Jean-Luc Godard

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liquid_city
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#876 Post by liquid_city » Mon Jul 22, 2013 2:48 am

Numero Trois wrote:
criterion10 wrote: I found both of them to be utterly insufferable, easily two of the worst films I have ever seen. Is it worth it to even attempt any other of these later films, or are the two I watched good indicators of what I am in for?
It probably bears repeating once again that films as challenging as these in most cases require multiple viewings to absorb the details. It's usually never going to gel enough after a single viewing to really know if one likes the film or not, let alone make sense of it. Godard himself said that Notre Musique (or was it Forever Mozart?) needed to be viewed about four times just to take it all in.

I always wind up recommending In Praise of Love because its visual and tonal lushness makes it easier to tune into his usual astringent personality.
If you like the end scenes of In Praise of Love (or the "Hell" segment of Notre musique) be sure to look into films like Histoire(s) du cinéma and its underrated cousin pieces like The Old Place and L'origine du XXIe siècle. In my opinion these films are the peak of Godard's career and his most "pure" films if that makes sense.

rrenault
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#877 Post by rrenault » Tue Jul 30, 2013 8:15 am

I know deep down Godard simply resents the way his early features have become the victims of bourgeois hagiography, although he sometimes appears to outright disown them, even if it's not really true. With that said, it almost seems as though one is put on a guilt trip by him for even daring to love Breathless or Vivre Sa Vie. What do others think?

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feckless boy
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#878 Post by feckless boy » Tue Jul 30, 2013 9:07 am

rrenault wrote:I know deep down Godard simply resents the way his early features have become the victims of bourgeois hagiography, although he sometimes appears to outright disown them, even if it's not really true. With that said, it almost seems as though one is put on a guilt trip by him for even daring to love Breathless or Vivre Sa Vie. What do others think?
I really don't understand how films can be victims of "bourgeois hagiography", or how you interpret those two words. Take a deep breath, sober up and try again!

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FerdinandGriffon
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#879 Post by FerdinandGriffon » Tue Jul 30, 2013 9:42 am

rrenault wrote:I know deep down Godard simply resents the way his early features have become the victims of bourgeois hagiography, although he sometimes appears to outright disown them, even if it's not really true. With that said, it almost seems as though one is put on a guilt trip by him for even daring to love Breathless or Vivre Sa Vie. What do others think?
What in his films or interviews makes you so certain of this deep seated resentment, and when do you think he guilt trips you for loving early works?

As far as I know, he's only ever come close (during a single brief interview) to disowning just three films: A Woman is a Woman, Band of Outsiders and Made in USA. The latter two are the only two Godard films I don't care much for myself, but I've always been puzzled by his disdain for A Woman is a Woman, as it seems so key to the development of his use of sound and color.

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repeat
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#880 Post by repeat » Tue Jul 30, 2013 10:01 am

I don't have the Interviews book on hand right now, but I'm pretty sure he more or less disowned Contempt in the 1970's as well, and precisely as a "bourgeois" film.

sdyoung
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#881 Post by sdyoung » Wed Jul 31, 2013 2:46 pm

repeat wrote:I don't have the Interviews book on hand right now, but I'm pretty sure he more or less disowned Contempt in the 1970's as well, and precisely as a "bourgeois" film.
Godard is a contrarian and even in regards to evaluating his work. So, I think you have to regard those kind of statements in the context of which they were stated. Even on the Contempt Blu-Ray extra, he's alternately reflective and critical of the film....

Mathew2468
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#882 Post by Mathew2468 » Wed Jul 31, 2013 9:07 pm

He said all kinds of ridiculous things in the late '60s and '70s, like calling Au hasard Balthazar "disgusting" because of its catholicism. This was maybe 2 years after praising it. It was a phase...

criterion10
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#883 Post by criterion10 » Thu Aug 22, 2013 12:29 am

While vacationing in California, I stumbled upon an excellent DVD/VHS rental store (Cinefile, for those who are familiar with it. While there, I came across two VHS tapes that were for sale of Godard films that I assumed were rare: King Lear and JLG/JLG. I picked up both immediately (even though my VHS player is currently broken).

So, I ask, is the Italian DVD of King Lear projecting the film improperly, as it is in a 1.85:1 aspect ratio. From what I understand, most Godard films from this era are in a 1.33:1 aspect ratio. The VHS is obviously shown in this ratio, and if this is the proper ratio, I won't even bother with importing the current and only DVD release.

Finding JLG/JLG made me very excited, since, from what I understand, that one hasn't made it to DVD yet, and the Amazon prices are fetching upwards of $100. I only paid $10 for the VHS tape :D

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domino harvey
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#884 Post by domino harvey » Thu Aug 22, 2013 12:39 am

The King Lear DVD is incorrectly matted into widescreen, it is most def shot and intended in 1.33 and the VHS accurately represents this

criterion10
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#885 Post by criterion10 » Thu Aug 22, 2013 12:58 am

Good news. It seems as though many of Godard's 1.33:1 films have been cropped on their DVD releases (I remember the DVD of For Ever Mozart being like this, and I think In Praise of Love suffered a similar fate).

yoshimori
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#886 Post by yoshimori » Thu Aug 22, 2013 2:40 am

criterion10 wrote:Finding JLG/JLG made me very excited, since, from what I understand, that one hasn't made it to DVD yet
JLG/JLG is available on DVD with English subs in the Gaumont Godard box.

Mathew2468
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#887 Post by Mathew2468 » Thu Aug 22, 2013 9:50 am

You can also buy it individually. With these shorts apparently:

La paresse
Le grand escroc
Anticipation
Lettre à Freddy Buache
Meetin' WA

criterion10
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#888 Post by criterion10 » Thu Aug 22, 2013 12:49 pm

yoshimori wrote:JLG/JLG is available on DVD with English subs in the Gaumont Godard box.
Didn't realize that. Guess that doesn't make my VHS so rare after all.

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tavernier
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#889 Post by tavernier » Thu Sep 05, 2013 5:54 pm

New retro at Film Society of Lincoln Center:
New York, NY (September 5, 2013) -- The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced today that the 51st New York Film Festival (NYFF, September 27 – October 13) will serve as the launching pad for a retrospective of filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard’s work. The film series, entitled Jean-Luc Godard - The Spirit of the Forms, will begin during the second week of the festival, on October 9, and continue through the end of the month, October 30. (Specifics for the schedule and titles playing after NYFF will be distributed next week.) This year’s NYFF will also play host to the 20th Anniversary screening of Richard Linklater’s DAZED AND CONFUSED on October 10 at 9PM, presented by New Wave, and with the director and members of the cast in attendance.

Reflecting on the retrospective, NYFF Director of Programming and Selection Committee Chair Kent Jones said, “No matter how many times you’ve seen VIVRE SA VIE or FRANCE/TOUR/DETOUR/DEUX ENFANTS or NOUVELLE VAGUE, you can never know them completely: their beauties run as deep as their mysteries, their disturbances and disjunctions are as numerous as their revelations. Whenever they appear to settle into a fixed rhythm, they upend and reconfigure themselves in order to arrive at another rhythm pitched at a higher level. Godard’s work, whether it’s on film, video or HD, unfolds like no one else’s, and shocks the viewer into a new relationship with the world and with images.”

Between 1955 and today, Godard has made 45 shorts, 11 medium-length films, 40 features, three television series, a handful of commercials, and several of his own trailers. Throughout every “period” of his working life—his early heyday with the French New Wave, his explicitly political films made in collaboration with Jean-Pierre Gorin in the aftermath of May ’68 in France, his collaborative television and video work in Switzerland during the 70s with Anne-Marie Miéville, his movement between film and video from the 80s onward—he has always continually ventured into new territory.

Six Fois Deux (1976), France/Tour/Détour/Deux enfants (1979) and Histoire(s) du cinema, Godard’s three monumental series, will screen during the retrospective. Opening night on October 9 kicks off with the premieres of a new DCP of Alphaville (1965) from Rialto Pictures and a new print of Hail Mary/The Book of Mary (1985), followed by a new DCP of For Ever Mozart (1996) on Oct 11, both from The Cohen Media Group.

A longtime favorite of the film festival from its inception, Jean-Luc Godard’s films have frequently screened as part of NYFF’s Main Slate. Among the many NYFF-screened films that will be revisited during the retrospective will be; LE PETIT SOLDAT (1960), A WOMAN IS A WOMAN (1961), LES CARABINIERS (1962), BAND OF OUTSIDERS (1964), ALPHAVILLE (1965), PIERROT LE FOU (1965), MADE IN U.S.A. (1966), MASCULIN FÉMININ (1966), 2 OR 3 THINGS I KNOW ABOUT HER (1966), WEEKEND (1967), LE GAI SAVOIR (1968), WIND FROM THE EAST (1969), TOUT VA BIEN (1972), Every Man for Himself (1979), HAIL MARY (1985), NOUVELLE VAGUE (1990), IN PRAISE OF LOVE (2001), NOTRE MUSIQUE (2004) and FILM SOCIALISME (2010).

Jean-Luc Godard - The Spirit of the Forms is co-curated by Kent Jones and Jake Perlin. Special thanks to Bruce Goldstein, Adrienne Halpern and Eric Di Bernardo at Rialto Pictures; Tim Lanza at The Cohen Media Group; Morgane Toulouse at Gaumont; Antonin Baudry, Muriel Guidoni and Florence Almozini at French Cultural Services; Sarah Finklea at Janus Films; Rebecca Cleman at Electronic Arts Intermix; Gary Palmucci and Richard Lorber at Koch-Lorber Films; and Hanna Bruhin at Swiss Films.

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andyli
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#890 Post by andyli » Thu Sep 05, 2013 7:56 pm

Hmm... Le mépris is conspicuously absent, but it's playing in a 50th anniversary restored print starting this Friday at Film Forum.

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knives
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#891 Post by knives » Tue Oct 29, 2013 1:07 am

It seems someone has put the whole (split into 12 parts) of France/ Tour/ Detour/ Deux/ Enfants onto youtube. I'm not aware of it being available on disc so this is a good opportunity.

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foe
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#892 Post by foe » Fri Jan 10, 2014 6:24 pm

Sorry if that issue was raised here before. Just received Godard's 10 DVD box from amazon.fr - is there a chance to get English subtitles for "Conversations avec JLG" (one and only disc that is deprived of English subs) somewhere off internet?

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Oedipax
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#893 Post by Oedipax » Sat Mar 22, 2014 5:27 pm

Did you scan it already? You could upload it to imgur.com and paste the link here, no account needed. Thanks for doing it!

It seems the complete discussion between Godard and Serge Daney (excerpted in Histoire(s) du cinéma 2A) will be shown here in unedited form. Hope it makes it to DVD at some point.

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Michael Kerpan
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#894 Post by Michael Kerpan » Thu May 08, 2014 11:21 pm

Watched "Forever Mozart" -- didn't _hate_ it -- but must say that I found it particularly inscrutable (and it wasn't as visually appealing as some of his 80s work (like Passion and My Name Is Carmen).

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Oedipax
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#895 Post by Oedipax » Fri May 09, 2014 12:26 am

I finally got around to For Ever Mozart a month or so ago (occasioned by the bluray's release) and my heel-dragging based upon what I'd read was more or less validated; it's definitely lesser Godard, but perhaps not as inscrutable to me even as some of his films I love. What really was lacking was the sheer aesthetic power that makes the effort of watching his late films worthwhile in the first place.

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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#896 Post by muzunova » Tue May 20, 2014 6:15 pm

Some of the readers of this forum might be interested to know that JLG's book 'Introduction to a True History of Cinema and Television' has now been released.

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NABOB OF NOWHERE
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#897 Post by NABOB OF NOWHERE » Wed May 21, 2014 12:04 pm

http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/Jea ... ign=buffer" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Cross posted on Cannes 2014 thread JLG on Adieu with subs

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Galen Young
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#898 Post by Galen Young » Wed May 21, 2014 7:36 pm

Happy to pass along I received a copy of the first English translation of JLG's Introduction to a True History of Cinema and Television published by Caboose and it was well worth the wait. Beautifully printed and having the interview questions re-united with the text makes for much coherent reading than the old French edition.

Numero Trois
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#899 Post by Numero Trois » Sat Jul 19, 2014 6:59 pm


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Oedipax
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#900 Post by Oedipax » Sat Jul 19, 2014 8:50 pm

That's great, I wish he'd subtitled the entire Détective exchange. Could've also done without the horrible meme/trollface thing but I suppose that's life on the internet these days.

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