm

Does anyone know why Chang Cheh's Tiger Boy, the film that, along with Come Drink with Me, kicked off the renovation of the wu xia in the mid 1960s, is not on home video at all? It's a Shaw Bros pic, of course, so I assume Celestial has the rights to it.

Orlac
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#182 Post by Orlac » Tue May 08, 2018 1:16 am

It apparently doesn't exist.

masterofoneinchpunch
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#183 Post by masterofoneinchpunch » Tue May 08, 2018 2:03 pm

I had asked this question a dozen times over the years on various martial art sites. There has always been rumors that HKFA had a copy (checking their online site I do not see it listed there), that Toby Russell had seen it; but no concrete evidence that the film had survived. I would certainly buy it if it came out; but I am in the opinion that it no longer is extant.

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whaleallright
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#184 Post by whaleallright » Tue May 08, 2018 5:38 pm

So the various histories that suggest that Shaws delayed the release of the film, but eventually put it out after the success of Come Drink with Me are false? Or was it given a local release and then subsequently lost?

masterofoneinchpunch
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#185 Post by masterofoneinchpunch » Tue May 08, 2018 6:27 pm

whaleallright wrote:So the various histories that suggest that Shaws delayed the release of the film, but eventually put it out after the success of Come Drink with Me are false? Or was it given a local release and then subsequently lost?
"It premiered in Singapore and Malaysia to critical acclaim, followed by a successful release in Hong Kong outshining many of the colour films released at around the same time." -- Chang Cheh A Memoir

Also The Shaw Screen: A Preliminary Study has it coming out in February of 1966 a couple of months earlier than Come Drink with Me.

Where did you get that information on it coming out later than Come Drink with Me?

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whaleallright
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema

#186 Post by whaleallright » Wed May 09, 2018 3:23 pm

I can't actually remember where I picked that up; perhaps I was misremembering!

Looking over my materials, it seems there are a number of different descriptions of how the film was released. David Bordwell in Planet Hong Kong gives it a release date of 1966, which IMDB corroborates (like The Shaw Screen, specifying February 1966, compared to Come Drink with Me's April).

Tony Williams in A Companion to Hong Kong Cinema says it was shot in 1963, briefly released in 1964, and then re-released in 1966 after Jimmy Wang Yu had starred in two successful films. Williams implies that the film exists but Celestial has "no plans" to release it on home video. (Given the film's importance and its star, I would think that if halfway decent elements had survived, they would find a way to release it.)

Stephen Teo (in Chinese Martial Arts Cinema: The Wuxia Tradition) dates Tiger Boy's production to 1965 and its release to 1966.

Some of these and other books reference the film having been a commercial failure, but I doubt they're relying on any kind of financial documents to validate that. Most of what's said about this film seems to belong in the realm of hearsay.

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