Michelangelo Antonioni

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Michelangelo Antonioni

#1 Post by DarkImbecile » Tue Jan 17, 2006 1:25 pm

Michelangelo Antonioni (1912-2007)

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Lucretius, who was certainly one of the greatest poets who ever lived, once said, "Nothing appears as it should in a world where nothing is certain. The only thing certain is the existence of a secret violence that makes everything uncertain." Think about this for a moment. What Lucretius said of his time is still a disturbing reality, for it seems to me that this uncertainty is very much part of our own time. But this is unquestionably a philosophical matter. Now you really don't expect me to resolve such problems or propose any solutions? Inasmuch as I am the product of a middle-class society, and am preoccupied with making middle-class dramas, I am not equipped to do so. The middle class doesn't give me the means with which to resolve any middle-class problems. That's why I confine myself to pointing out existing problems without proposing any solutions. I think it is equally important to point out the problems as it is to propose solutions.

Filmography

Features
Cronaca di un amore AKA Story of a Love Affair (1950)
La signora senza camelie AKA The Lady Without Camelias (1953)
I vinti AKA The Vanquished (1953)
Le amiche AKA The Girl Friends (1955)
Il grido AKA The Cry (1957)
L'avventura (1960)
La notte (1961)
L'eclisse (1962)
Il deserto rosso AKA Red Desert (1964)
Blowup (1966)
Zabriskie Point (1970)
Chung Kuo, Cina [documentary] (1972)
Professione: reporter AKA The Passenger (1975)
Il mistero di Oberwald AKA The Mystery of Oberwald (1981)
Identificazione di una donna AKA Identification of a Woman (1982)
Al di la delle nuvole AKA Beyond the Clouds (1995)

Shorts
"Gente del Po" AKA "People of the Po Valley" (1943)
"Roma-Montevideo" (1948)
"Oltre l'oblio" (1948)
"N.U." AKA "Nettezza urbana" AKA "Dustmen" (1948)
"Superstizione" AKA "Superstition" (1949)
"Sette canne, un vestito" AKA "Seven Reeds, One Suit" (1949)
"Ragazze in bianco" AKA "Girls in White" (1949)
"Bomarzo" (1949)
"L'amorosa menzogna" AKA "Lies of Love" (1949)
"La villa dei mostri / The Villa of Monsters[/b] (1950)
"La funivia del faloria" AKA "The Funicular of Mount Faloria" (1950)
"Tentato suicido" AKA "When Love Fails" [segment from L'amore in citta AKA Love in the City] (1953)
"Il provino" {segment from I tre volti AKA The Three Faces of a Woman] (1965)
"Inserto girato a Lisca Blanca" (1983)
"Kumbha Mela" (1989)
"Roma" [segment from 12 registi per 12 citta ] (1989)
"Noto, Mandorli, Vulcano, Stromboli, Carnevale" AKA "Volcanoes and Carnival" (1993)
"Sicilia" (1997)
"Lo sguardo di Michelangelo" AKA "Michelangelo Eye to Eye" (2004)
"Il filo pericoloso delle cose" AKA "The Dangerous Thread of Things" [segment from Eros] (2004)

Books
That Bowling Alley on the Tiber: Tales of a Director by Michelangelo Antonioni (1987)
Unfinished Business: Screenplays, Scenarios, and Ideas by Michelangelo Antonioni (1998)
The Architecture of Vision: Writings and Interviews on Cinema by Michelangelo Antonioni and Marga Cottino-Jones, ed. (2007)

Antonioni by Ian Cameron and Robin Wood (1971)
Focus on Blow-up by Roy Huss, ed. (1972)
Antonioni, or, The Surface of the World by Seymour Chatman (1985)
Antonioni by Sam Rohdie (1990)
Antonioni: The Poet of Images by William Arrowsmith, ed. Ted Perry (1995)
The Films of Michelangelo Antonioni by Peter Brunette (1998)
My Time with Antonioni by Wim Wenders (2000)
Michelangelo Antonioni: The Complete Films by Seymour Chatman (2004)
Michelangelo Antonioni: Interviews by Bert Cardullo, ed. (2008)
Antonioni's Blow-Up by Philippe Garner (2011)
Michelangelo Red Antonioni Blue: Eight Reflections on Cinema by Murray Pomerance (2011)
Antonioni: Centenary Essays by Laura Rascaroli & John David Rhodes, eds. (2011)

Internet Resources
"Entretien" by Michelangelo Antonioni, Cahiers du cinema (1960)
1965 interview with Pierre Billard, Cinema
1967 interview with Curtis Pepper, Playboy
1969 interview with Charles Thomas Samuels
1969 interview with Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times
"A Vicious Motive, Despicable Tricks: A Criticism of M. Antonioni's Anti-China Film China", Peking Review (1974)
1983 interview with Gideon Bachmann, Film Quarterly
"A Cinema of Uncertainty" by Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader (1993)
"Antonioni's The Passenger as Lacanian Text" by Jack Turner, Other Voices (1999)
"Michelangelo Antonioni: Passenger" by Derek Malcolm, The Guardian (2000)
"The Gaze of Antonioni" by Jonathan Rosenbaum (2004)
"Michelangelo and I" by Enrica Antonioni (2004)
"Trust me. I am not God, but I am Antonioni", by Peter Bowles, The Guardian (2005)
"Antonioni's Nothingness and Beauty" by Stephen Holden, The New York Times (2006)
"Michelangelo Antonioni: Centenary of a Forgotten Giant" by Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian (2012)
"Rockefeller's Melancholy" by Luc Moullet, La Furia Umana (2012)
"'When Ordinary Seeing Fails': Reclaiming the Art of Documentary in Mechelangelo Antonioni's 1972 China Film Chung Kuo" by Alice Xiang, Senses of Cinema (2013)
"Chasing the Desert: An Interview with Enrica Fico on Her Work with Michelangelo Antonioni", by Eleonora Raspi, Senses of Cinema (2016)
"The Emotional Historiography of Michelangelo Antonioni's L'eclisse", by Richard Read, Screening the Past (2016)
"The Disturbing Relevance of 'Blow-Up'" by Elena Lazic, Movie Mezzanine (2016)
"Forgotten Masterpiece: Antonioni's Travelogue From China" by J. Hoberman, The New York Times (2017)
"Journey to the East" by Nick Pinkerton, Artforum (2018)

Forum Discussions
Michelangelo Antonioni 1912-2007
I Vinti (Antonioni)
BD 17-18 La signora senza camelie & Le amiche
817 Le amiche
Le Cri / Il Grido (Antonioni)
82 Il grido
98 L'avventura
61 / BD 47 La notte
678 La notte
278 L'eclisse
Red Desert (Antonioni, 1964)
522 Red Desert
866 Blow-Up
Zabriskie Point
49 The Passenger
The Passenger
Identification of a Woman (Antonioni)
585 Identification of a Woman
Il filo pericoloso delle cose (Antonioni, 2004)

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tryavna
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#2 Post by tryavna » Tue Jan 17, 2006 3:59 pm

justeleblanc wrote:I'm not sure if this is where I should post this message, but I'm a film student who is on the waiting list for this Italian cinema class, and it looks like I will not be able to take this class... how terrible. I was interested in taking it because I've heard a lot about Antonioni and I've never seen any of his films. Do you guys know of which films to watch first and maybe also what critical books to read? I spoke to the TA in hopes that maybe he'd give me an extra syllabus, but both he and the professor seem rather unresponsive.
They didn't eve give you a syllabus? Wow! Since when did college professors stop being interested in self-motivated students?

Anyhoo, perhaps the best beginner's introduction to Antonioni -- and Italian film history in general -- is Scorsese's excellent documentary My Voyage to Italy. It's mainly about the Neo-Realist movement, but it ends with a nice discussion of Antonioni's trilogy (L'avventura, La notte, and L'eclisse). It's available on DVD, and your college/uni really ought to have it available in its media center.

By the way, the trilogy is probably the best place to start, as L'Avventura and L'eclisse are available on Criterion DVDs, with lots of nice extras. My own personal favorite of Antonioni's films (and arguably his best known) is the English-language Blowup. But you can't go wrong by starting with any of those four films.

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justeleblanc
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#3 Post by justeleblanc » Wed Jan 18, 2006 5:02 pm

Thanks, it looks like I'll start with L'avventura then listen to the commentary. Then I'll probably jump to Blowup.

The joke is that they mentioned they would show Antonioni in the course description, but after looking at the syllabus (he just didn't have any extra copies at the time) they actually wont be showing Antonioni. But I'll have my own private screenings on my friends huge ass TV.

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tryavna
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#4 Post by tryavna » Wed Jan 18, 2006 5:07 pm

justeleblanc wrote:Thanks, it looks like I'll start with L'avventura then listen to the commentary. Then I'll probably jump to Blowup.
Sounds like a good plan. By the way, don't bother listening to the commentary track on Blowup. It's a waste of time.

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blindside8zao
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#5 Post by blindside8zao » Thu Jan 19, 2006 4:47 pm

I recently decided to check Antonioni out for the first time too. The L'avventura Criterion disc is very good. The film is wonderful and the commentary is also great. He offers a very good formal analysis of the work, which is probably something you are looking for as a film student. I haven't watched much on the second disc but I can only assume it's good. The essays read by Nicholson are pretty lengthy, though I might have preferred to have them in print (a lot of the first one is in the booklet.)

I recently got L'eclisse as a follow-up but haven't watched it yet.

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jesus the mexican boi
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#6 Post by jesus the mexican boi » Thu Jan 19, 2006 5:45 pm

blindside8zao wrote:I recently got L'eclisse as a follow-up but haven't watched it yet.
La notte! La notte! If you're going to watch the trilogy, I think it's best to see them in order, because there is a logical progression. And more of a sense of La Vitti as the chameleon at the heart of it all.

I may be in the minority, but I love La notte. The OOP Image DVD is barebones and of fair quality, but worth seeking out. A caveat to watching Scorsese's Il mi viaggio -- he gives away the ending of L'eclisse (and other films). Not so much a primer as a reflection.

I actually saw La notte first, and Vitti's was the role that wowed me. I love that scene with the compact on the checker board floor. She is a little bit of magic; you just want to crawl into that dress with her and slide, slide, slide. Did I say that out loud?

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blindside8zao
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#7 Post by blindside8zao » Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:07 pm

I'm going to wait til criterion releases La notte to spend the money. I think there's a consensus it will be released this year? I have enough new Criterions to last me until later this year. Maybe I should shelf it and watch other stuff til La notte comes out?

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orlik
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#8 Post by orlik » Fri Dec 01, 2006 5:00 pm

Everything 'clicked' for me with Blow Up, which laid the groundwork for Red Desert. Notwithstanding the always unappealing presence of Richard Harris, Red Desert is an incredibly rich work of art but might be a bit daunting if it's the first Antonioni film you see.

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david hare
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#9 Post by david hare » Fri Dec 01, 2006 5:34 pm

Strangely Red Desert WAS the first Antonioni I saw, quickly followed by Blowup (in the mid sixties.) I was hooked from the start.

Is La notte REALLY a certainty for Criterion (there is a recent restoration)? If not just buy the Fox Lorber - although interlaced the picture quality is quite ok (superb for them) and correctly masked at 1.66.

Watch him chronologically and you see a pattern of increasing abandonment of linear narrative in favour of psychological depth through the formal elements of the movies. Certainly L'eclisse, Red Desert[/i] and Zabriskie Point stand out in this respect leading to the wonderful The Passenger in which narrative (at the level of personal identity/identity theft) makes a return. Interestingly Altman had also been pursuing just these very issues during the seventies with Images and Three Women.

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#10 Post by David Ehrenstein » Fri Dec 01, 2006 9:15 pm

L'eclisse is my favorite, followed by Cronica di un amore, Red Desert, Blowup and L'avventura. Zabriskie Point is a magnificent failure.

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GringoTex
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#11 Post by GringoTex » Fri Dec 01, 2006 9:46 pm

David Ehrenstein wrote:L'Eclisse is my favorite, followed by Cronica di un Amore, Red Desert, Blow-Up and L'Avventura. Zabriskie Point is a magnificent failure.
I really had a difficult time with Cronica di un Amore - there's something highly unsettling about the film and Antonioni's strict formalism isn't yet present to make it go down easier. I need to watch it again at some point.

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david hare
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#12 Post by david hare » Sat Dec 02, 2006 5:32 am

I understand what you mean. There's the class issue for a start, which comes back to haunt a couple of the early Antonionis, until il Grido. They seem formally uncomfortable at first viewing (certainly Steve Cochran and Alida Valli) but become more moving with later acquaintance.

(Sorry folks, pissed as a snake after my once a year lunch with the four remaining cinephiles in Sydney. And one didn't even turn up... blahblahblah...) Fucking Christmas.

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#13 Post by David Ehrenstein » Sat Dec 02, 2006 11:24 am

Actually Cronica is Antonioni at his most formal. read what Noel Burch has to say abou it in Theory of Film Practice.

I find Lucia Bose truly enchanting in the film -- remindful in some ways of Maria Casares in Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne. The scene where she passes through a chic salon while a fashion show is in progress is quite something.

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david hare
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#14 Post by david hare » Mon Dec 04, 2006 5:41 pm

I agree, Cronaca is a favorite from the early pictures. Entirely successful performances (unlike Le amiche), especially Bose. And I am extremely fond of Il grido - much and unfairly maligned. Betsy Blair and Cochran (honk!) make a riveting pair and the movie is a stepping stone to the trilogy and the de-dramatization of narrative. I wish there was a decent DVD of it - the Kino is crap.

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jesus the mexican boi
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#15 Post by jesus the mexican boi » Mon Dec 04, 2006 6:24 pm

I'll butt in again and say while I sang the heady praises of La notte (Monica Vitti), I didn't also give a shout-out (apropos) to Il grido. I was really moved by this film; and I think the roadside backdrop prefigures Deserto rosso much as the man/woman/child motif is revisited there. Cochran holds the screen at all times--as we are intrigued by his brute physicality, his not-quite-Italian ethnic air, his brooding manhood. I agree, the Kino DVD is piss-poor, but I bought it up immediately after Netflixing the film a few years back. Hopefully Criterion will see fit to give us a restored disc. And I'm still waiting on a new La notte.

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david hare
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#16 Post by david hare » Mon Dec 04, 2006 7:27 pm

Cochran holds the screen at all times--as we are intrigued by his brute physicality, his not-quite-Italian ethnic air, his brooding manhood.
Hubba Hubba! (Also totally hot in the Damned Don't Cry.)

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blindside8zao
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#17 Post by blindside8zao » Mon Dec 04, 2006 10:43 pm

I heard Eros is a good place to start. I'm glad I didn't shelf L'eclisse way back then, though. Still waiting on La notte.

Commander Shears
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#18 Post by Commander Shears » Mon Dec 04, 2006 11:50 pm

As a major fan of Antonioni, I am pained to say that Eros is not a good place to start so much as it is a good place to avoid at all costs. Unless you are trying to work your way up in quality, that is.

To be fair, the other two entries are worthwhile (especially if you're an Alan Arkin fan). Age, stroke, or just having lost 'it', there is no shortage of legitimate excuses, but Antonioni's entry is an embaressment

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david hare
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#19 Post by david hare » Tue Dec 05, 2006 12:13 am

Agreed. Apart from playing like a National Lampoon parody of Antonioni's style, the performances and delivery of the two leads are so execrable as to make Daria and Mark in Zabriskie Point look positively Shakespearian. The Sodebergh ep's also a waste of space, but the Wong is superb.

marty

#20 Post by marty » Tue Dec 05, 2006 2:24 am

I recently attended the Antonioni retrospective they had here in Melbourne, Australia last month. The trilogy of L'avventura, La notte and L'eclisse were just astonishing films. I must get the CC versions of them and, hopefully, La notte will also be released next year - has this been confirmed? I also saw Red Desert and The Passenger both in glorious colour and his use of colour is amazing. I also loved Antonioni's framing as its quite exquisite and an art onto itself. Any frame can be used as a painting. Red Desert requires several viewings and the final shot of The Passenger is just brilliant. I didn't see Zabriskie Point but many noted that the film is a disaster and a snooze-fest but I find this hard to believe.

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ellipsis7
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#21 Post by ellipsis7 » Tue Dec 05, 2006 5:10 am

The most important piece on the R1 Eros disc is the short Lo sguardo di Michelangelo (The Gaze of Michelangelo) which is Antonioni on really top form... Simply superb! See Jonathan Rosenbaum in Rouge.

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justeleblanc
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#22 Post by justeleblanc » Tue Dec 05, 2006 11:36 am

marty wrote:I didn't see Zabriskie Point but many noted that the film is a disaster and a snooze-fest but I find this hard to believe.
It's not a disaster. The acting is weak at times, but I loved it. It carries some effective punches.

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Andre Jurieu
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#23 Post by Andre Jurieu » Tue Dec 05, 2006 12:08 pm

Commander Shears wrote:As a major fan of Antonioni, I am pained to say that Eros is not a good place to start so much as it is a good place to avoid at all costs. Unless you are trying to work your way up in quality, that is.

Age, stroke, or just having lost 'it', there is no shortage of legitimate excuses, but Antonioni's entry is an embaressment
davidhare wrote:Apart from playing like a National Lampoon parody of Antonioni's style, the performances and delivery of the two leads are so execrable as to make Daria and Mark in Zabriskie Point look positively Shakespearian.
Yeah, I concur completely. Like the Commander, I'm also a major Antonioni fan, but his segment was one of the worst cinematic experiences of my whole life, mostly because I essentially spent $400 (for my plane ticket) to see the film and was utterly disappointed by Antonioni's segment.

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Barmy
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#24 Post by Barmy » Tue Dec 05, 2006 2:20 pm

Zabriskie Point is one of the most beautifully photographed films of all time (although I have issues with the quality of the new print that is now circulating). To me it is his most aesthetically appealing work. I can understand people having issues with the acting (using "stars" would have completely ruined the film), but I don't see "snooze-fest".

Rosenbaum's review of Eye to Eye is a joke. It's just a nice short. However, having visited that church in Rome this summer, I can attest to MA's skill in making that sculpture look much more amazing than it actually is.

I love Eros, although the English language version (not on the US DVD) is the one to watch. Yes, it's weird and insane. What's wrong with that?

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ellipsis7
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#25 Post by ellipsis7 » Tue Dec 04, 2007 7:47 am

Had a chance to watch that new 2 disc + book Italian release of CINA CHUNG KUO...

Image

It's a nice package and a decent transfer of unrestored print, generally clean and clear, but showing some dirt, sparkle, scratches and signs of aging - not untoward in that the source material was Super 16mm, shot in the Spring of 1972, so the negative is now 35 years old...

While there are no English or Italian subtitles (the film does not even attempt to translate the Chinese speaking into Italian subs), there are relatively brief passages of Italian narration...

It's actually not hard to follow, in that the point is to go with the flow and follow Antonioni's remarkable eye, that so enraged the Chinese authorities that they banned the film until recently, and issued an English language pamphlet attacking the film in 1974... It starts as follows...
A VICIOUS MOTIVE, DESPICABLE TRICKS - A Criticism of M. Antonioni's Anti-China Film China

Renmin Ribao Commentator

FOREIGN LANGUAGES PRESS

PEKING 1974 [page 1]

SINCE the day the five-star red flag was hoisted over Tien An Men Square and the birth of the new China was proclaimed, different political forces in the world have assumed different attitudes towards the earth-shaking social changes in China and the tremendous achievements of her socialist construction. Hundreds of millions of revolutionary people and friends all over the world have voiced admiration and sympathy, while a handful of reactionary forces are filled with great terror and deep hatred. This is what all great revolutions, whether in China or other lands, in ancient times or today, invariably meet. The anti-China film China by the Italian director M. Antonioni, which started showing in some Western countries last year, reflects the attitude of the tiny handful of imperialists and social-imperialists in the present-day world who have inveterate hatred for the new China. The appearance of this film is a serious anti-China event and a frenzied provocation against the Chinese people.

Antonioni came to China as our guest in the spring of 1972. with his camera, he visited Peking, Shanghai, Nanking, Soochow and Linhsien County. However, his purpose in making the visit was not to increase his understanding of China, still less promote the friendship between the people of China and Italy. Hostile towards the Chinese people, he took the opportunity of his visit for unspeakable purposes; by underhand and utterly despicable means he hunted specifically for material that could be used to slander and attack China. His three-and-half-hour-long film does not at all reflect the new things, new spirit and new face of our great motherland, but lumps together a large number of viciously distorted scenes and shots to attack Chinese leaders, smear the socialist new China, slander China's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution and insult the Chinese people. Any Chinese with any national pride cannot but be greatly angered on seeing this film. Tolerating such a film and permitting it to deceive people in various places would be tantamount to legitimizing reactionary propaganda that wilfully insults the Chinese people and capitulating to anti-China provocations by the international reactionaries. In reply to this challenge hurled at the Chinese people by the international reactionaries, we will thoroughly expose and criticize this film's counter-[2] revolutionary nature. This is a serious struggle on the ideological and political front that merits great attention.

The Italian director claims in his narration, "We do not pretend to explain China. We only want to begin to observe this great repertoire of faces, gestures and habits" in China. This is a downright fraud. Every scene in the "documentary" makes its own explanation. These are scurrilous political explanations which use reactionary artistry to slander and smear China; they are outright reckless political attacks on China, on communism and on the revolution.

It seems quite natural that Tien An Men Square is shown as the film begins. In fact, this is designed to serve the reactionary theme of the "documentary." The narrator says: "Peking is the political and revolutionary centre of China," "the People's Republic was proclaimed here " "and here passed the waves of Red Guards marching for the Cultural Revolution." Then, the film leads the spectators away from Tien An Men Square to "observe" China, supposedly to see what the Chinese revolution has brought the Chinese people. A series of reactionary scenes follow, distorting the [3] new China beyond recognition. This structure and composition of the film is designed solely for the purpose of concentrating its attack on the revolution led by the Communist Party of China. And here lies the nub of this film - reviling the revolution, negating it and opposing it.

This reactionary film completely ignores and totally negates the tremendous achievements China has made on all fronts of socialist construction, trying to make people believe that today's socialist new China is not much different from the semi-feudal, semi-colonial old China of the past.
Full text of the pamphlet helpfully online here

It's a key film in his oeuvre, and it's really great that it's now out there... It shows just how subversive his style of filmmaking can be - the all seeing eye, the persistent penetrating gaze...

The DVD is the 3 part 207 minute Italian (RAI) TV version as opposed to French TV Version (130 mins) or the US TV version (104 minutes)... The script (or rather transcript and description) of it can also be picked up in Italian...

Also IDENTIFICATION OF A WOMAN has been flagged for R2 UK release in 2008 on the Mr Bongo label...

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