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 Post subject: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 5:40 pm 
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Spike Lee (1957-)

Image

Filmography

Last Hustle In Brooklyn (1977) (Documentary short)

The Answer (1980) (Short)

Sarah (1981) (Short)

Joe's Bed-Stuy Barbershop: We Cut Heads (1983) (Short)

She's Gotta Have It (1986) - MGM Region 2,4 and 5 (DVD Beaver; DVD Talk; DVD Verdict)

School Daze (1988) - Columbia TriStar (Original DVD release): (The Digital Bits; DVD Movie Guide; DVD Authority; Reel.com)
-Columbia Tristar (2nd release with second commentary, three featurettes and CD soundtrack): (DVD Movie Central; DVD Movie Guide comparison)

Do The Right Thing (1989) - Criterion R1 (DVD Beaver comparison with earlier Universal R1 disc; Digital Bits comparison of the same discs; DVD Journal; DVD Verdict; DVD Movie Central; DVD Movie Guide)
Released in Region 1 by Universal as part of a "Spike Lee Joint Collection" set without extras, disc reviewed at DVD Times

Mo' Better Blues (1990) - Universal R1 (DVD Authority)
Released in Region 1 by Universal as part of a "Spike Lee Joint Collection" set without theatrical trailer from original disc, is reviewed at DVD Times

Jungle Fever (1991) - Only released in Region 1 by Universal as part of a "Spike Lee Joint Collection" set, reviewed at DVD Times

Malcolm X (1992) - Warner R1 (DVD Savant; DVD Talk; DVD Movie Guide; DVD Verdict; DVD Times); Pathe R2 (UK)

Crooklyn (1994) - Only released in Region 1 by Universal as part of a "Spike Lee Joint Collection" set, reviewed at DVD Times

Clockers (1995) - Only released in Region 1 by Universal as part of a "Spike Lee Joint Collection" set, reviewed at DVD Times
Universal R2 UK and R4 disc (DVD Freak)

Lumière et compagnie (1995) (Segment) - Fox Lorber R1 (Out of print) YouTube

Girl 6 (1996) - Anchor Bay R1 (DVD Talk)

Get On The Bus (1996) - Columbia TriStar R1 (DVD Movie Central; Film Freak Central; DVD Authority)

4 Little Girls (1997) - HBO R1 (DVD Authority; Digitally Obsessed)

He Got Game (1998) - Buena Vista Home Entertainment R1 (Films On Disc)

Summer Of Sam (1999) - DownTown Pictures/MGM R2(UK) (DVD Times; DVD Reviewer; The Region 2 Project). The UK disc contains commentary, trailer and TV spots, booklet containing Lee 1999 London Film Festival Q&A, behind the scenes footage and photo gallery against R1 Touchstone disc which contains only a trailer.

The Original Kings of Comedy (2000) - Paramount R1 (DVD Verdict; The Digital Bits)

Bamboozled (2000) - New Line R1 (DVD Verdict; Digitally Obsessed; DVD Movie Guide)

A Huey P. Newton Story - Urban Works R1 (Combustible Celluloid)

Jim Brown: All American (2002) - Warner HBO R1 (DVD Talk; DVD Verdict)

Ten Minutes Older: The Trumpet (2002) (Segment: We Wuz Robbed) - Blue Dolphin R2 (includes both The Trumpet and The Cello) (DVD Times)

25th Hour (2002) - Buena Vista Home Video R1 (DVD Beaver; DVD Verdict; DVD Talk, (2))

She Hate Me (2004) - Columbia TriStar R1 (DVD Talk; DVD Movie Central)

Sucker Free City (2004) (TV Pilot)

Miracle's Boys (2005) (TV series - 2 Episodes) - Paramount R1

All The Invisible Children (Les Enfants invisibles) (Segment: Jesus Children of America) (2005) - All I could find on video release was a review of a Dutch DVD. Also here's a trailer for the film.

Inside Man (2006) - Universal R1 (DVD Verdict; DVD Authority; DVD Talk). Also released on HD-DVD format.

When The Levees Broke: A Requiem In Four Acts (2006) - HBO R1 (DVD Beaver; DVD Verdict; DVD Talk)

Shark (2006) (TV series - Pilot) - 20th Century Fox R1 (DVD) (DVD Talk)

M.O.N.Y. (2007) (TV series - Pilot)

Miracle At St. Anna (2008) - Touchstone R1 - No extras on DVD (DVD Talk), only on Blu-Ray (DVD Beaver)

Passing Strange (2009) - MPI Video R1 (DVD)

Kobe Doin' Work (2009) - Buena Vista R1 (DVD)

Da Brick (2010) (TV Movie)

Red Hook Summer (2011) - Image Entertainment R1 (Blu & DVD)

Michael Jackson: Bad 25 (2012)

Oldboy (2013)

Da Sweet Blood of Jesus (2014)

Chi-Raq (2015)


Criterion Forum resources

She’s Gotta Have It

She Hate Me and School Daze DVDs

Do The Right Thing

Inside Man

When The Levees Broke

Miracle Of St.Anna

The Clint v. Spike bust up

Passing Strange


Web resources

Films

Jonathan Rosenbaum on Mo' Better Blues

Interview with Lee covering early career, commercial work and financing of Malcolm X

DVD Talk interview with Spike Lee at the time of the release of the Malcolm X DVD

Nathan Rabin on Bamboozled

PBS website tied in to the Huey P. Newton Story film

Rosenbaum on 25th Hour

HBO website on When The Levees Broke.

Books

Review of BFI Modern Classic book on Do The Right Thing by Ed Guerrero


Last edited by colinr0380 on Sun Feb 21, 2016 7:02 pm, edited 8 times in total.

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 Post subject: Spike Lee Films
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 2008 10:53 pm 
Bringing Out El Duende
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Location: New York City
Despite the fact that Lee is not on my list of favorite directors he does occupy a vital place in my consciousness of film in general; in particular, though - and most especially - in the manner in which the African American community is portrayed. You can certainly trace the influence of directors he admires - many of his films contain sequences which are obvious homages to notable directors of the past - but there is a distinct Spike Lee visual style that, although at times conspicuous and deliberately "attention-grabbing", is difficult to ignore and certainly hard to forget.

Most conspicuous for me are the "on the street" scenes involving dialogue among ordinary folks which are not a part of the main narrative but which are absolutely necessary in terms of Spike Lee's overall gestalt. It's a device which informs Lee's overall perspective. And I don't think anyone can argue that the man has no perspective (whether it's personal as in She's Gotta Have It or communal as in When The Levees Broke or a combination as in Do The Right Thing). These seemingly off the cuff remarks from people within the community which surrounds much of the action in his narratives MUST be said, whether their remarks are seemingly innocuous or curiously poignant. I'm thinking for instance of the street conversations between Mos Def and 'the girl' in Bamboozled, or the conversation between two Black men standing on line to hear Malcolm X speak in X or the three older men sitting under the sun on a hot day in Bed Stuy in Do The Right Thing, seemingly gossiping about whatever enters their heads (or whomever walks by).

You certainly won't find anything like this in a Robert Bresson film. But you might see it in Hitchcock. Neurotics tend to be highly aware of social atmosphere and Hitch was especially sensitive to this and displayed it in all his films. Why Hitchcock here? Well, I think Hitch was at heart a social critic, though far less obvious than Lee. And I think Lee's visual storytelling is strongest when he is less of a polemicist and more a visual artist, though his politics are indispensible to his craft. On the other hand, when he completely abandons an overt political stance, like in Inside Man for example, I find his approach routine and not entirely compelling.


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 Post subject: Spike LEE
PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 1:21 am 

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 9:16 pm
I saw Spike Lee give a lecture at UTA College, as I am a big fan of most of the movies I've seen... mostly his earlier stuff- Do the Right Thing, Mo Better Blues, to name a few. I thought of how cool it would be to see him talk, and hear all the things he had to say about movies.
He didn't really talk about his movies or anything that had to do with movies. He talked about sports! It was kind of boring, he was kind of an asshole to the people asking the questions. All in all, kind of made me sad.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 7:09 pm 
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Yeah, all these year I admired Spike Lee and even defended his weaker movies because I believed he was a filmmaker with conviction. It saddens me that the truth is that he's just douche.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 9:35 pm 
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Location: California
I feel like anyone who tries to push an agenda as much as Spike Lee injures their image in the process.

An example in the same vein is Jesse Jackson or Rev. Al Sharpton.

It is sad because he has a "real" message that he is beating senselessly and causing people to view his films with a very sour taste in their mouth.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:48 pm 
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You can watch Lee's segment from Ten Minutes Older: The Trumpet, We Wuz Robbed, right here.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 4:14 pm 
Bringing Out El Duende
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Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2004 6:53 pm
Location: New York City
Interesting. I don't think I'd like to hang out with Spike Lee, either. But you certainly can't deny that he is essentially a filmmaker at heart. I recently saw an interview featuring the late filmmaker, Sergi Parajanov, where he stated that filmmakers are born and not made. He certainly isn't the first to say it but I think that people who do alot of film watching (or directing) can recognize a natural when they see one. I hope Spike can get back to the sheer love of the craft.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 8:24 pm 
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I think you're absolutely right that Spike is a filmmaking natural, and he's released one masterpiece a decade, since he started making movies, to prove it. It saddened me to see that someone in the Inglorious Bastards thread made the assertion that Tarantino is the "superior" filmmaker. I'm not even sure what that means, but I can tell you that it's fightin words where I came from, and demonstrably false by any metric outside of average box office receipt.

I've always kind of envisioned him as the type of director who will get much greater acclaim when he's no longer with us, but perhaps that will change now that we have a President and First Lady whose first date was to see a Spike Lee movie!


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 8:57 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm
carax09 wrote:
I think you're absolutely right that Spike is a filmmaking natural, and he's released one masterpiece a decade, since he started making movies, to prove it. It saddened me to see that someone in the Inglorious Bastards thread made the assertion that Tarantino is the "superior" filmmaker. I'm not even sure what that means, but I can tell you that it's fightin words where I came from, and demonstrably false by any metric outside of average box office receipt.

While I agree that Do the Right Thing is a masterpiece, I have no idea what other films you're talking about with your One Masterpiece Per Decade declaration. I think comparing Lee and Tarantino is silly, but saying your personal preference is something that can be more correct than someone else's preference doesn't do your argument any favors.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 10:39 pm 
Bringing Out El Duende
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Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2004 6:53 pm
Location: New York City
Hmmm. Think I'll leave that comparison alone. But I would like to point out how Lee gives visual nods to older, classic filmmakers. One of the most obvious examples is one I noticed at the opening of X. It's an exiting visual sequence composed of three main parts. The screen is black and we hear the voiceover of a man ending a Muslim prayer, then announcing Malcolm X to an audience. Suddenly, cymbols crash and Lee thrusts a huge American flag in our faces across the entire length and width of the screen.

This first image, though subverted by Lee with the soundtrack ("I charge the white man with being the greatest murderer on earth..."), is right out Franklin J. Schaffner's Patton.

Now, instead of watching a strapping, seasoned American general in chaps stride across the stage, the flag image is suddenly interrupted by the well known real life images of Rodney King being beaten by cops in an L.A. street. Suddenly we return to a slowly burning flag. More beating. More burning. Washington's narration gets more and more intense. More beating. And more burning until the formation of a letter X is outlined with the final voiceover by Denzel Washington exclaiming: "We don't see any American Dream. We've experienced only the American Nightmare!"
Black.

Finally, "BOSTON" in white lettering against a black background. Boogie-Woogie piano music starts. A Coke billboard sitting just behind a subway track fades in - and only when the picture has come in completely do we see the subtitle under "BOSTON", "The War Years". We immediately move from the subway tracks, across the station, pass Woolworths, down the street to a shoeshine stand. Spike Lee in a zoot suit, wide rimmed hat (with feather), checks his shine, flips a tip, gets up and with his Cab Calloway lean heads directly into The Barbershop.

All of this, IN ONE TAKE, is right out of the opening of Orson Welles' Touch Of Evil, which, though much longer and undoubtedly more complex in composition (as Charlton Heston and Janet Leigh cross the Border guards) is given a very obvious nod.

This is really one of the more impressive openings that I've seen. Though I've seldom read or heard the opening or the homage to either Schaffner or Welles discussed. The sequence - as well as the film, in general - is very well edited and one of the salient aspects of Lee's craft. Perhaps it's because Lee is instinctively a comic that he places a particular emphasis on editing - timing being crucial to comedy and, more importantly, the emotional impact of his films. (Yet it's one of the things I loathed about Inside Man. There I think editing was used to hype up rather lukewarm content.) Unfotunately, the rest of the X is fairly straightforward, visually, following Malcolm X's autobiography faithfully, but not (frankly) inventively. It certainly doesn't repeat the visual thrill of the opening and occasionally laspes into high melodrama.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 11:23 pm 
~_~
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Location: NJ
MOST $100M+ HITS IN A CAREER
-including animated films & excluding cameos -
1. Tom Hanks – 15
2. Tom Cruise - 14
3. Eddie Murphy - 13
4. Will Smith – 12
4. Harrison Ford – 12
6. Jim Carrey – 11
6. Robin Williams - 11
8. Mel Gibson – 10
9. Matt Damon - 9
10. Bruce Willis – 8
10. Jack Nicholson – 8

Isn't it interesting that Will Smith has never worked with Spike Lee? Ever? You would think they would hope to work together once, no? I don't know what the relationship is between Murphy and Lee, but I know he's criticized Eddie, so that's probably out... Anyway, with Smith's new film Seven Pounds getting a terrible critical reception, you'd think he'd seek Lee out.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 4:52 am 
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I doubt it since Smith passed on Lee to direct Ali, and then Lee shit all over him and Michael Mann in the press. Of course, Lee worked with Denzel Washington after he was similarly pissy over Jewison's The Hurricane, despite the fact that Jewison had previously willingly handed over Malcolm X to Lee. Anything's possible I suppose.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 6:21 am 

Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 6:17 am
will smith was actually sopposed to be in bamboozled, but due to scheduling conflicts with another movie was not able to do it. they may work together in the future.... also on another smith/lee note... spike was really wanting to direct Ali and was almost able to direct, but it was taken away from him before production started because of fear that he would make it "too controversial"


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:24 pm 
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Location: Montreal, Quebec
exte wrote:
Anyway, with Smith's new film Seven Pounds getting a terrible critical reception, you'd think he'd seek Lee out.

Uh, why? Aside from Inside Man, mainstream America has little to no regard for anything Spike Lee does. Will Smith's modus operandi has been either to (a) become a popular moneymaker, in films with a broad appeal or (b) garner critical acclaim from emotionally manipulative, easily digestible claptrap like Seven Pounds. Also, given Smith's recent relationship Cruise and Scientology, I would doubt Lee wants anything to do with him.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2009 8:26 pm 
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He Got Game is one of Lee's more underrated efforts. After Hoosiers, probably the greatest fictional film ever made about b-ball. It desperately needs an anamorphic transfer.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2009 5:40 pm 
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I never really liked He Got Game, felt like Lee was almost Parodying himself, but he has managed three classics. That along with the guilty pleasure that is Summer of Sam I like Lee well enough of a filmmaker.
P.S. In case your curious what I think those three they're Do the Right Thing, Malcolm X, and The 25th Hour.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:41 am 
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Location: England
CallingPlanetEarth wrote:
knives wrote:
That along with the guilty pleasure that is Summer of Sam I like Lee well enough of a filmmaker.

Nothing to feel guilty about man, it's a solid film.

Apart from the dog barking scenes making the killer go all psycho and Adrien Brody's version of a punk, it really is a solid film.

Has anyone seen 4 Little Girls and is it any good? It's one of only a couple of Lee films that I haven't seen, but I'd have to import a copy to get to see it. From what I've seen, he's a very good documentary maker, so I'm hopeful.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2009 9:52 pm 
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Antoine Doinel wrote:
exte wrote:
Anyway, with Smith's new film Seven Pounds getting a terrible critical reception, you'd think he'd seek Lee out.

Uh, why? Aside from Inside Man, mainstream America has little to no regard for anything Spike Lee does. Will Smith's modus operandi has been either to (a) become a popular moneymaker, in films with a broad appeal or (b) garner critical acclaim from emotionally manipulative, easily digestible claptrap like Seven Pounds. Also, given Smith's recent relationship Cruise and Scientology, I would doubt Lee wants anything to do with him.

Isn't there something in the works that Tom is attached to that Spike will direct?


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:38 pm 
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flyonthewall2983 wrote:
Isn't there something in the works that Tom is attached to that Spike will direct?

I don't think so. The only chatter around Tom these days is a Cronenberg film with Denzel Washington in the other lead role, and a Hardy Boys film opposite Ben Stiller.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 6:34 pm 
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Spike Lee's next is a day-in-the-life documentary on Kobe Bryant, called Kobe Doin' Work. It will debut at the Tribeca Film Festival before running on ESPN.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 2:45 am 
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domino harvey wrote:
carax09 wrote:
I think you're absolutely right that Spike is a filmmaking natural, and he's released one masterpiece a decade, since he started making movies, to prove it. It saddened me to see that someone in the Inglorious Bastards thread made the assertion that Tarantino is the "superior" filmmaker. I'm not even sure what that means, but I can tell you that it's fightin words where I came from, and demonstrably false by any metric outside of average box office receipt.

While I agree that Do the Right Thing is a masterpiece, I have no idea what other films you're talking about with your One Masterpiece Per Decade declaration. I think comparing Lee and Tarantino is silly, but saying your personal preference is something that can be more correct than someone else's preference doesn't do your argument any favors.

Not that everyone will agree (since we all have different opinions and all), but I think the three masterpieces carax may have been referring to were Do The Right Thing (80's), Malcolm X (90's), and The 25th Hour (00's)...


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 11:09 pm 
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You're correct about the bookends, but for the 90's I was thinking of Crooklyn, a wonderful moving polaroid of an era (early 70's) when we knew our neighbors, and cared about them, even when they annoyed the shit out of us. As one would expect, Lindo and Woodard are excellent, but I'm amazed by the performances that Lee is able to get out of the children, especially the girl who plays Troy.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 4:03 pm 
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Antoine Doinel wrote:
Spike Lee's next is a day-in-the-life documentary on Kobe Bryant, called Kobe Doin' Work.

Here's the trailer.


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 Post subject: Re: Spike Lee
PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2009 3:00 pm 
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Rumor is that Kobe demanded creative control over Kobe Doin' Work and nearly deep sixed it.


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