Andy Warhol

Discussion and info on people in film, ranging from directors to actors to cinematographers to writers.

Moderator: DarkImbecile

Message
Author
User avatar
Antoine Doinel
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:22 pm
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Contact:

#76 Post by Antoine Doinel » Sun Aug 26, 2007 12:45 am

Amy Taubin interviews Gus Van Sant about the films of Andy Warhol.

It appears back in 1989, Universal asked Van Sant to write a script for a Warhol biopic but it ultimately was turned down by the studio. Does anyone know what Van Sant's take on Warhol was?

David Ehrenstein
Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2005 8:30 pm
Contact:

#77 Post by David Ehrenstein » Sun Aug 26, 2007 9:12 am

All I know is that River hoped Gus would cast him as Andy -- and dyed his hair white with that prospect in view.

User avatar
denti alligator
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:36 pm
Location: "born in heaven, raised in hell"

#78 Post by denti alligator » Sun Oct 21, 2007 1:21 pm

WARHOL'S WORLD
October 20 - November 11, 2007

Film was the perfect medium for Andy Warhol. A visual artist fascinated with popular culture and mass production,
Warhol was attracted to the deceptive ease of creating images with a movie camera, and he was drawn to a
medium that allowed for voyeurism and cool detachment. Turning his studio, the Factory, into an avant-garde version
of a Hollywood soundstage, Warhol created a prolific body of work between 1963 and 1968, films that are astonishingly rich in pictorial and behavioral nuance.

Organized by Chief Curator David Schwartz.
All films, including six new prints, are 16mm sound films from The Museum of Modern Art, and directed by Andy Warhol, unless noted.

Haircut #1 and Kiss
Saturday, October 20, 2:00 p.m.

The exquisitely homoerotic Haircut #1 (1963, 24 mins., silent) records a "hair-cutting salon" at Billy Name's apartment. Kiss (1963, 54 mins., silent), originally shown in weekly four-minute installments, is a series of shots of kissing couples, straight and gay.

Couch and Harlot
Saturday, October 20, 4:00 p.m.

Couch (1964, 52 mins., silent. With Gerard Malanga, Naomi Levine, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac) is one of Warhol's most explicit films, a series of erotic encounters that take place on or near the Factory's old red couch. In Harlot (1964, 66 mins.), drag queen extraordinaire Mario Montez vaguely impersonates Jean Harlow while eating banana after banana.

Blow Job and Tarzan and Jane Regained, Sort of...
Saturday, October 20, 6:30 p.m.

In Blow Job (1964, 35 mins., silent), Warhol films a young man from shoulders up, with the eponymous sexual act left to the imagination. Tarzan and Jane... (1963, 80 mins. With Naomi Levine, Taylor Mead), Warhol's first feature, is a rambling spoof in which Tarzan swings both ways and Jane jumps naked into John Houseman's swimming pool.

Screen Tests: Reel 16 and Sleep (excerpt) and Soap Opera
Sunday, October 21, 2:00 p.m.

Warhol's "screen tests" are three-minute portraits of the Factory's illustrious visitors. This 40-minute reel includes Susan Sontag, Lou Reed, and Jack Smith. Sleep (1963, 42 minute excerpt), famously known as "an eight-hour-long movie that shows nothing but a man sleeping" is in fact highly edited, made from four-minute film rolls of poet John Giorno in bed. In Soap Opera (1964, 46 mins. With Baby Jane Holzer) Warhol intercuts parodic footage of domestic dramas with actual TV commercials for products including Pillsbury Cake Mix, Easter Seals, and Beauty Set Shampoo.

PANEL DISCUSSION: The Warhol Gaze
With Callie Angell and Amy Taubin, moderated by Chief Curator David Schwartz
Sunday, October 21, 5:00 p.m.

Callie Angell, curator of the Andy Warhol Film Project, and film critic Amy Taubin will discuss the artistic significance of Warhol's films, the social and cultural milieu surrounding their production, and the history of their reception and their restoration.

Eat and Screen Test #2
Sunday, October 21, 7:00 p.m.

In the exquisitely lit Eat (1964, 35 mins., silent), Robert Indiana eats one mushroom, slowly, during nine short rolls of film which are shown out of sequence. In Screen Test #2 (1965, 66 mins.), Mario Montez gamely auditions for a starring role in a remake of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, subjecting himself to the offscreen taunting of playwright Ronald Tavel.

Empire (excerpt) and Vinyl
Saturday, October 27, 1:30 p.m.

Empire (1964, 46 minute excerpt., silent), a continuous eight-hour shot of the Empire State Building, is Warhol's ultimate meditation on duration. Long before Stanley Kubrick, Warhol adapted Anthony Burgess's novel A Clockwork Orange in Vinyl (1965, 66 mins.) with Gerard Malanga's Alex overshadowed by a silent Edie Sedgwick.

Kitchen and Beauty #2
Saturday, October 27, 4:00 p.m.

In Kitchen (1965, 66 mins.), with an absurdist script by Ronald Tavel that evokes Edward Albee and Samuel Beckett, Edie Sedgwick tends to domestic chores while being seduced. In her quintessential performance, in Beauty #2 (1965, 66 mins. New print.), Edie flirts in bed with a near-stranger while sparring verbally with an offscreen interrogator.

Camp and The Velvet Underground and Nico
Saturday, October 27, 7:00 p.m.

Camp (1965, 66 mins. With Gerard Malanga, Mario Montez, Jack Smith) is an impromptu vaudeville show conceived as a response to Susan Sontag's essay "Notes on Camp." In The Velvet Underground and Nico (1965, 55 mins.) a jam session at the Factory is interrupted by a visit from the police.

Paul Swan and Hedy
Sunday, October 28, 4:30 p.m.

In Paul Swan (1965, 66 mins.), the eponymous dancer, a contemporary of Isadora Duncan, dons elaborate costumes ("Woolworth's finest!") and tries to perform while Warhol's camera records the preparations and false starts. In Hedy (1966, 66 mins.), Mario Montez enacts scenes from the life of Hedy Lamarr, including a shoplifting arrest and plastic surgery.

Poor Little Rich Girl and I, A Man
Sunday, October 28, 7:00 p.m.

The first reel of Poor Little Rich Girl (1965, 66 mins. With Edie Sedgwick) is out of focus; the second reel, in focus, feels like a revelation: Edie smokes pot, tries on clothes, and talks on the phone. I, A Man (1967, 95 mins. With Tom Baker) follows a young man's attempted trysts with a series of women, including a staircase encounter with Valerie Solanas, the woman who shot Warhol in 1968.

DUAL PROJECTION
Outer and Inner Space and Lupe and More Milk Yvette
Saturday, November 3, 2:00 p.m.

For Outer and Inner Space (1966, 33 mins. New print.), Warhol filmed Edie Sedgwick watching herself on videotape; the result is a mesmerizing four-headed portrait. In the color Lupe (1965, 33 mins. New print.), Sedgwick reenacts the last meal and attempted suicide of Hollywood actress Lupe Velez. In More Milk Yvette (1966, 33 mins.), Mario Montez plays Lana Turner, eating lunch with her daughter and trying on sweaters while a Dylan look-alike plays harmonica.

DUAL PROJECTION
The Chelsea Girls
Saturday, November 3, 5:00 p.m.

1966, 210 mins. New print. With Ondine, Gerard Malanga, Brigid Berlin, Marie Menken, Mary Woronov, Ingrid Superstar. Music by The Velvet Underground. This epic portrait of the New York underground, played out in eight rooms of the Chelsea Hotel, had a successful commercial run, is now a monument of the 1960s avant-garde.

My Hustler and Loves of Ondine
Sunday, November 4, 2:00 p.m.

In My Hustler (1965, 66 mins. With Paul America), a male hustler is pursued by men and women alike at a Fire Island beach house. In The Loves of Ondine (1968, 85 mins. With Viva), Ondine plays a gay man who tries to go straight by staging encounters with different women.

Bufferin and Ari and Mario
Sunday, November 4, 5:00 p.m.

In Bufferin (1966, 33 mins.), poet Gerard Malanga reads from his journals, substituting names with the word "bufferin." In Ari and Mario (1966, 67 mins. New print.), Mario Montez, in bright blue drag, tries to babysit a rambunctious child who is goaded by an offscreen Warhol.

Nude Restaurant
Sunday, November 4, 7:00 p.m.

1967, 100 mins. With Brigid Berlin, Julian Burrough, Taylor Mead, Allen Midgette. Viva talks about her early sexual experiences, Taylor Mead argues with an anti-war activist, and a group of Warhol stars cavort in a restaurant in G-strings in this Summer of Love time capsule.

Since and Salvador Dali
Saturday, November 10, 2:00 p.m.

The portrait film Salvador Dali (1966, 22 mins.) was made for projection at multimedia shows. The recently restored Since (1966, 66 mins.) is a loopy reenactment of the Kennedy assassination and the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald, filmed in a colorful makeshift Factory set with Ondine as LBJ, Mary Woronov as JFK, and Ingrid Superstar as "Looney Bird" Johnson.

Bike Boy
Saturday, November 10, 4:00 p.m.

Bike Boy: 1967, 109 mins. With Joseph Spencer. A young motorcyclist has a series of erotic encounters with a series of Warhol stars, finding himself out of his depths against the witty Brigid Berlin, Ingrid Superstar, and Viva.

PREVIEW SCREENING
A Walk into the Sea: The Danny Williams Story
Director Esther Robinson in person
Saturday, November 10, 6:30 p.m.

2007, 75 mins,. Directed by Esther Robinson. Danny Williams was a gifted young filmmaker, Warhol's onetime lover, and a bright star of the Factory scene. Esther Robinson's lyrical portrait of Williams—her uncle—is an absorbing inside look at the Warhol world, a family odyssey, a revelation of a neglected filmmaker, and an inquiry into Williams' mysterious disappearance at age 27.

WORK IN PROGRESS SCREENING
Beautiful Darling
Director James Rasin in person
Saturday, November 10, 8:30 p.m.

Directed by James Rasin. Produced by Jeremiah Newton. The actress Candy Darling, born James Slattery in a Long Island suburb in 1944, became one of the main figures in Andy Warhol's circle in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and starred in the Paul Morrissey-directed films Flesh and Women in Revolt. Director James Rasin will show a half-hour selection of priceless archival and interview footage from his feature documentary in progress.

Lonesome Cowboys
Sunday, November 11, 2:00 p.m.

1968, 111 mins. New print. With Viva, Taylor Mead, Joe Dallesandro, Louis Waldron. Very loosely based on Romeo and Juliet, Lonesome Cowboys is a laconic and homoerotic satire of the Western genre starring Viva as a temptress, and filmed on a rented movie set near Tucson.

Mrs. Warhol and Sunset
Sunday, November 11, 5:00 p.m.

Warhol's 74-year-old mother plays an aging movie star in Mrs. Warhol (1966, 66 mins.); Warhol's real-life boyfriend plays her current husband. The painterly Sunset (1967, 33 mins.) with voiceover of Nico reading her poetry, was part of a series of films commissioned for a planned Chapel.

David Ehrenstein
Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2005 8:30 pm
Contact:

#79 Post by David Ehrenstein » Sun Oct 21, 2007 1:30 pm

Manohla's NYT piece is excellent, and none of the films in this program should be missed under any circumstances.

User avatar
denti alligator
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:36 pm
Location: "born in heaven, raised in hell"

#80 Post by denti alligator » Sun Oct 21, 2007 2:01 pm

I managed to convert the Raro DVD versions of Kiss and Blow Job from the 25fps (on the PAL DVD) to 16.67fps. I put them on a single DVD-R. This DVD plays fine on my laptop (PC), and on my wife's (mac), but not on my HTPC (where it plays haltingly), and I don't have a standalone DVD player that can play PAL discs (so I have no idea if they would play properly on a 'normal' machine). I am happy to share this DVD with anyone who purchased the Raro set and would like to see these films at their proper speed. In fact, I'm hoping someone will contact me (I'll send you the disc for free) so that I can have it tested on a standalone player.

Adam
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: Los Angeles CA
Contact:

#81 Post by Adam » Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:35 pm

Max von Mayerling wrote:
denti alligator wrote:
Max von Mayerling wrote:Also, it appears that Mr. Ehrenstein is correct - these are bootlegs. So said a curator at the Andy Warhol Museum circa 2004.

But is it the Warhol Museum who actually owns the rights? Isn't it the Warhol Foundation? (same thing?)

I would say that the Foundation controls the rights.

But I imagine the museum and the Foundation are pretty tight. This link suggests that the museum has some role in questions related to licensing the films, whether on their own or as a gateway to the Foundation.
From the Museum site, the Museum owns rights to the films:
In 1997, upon receiving ownership of the rights to Andy Warhol's entire film and video work from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Museum was granted the opportunity and responsibility of presenting this permanent collection of Andy Warhol's work in the most authoritative and accessible manner possible, for both a general and scholarly audiences.

The museum exhibits Warhol's film and video work on a regular basis in its theater and galleries. Films are also available for viewing for research purposes at the Museum by appointment. The museum also considers requests for licensing.
However, MOMA controls the prints for distribution & public exhibition.

Raro can put whatever it wants on the boxes; doesn't make the DVDs any more legit. And the prints all have the Museum of Modern Art card at the start or end; they would have done their telecine with it. Doesn't make the DVDs any more legit. If I were making bootlegs, I would make them as legit looking as possible. I can't tell you why the Museum hasn't decided to sue.

User avatar
Donald Trampoline
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2005 3:39 pm
Location: Los Angeles, CA

#82 Post by Donald Trampoline » Sat Sep 13, 2008 8:31 pm

denti alligator wrote:I managed to convert the Raro DVD versions of Kiss and Blow Job from the 25fps (on the PAL DVD) to 16.67fps. I put them on a single DVD-R. This DVD plays fine on my laptop (PC), and on my wife's (mac), but not on my HTPC (where it plays haltingly), and I don't have a standalone DVD player that can play PAL discs (so I have no idea if they would play properly on a 'normal' machine). I am happy to share this DVD with anyone who purchased the Raro set and would like to see these films at their proper speed. In fact, I'm hoping someone will contact me (I'll send you the disc for free) so that I can have it tested on a standalone player.

Thanks for sending it to me, denti! Yes, it plays 100% smoothly.

You appear to have nailed the correct speed as well, and it looks fantastic.

User avatar
Dadapass
Joined: Thu Oct 09, 2008 6:57 pm

Re: Andy Warhol

#83 Post by Dadapass » Sat Nov 15, 2008 2:16 am

If anyone is interested there is a 64 min. documentary on Warhols films at UbuWeb.com

This site also includes other experimental/avant-garde/underground films, sound recordings, and writings.

User avatar
perkizitore
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2008 3:29 pm
Location: OOP is the only answer

Re: Andy Warhol

#84 Post by perkizitore » Thu Nov 20, 2008 9:31 pm

Can anyone comment on the quality of this boxset?
I am particurarly interested in how the image of Flesh/Trash/Heat score against the Tartan release of the films.

User avatar
Antoine Doinel
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:22 pm
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Contact:

Re: Andy Warhol

#85 Post by Antoine Doinel » Tue Dec 30, 2008 12:37 am

Warhol interviews Spielberg.

User avatar
Antoine Doinel
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:22 pm
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Contact:

Re: Andy Warhol

#86 Post by Antoine Doinel » Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:37 am

Finally caught the massive Warhol Live exhibit at the Montreal Museum Of Fine Arts. It was wonderfully put together, and took a unique approach in using Warhol's music influences as a guide to his body of work, particularly how the approach of Cage/Cale was influential on him. Throughout the exhibit, many of Warhol's films were being played on loops that were transferred from original film elements to HD (all courtesy of his foundation), so perhaps there will be some official, restored DVDs down the line.

User avatar
Max von Mayerling
Joined: Wed Dec 22, 2004 6:02 pm
Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Re: Andy Warhol

#87 Post by Max von Mayerling » Sun Aug 09, 2009 1:56 am

I highly recommend the "13 Most Beautiful" dvd, even if you don't give 1/8th of a fuck about Dean Wareham. It's a nice package of some fine transfers of some beautiful Warhol films & you can ignore the music if you want (but, for the most part, I like it).

User avatar
Peacock
Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2008 7:47 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Andy Warhol

#88 Post by Peacock » Sun Aug 09, 2009 1:14 pm

Andy Warhol's Bad coming 21st September

User avatar
hearthesilence
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:22 am
Location: NYC

Re: Andy Warhol

#89 Post by hearthesilence » Tue May 01, 2012 1:08 pm

Rare screening of Chelsea Girls tonight at 7:30 pm at Anthology Film Archives! (It's a benefit screening so tickets are a little pricey $25.)

Screen Slate:

Tonight at Anthology Film Archives the Tenants Association of the Chelsea Hotel presents a very special screening of Chelsea Girls, perhaps Andy Warhol‘s most famous and commercial successful film—and presently, paradoxically, one of his most difficult-to-see properly given its unique double-16mm setup.

Described by Newsweek as “the Iliad of the underground,” Chelsea Girls ran continuously in New York from October 1966 through May 1967, by which time even Variety had started tracking its grosses. Its conceit is at once simple and formally complex: assemble a team of Warhol Superstars and associates and simply film improvised vignettes with them in various rooms of the famed Hotel Chelsea; using the Auricon Super-1200 camera, which shot in 33-minute loads of 16mm film, each vignette was to be presented as a single, unedited take. Warhol and co-director Paul Morrissey selected their 12 favorite reels to be presented (sometimes at random) side-by-side, two at a time, giving the film its present runtime of near 3 1/4 hours. One side is color, the other B&W; and yet the original seed of the idea was to have a dual-screen projection that was “all black” on one side, and “all white” on the other; therefore, one side represents innocence and the other darkness.

The entire shoot was fueled by methamphetamine. It’s performers include Nico, Ingrid Superstar, Mary Woronov, Gerard Malanga, Marie Menken and Mario Montez. Brigid Polk administers herself speed injections and Ondine takes confession. The Velvet Underground provides the soundtrack, not to be confused with the ballad “Chelsea Girls” by ex-VU member Nico, which also provided the title of her debut solo album released the following year. And the only performer to truly live at the hotel is poet, critic and artist René Ricard. Described by no less an authority than Wikipedia as “reclusive and famously mercurial,” he’ll be on hand tonight to discuss the production and his friendship with Warhol, which lasted from 1965 until the artist’s death. Though the Hotel Chelsea hasn’t accepted permanent residents for some time and is apparently closed for renovation at the moment, Ricard is described as a current resident.

As this is a fundraising screening, tickets run $25. And Monday, May 7, the Tenants Association returns for another screening—this time rare videos of onetime resident Bob Dylan. His biography Clinton Heylan will be in attendance for that show.

User avatar
Ashirg
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:10 am
Location: Atlanta

Re: Andy Warhol

#90 Post by Ashirg » Mon Apr 21, 2014 9:41 pm

Cars: Heartbeat City is being released by Warner Archive tomorrow (April 22)

User avatar
Emak-Bakia
Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:48 am

Re: Andy Warhol

#91 Post by Emak-Bakia » Fri Jul 25, 2014 10:43 am

The Warhol Museum is putting on what sounds like a really cool event to celebrate their 20th anniversary: 15 never publicly screened Warhol films will be shown with live musical accompaniment by Tom Verlaine, Martin Rev, Dean Wareham, Eleanor Friedberger, and Bradford Cox. It will take place in Pittsburgh, at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and UCLA. I've already got my tickets for the Pittsburgh date.


Post Reply