King Vidor

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Gregory
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 4:07 pm

Re: King Vidor

#76 Post by Gregory » Thu Mar 10, 2016 6:38 pm

Revelator wrote:Good news--Not So Dumb (1930) will be released on DVD through the Warner Archive: http://www.wbshop.com/product/code/1000597297.do?
From what I understand, it's the least of the Vidor-Davies films, but any Vidor is good Vidor.

This leaves 16 Vidor films unavailable on DVD:

The Other Half (1919)
The Family Honor (1920)
The Jack-Knife Man (1920)
The Sky Pilot (1921)
Conquering the Woman (1922)
Peg o' My Heart (1922)
Three Wise Fools (1923)
Happiness (1924)
Wine of Youth (1924)
His Hour (1924)
Proud Flesh (1925)
The Crowd (1928)
Cynara (1932)
The Stranger's Return (1933)
So Red the Rose (1935)
Beyond the Forest (1949)

As you can see, most are from his early silent period, with only four sound titles. Of the latter, Beyond the Forest is both a camp classic and a black-edged portrait of small town America, Cynara is an underrated romance about class and privilege, and The Stranger's Return is a hidden gem about adulterous feelings on the farm. It was a flop, along with several other films in rural settings, which prompted Variety's immortal headline "STICKS NIX HICK PIX."
Beyond the Forest came out a couple of years ago (as La Garce) on a fine DVD in "La Collection TCM," a series mainly comprising titles that have come out via Warner Archive in the US, with the notable exception of Beyond the Forest, so maybe that one will finally come out from WAC one of these days, or not.
I'd recommend Beyond... as a worthwhile import either way, not just for admirers of King Vidor but also anyone looking for a great example of the familiar 1940s vamp placed in a rural rather than an urban setting.

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domino harvey
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: King Vidor

#77 Post by domino harvey » Thu Mar 10, 2016 6:45 pm

It is remarkable that the film with the second-most famous Bette Davis line ever never managed to find its way into any of those Warner Davis boxes. Maybe they were saving it for the never-materialized fourth volume

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swo17
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:25 am
Location: SLC, UT

Re: King Vidor

#78 Post by swo17 » Thu Mar 10, 2016 6:52 pm

domino harvey wrote:the film with the second-most famous Bette Davis line ever
Is that the film that originated
SpoilerShow
Joe Eszterhas comes again

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domino harvey
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: King Vidor

#79 Post by domino harvey » Thu Mar 10, 2016 6:56 pm


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Gregory
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 4:07 pm

Re: King Vidor

#80 Post by Gregory » Thu Mar 10, 2016 7:28 pm

The Davis line that she repeated most often herself may have been this one here, from her earlier "rural vamp" role in The Cabin in the Cotton, which I'm sure some others here will remember from the latest Forbidden Hollywood set. It's a very "pre-Code" line, and I wonder how many who heard her say it in interviews in subsequent years thought it was just some silly coquettish thing to say and didn't get the implication (wanting to avoid just-been-fucked hair).

Jonathan S
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:31 am
Location: Somerset, England

Re: King Vidor

#81 Post by Jonathan S » Fri Mar 11, 2016 4:56 am

Reportedly, Warner have (or did have) rights problems with Beyond the Forest - perhaps related to its literary source? If true, I wonder if these were cleared up before the French release, or if the problems are only in certain territories. Does it play on US TCM? I've always found it a vital and fascinating film, which grows on each viewing for me, unlike the talkfest All About Eve, which Davis and all the critics considered her great comeback after Vidor's "disaster".

Coincidentally, Vidor's silent Peg o' My Heart has (only?) been televised on French TCM, but after the opening reel in Ireland it's a mostly stagey and routine poor-girl-reforms-her-stuffy-rich-relatives picture, with the 38 year-old Laurette Taylor even more unconvincing than Mary Pickford as a teenager. The broadcast print seemed to suffer from gaps which were not disguised or bridged.

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Ann Harding
Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2008 6:26 am
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Re: King Vidor

#82 Post by Ann Harding » Fri Mar 11, 2016 5:34 am

You can watch The Other Half (1919) online on the European Film Gateway

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rohmerin
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 10:36 am
Location: Spain

Re: King Vidor

#83 Post by rohmerin » Fri Mar 11, 2016 7:32 am

I've always liked Beyond the forest, there's a Spanish VHS turn into DVD in Spain "Más allá del bosque".
The crowd is out in France, Spain and Italy but I think the image is not good (the Spanish one, dunno about the others).

https://www.amazon.es/s/ref=nb_sb_noss? ... King+Vidor" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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