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PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2012 6:33 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 3:26 am
Location: East of Shanghai
Looking at the schedule, none of my recs are even playing except for Veronika Voss.
That link lists all of them as belonging to Janus Films.
That's a dozen Fassbinder's besides the 4 already out on CC.
Is this accurate?
Fassbinder Eclipse(s)?


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PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2012 11:09 am 
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I'm not sure that anything has been confirmed but there's some speculation here.


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PostPosted: Sun May 20, 2012 5:04 pm 
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Lemmy Caution wrote:
Maybe others could comment on which Fassbinder's would benefit most from a theatrical viewing.
I'm thinking World on a Wire and Despair, but maybe that's just because I've seen them fairly recently. There was a lot to like in Wire, but it became attenuated in the second part of its nearly 3.5 hour runtime.

I've been lucky enough to see about half of my thirty-something Fassbinders in an honest-to-goodness cinema, and I'd recommend the more lavish and baroque ones. Effi Briest is a stunning-looking film, and its white-on-white delicacy is much harder to appreciate on a small screen in standard definition. Veronika Voss is another silvery stunner in a good print. Chinese Roulette and Martha and Petra von Kant are also great cinematic experiences - the scale of the performances demands a big arena. Basically, the films in which he was most overtly striving for Sirkian grandeur should be seen in Sirkian conditions.

A number of the 16mm TV productions (including World on a Wire) and the early, grungy minimalist films probably don't gain anywhere near as much from the transition to the big screen, but Berlin Alexanderplatz is a big exception, even though it was designed for television. If you can see it in one or two big lumps, stuck in a theatre with strangers, it's an electrifying experience, and every grain of meaning you can extract from the low-contrast photography is worth it.


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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 6:21 am 
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Gaumont's upcoming blu of Querelle will include the english version


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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 7:05 am 
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Yes's to Veronika Voss, In a Year of Thirteen Moons, Fear Eats The Soul, Fox and his Friends, Martha, with Querelle as a weird curiosity.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 6:01 pm 
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Location: NYC
Three Fassbinder double features this month at the 92YTribeca. Everything is projected in 35mm, all double features are $12 for each pair of films.

http://www.92y.org/Tribeca/Film/Overdue ... eries.aspx


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:28 am 
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solent wrote:
John Sandford's book THE NEW GERMAN CINEMA (1980) is well researched. His chapter on Fassbinder gives many filming dates and his filmography seems to be correct. As most Fassbinder freaks know various sources list his films in different order. I will now be using Sandford's which lists the major films in the following order [filming dates are in brackets].

Films [not incl. TV plays] in order of release:
LOVE IS COLDER THAN DEATH [WINTER 1969]
KATZELMACHER [8/69]
GODS OF THE PLAGUE [AUTUMN 1969]
HERR R [12/69]
RIO DAS MORTES [1/70] See the used car seller's receipt book
WHITY [4/70 - This filming date may be wrong. I have guessed it. A hotter time of the year is more probable so June to July might be more plausible, i.e. after NIKLASHAUSEN.]
NIKLASHAUSEN [5/70]
AMERICAN SOLDIER [8/70]
HOLY WHORE [9/70]
PIONEERS [11/70]
MERCHANT OF 4 SEASONS [8/71]
PETRA [1972]
WILD GAME [1972]
FEAR EATS THE SOUL [9/73]
MARTHA [EARLY AUTUMN 1973]
EFFI BRIEST [AUTUMN 1972 then, after a lengthly break due to an actor's illness etc., AUTUMN 1973]
FOX [SPRING-SUMMER 1974]
MOTHER KUSTERS [SPRING 1975]
FEAR OF FEAR [SPRING 1975]
I ONLY WANT YOU TO LOVE ME [1976]
SATAN'S BREW [1976]
CHINESE ROULETTE [1976]


As someone who is new Fassbinder, is this the proper order to watch his films? I know they are only the production dates and not the release dates.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2013 5:49 am 

Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2011 2:42 pm
has Volker Schlöndorff's baal ever come out on dvd? I'd love to see Fassbinder's performance of Baal in it! I think there is a short extract from it in one of the fassbinder documentaries but I've never seen it available anywhere.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2013 11:06 am 

Joined: Wed May 27, 2009 10:18 am
lastrade wrote:
has Volker Schlöndorff's baal ever come out on dvd? I'd love to see Fassbinder's performance of Baal in it! I think there is a short extract from it in one of the fassbinder documentaries but I've never seen it available anywhere.


Not to my knowledge. It's one I've wanted to see for a long time.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 01, 2013 9:47 am 
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I've recently started a 'Fassbinder Fest' and last night decided on Chinese Roulette. Whilst not my favourite Fassbinder, it did prove utterly involving and I found the theme of the undercurent of Nazi-ideology still imbued in post-war generations (not too dissimilar to ther Fassbinders) was dealt with very well. Two scenes particularly struck me. Firstly the ones of Margit Carstensen dressed in an olive drab shirt, with her hair tied back to accentuate her teutonic androgony, eleciting images not only of fascist rallies and the idea of national unity amongst all, both male and female, but also the later dabbling with similar imagery of groups such as the Neue Slowenische Kunst. The second scene involves an excellent use of Kraftwerk and involves Angela, Traunitz and Gabriel, which seemed to highlight the ways in which the younger or youngest generations could only feel emancipated from the shackles of older generations thorugh art and culture of their era (a modernist nod via Alain Robbe-Grillet to Fassbinder himself). Forgive me if I've missed a similar postt here, but it struck me as such a fascinating and underappreciated Fassbinder work.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 01, 2013 10:00 pm 
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Yes, it's one of my favorites, but not one you see discussed often.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 9:32 am 

Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 10:25 am
It's one of his better films, indeed. I think the point where this one collapses a bit is the ending. Fassbinder allegedly assembled everything in pretty much two weeks (as he's had some money left from his last shoot), and the ending just feels... a bit... there. But yes, it's one of his better ones.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 2:16 pm 
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Yes! Personal favorite - never realized it was underappreciated. Macha Méril's character is spellbinding, truly the heart of this film for me. Have to rewatch promptly


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2013 8:13 am 
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Underappreciated, perhaps not by Fassbinder fans, but certainly in wider film circles, I've never really heard it mentioned alongsiode his more famous works - Fear Eats the Soul, Bitter Tears etc. Very interesting point regarding Macha Méril, I must confess I didn't really pay a huge amount of interest to her character, definitely will be rectified on subsequent viewings. I first really took proper notice of her during the 'Kraftwerk scene'. Margrit Carstensen was, for me, the most beguiling on screen presence.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 13, 2013 9:37 am 

Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2006 6:36 pm
Location: Atlanta, GA
Had a weird confluence of my interest in film and the rock band The Who last night while watching Katzelmacher last night from the Early Fassbinder set. Where did Fassbinder get "Young Man Blues" for the woman to sing (in English no less) 23 minutes in?

A bit of timeline checking showed it to probably be a coincidence but an odd one for such an obscure song. Mose Allison released it as "Blues" on his Back Country Suite album in 1957. Pete Townshend heard it in 1962 and The High Numbers had it in their live set in 1964. They dropped it after that and didn't pick it up again until their 1968 summer tour. However they never played it anywhere near Germany until after the filming of Katzelmacher in August 1969 (and was it in the play version?). The Who did put out a studio recording in July 1969 on the compilation album The House That Track Built but that would even be more obscure than hearing Mose's original. The well-known recording wasn't until the release of Live At Leeds.

Don't know if any of this would interest anyone here but it's strange when these two interests collide and where else could I share it?


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 1:24 pm 
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j99 wrote:
lastrade wrote:
has Volker Schlöndorff's baal ever come out on dvd? I'd love to see Fassbinder's performance of Baal in it! I think there is a short extract from it in one of the fassbinder documentaries but I've never seen it available anywhere.
Not to my knowledge. It's one I've wanted to see for a long time.
This may make you happy.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 4:37 am 

Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 8:04 am
http://www.zweitausendeins.de/baal-zwei ... -1969.html

Baal to be released in Cinema and on DVD with "Sub: E/F.". That is what zweitausendeins says, i can not confirm from the actual disc.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 5:04 am 
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Estonian and Flemish subtitles, I reckon.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 5:06 am 
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MichaelB wrote:
Estonian and Flemish subtitles, I reckon.

Don't be daft it's Esperanto and Finnish.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 5:26 am 

Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2011 4:01 am
Amazon.de tells Untertitel: Englisch.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 6:09 am 

Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 8:04 am
NABOB OF NOWHERE wrote:
MichaelB wrote:
Estonian and Flemish subtitles, I reckon.

Don't be daft it's Esperanto and Finnish.

You are both irritating the consumer here…


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 3:46 pm 
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Location: NYC
Lincoln Center kicks off a comprehensive retrospective in late May. Schedule for Part One is up.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 7:04 pm 
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hearthesilence wrote:
Lincoln Center kicks off a comprehensive retrospective in late May. Schedule for Part One is up.

Lord only knows when or if those early TV works will get a home video release, so don't miss Bremen Freedom and Nora Helmer if you're in the vicinity. I've only seen the former, and it's pretty remarkable, with Fassbinder employing early video effects to create a look that's unique in his oeuvre (unless some even more obscure film I haven't seen did the same thing). The film is already quite hypnotic, and the effects tip it over into psychedelia.


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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 11:20 am 
Bringing Out El Duende
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Image

Can't say much for the t-shirt but the remainder of the retrospective, which kicked off Friday, should be interesting.


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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 11:49 am 
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Location: NYC
Check out the new restoration for The Merchant of Four Seasons. I saw it over the weekend and it looks beautiful, the film grain and especially the color. The film itself is also excellent - Hoberman and Sarris were both big fans of it, and it's quite possibly a masterpiece in my book.


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