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 Post subject: 218 Le cercle rouge
PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2005 8:27 pm 

Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:53 pm
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Le cercle rouge

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After master thief Corey (Alain Delon), fresh out of prison, crosses paths with a notorious escapee (Gian Maria Volonté) and an alcoholic ex-cop (Yves Montand), the unlikely trio plot a heist, against impossible odds. A relentless inspector (André Bourvil) and their own pasts seal their fates. Le cercle rouge, from Jean-Pierre Melville, combines honorable antiheroes, coolly atmospheric cinematography, and breathtaking set pieces to create a masterpiece of crime cinema.

Disc Features:

- Restored, complete, uncut version, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack
- Excerpts from Cinéastes de notre temps: “Jean-Pierre Melville”
- Video interviews with assistant director Bernard Stora and Rui Nogueria, the author of Melville on Melville
- Thirty minutes of rare on-set and archival footage, featuring interviews with director Jean-Pierre Melville and stars Alain Delon, Yves Montand, and André Bourvil
- Original theatrical trailer and 2003 Rialto Pictures rerelease trailer
- PLUS: A booklet featuring essays by film critics Michael Sragow and Chris Fujiwara, excerpts from Melville on Melville, a reprinted interview with composer Eric Demarsan, and an appreciation from director John Woo

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2005 6:29 am 
Waster of Cinema
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I'm surprised that there are no messages on this brilliant film. I thought that there were many Melville/Delon fans here, no?

Anyway, I am a HUGE Melville and Delon admirer and this is a wonderful, addictive film. It has been called (as many of Mellville's films are) a "lesson in Cinema", which is, I think, refering to the fact that his films are, most certainly, "pure" Cinema and aren't simply "good" or "great" films, although Melville's films can be appeciated on that and many other levels. The plot is incredibly simple, yet the level of suspense and intrigue generated through the characters alone and not through action (just like Le Samoura�) is masterful.

By this stage in his career, Melville had pretty much perfected a beautiful style of fluid, tight pacing in his films and for this reason alone, I love Le Cercle Rouge, but it offers so much more.


Last edited by Gordon on Wed Oct 26, 2005 10:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2005 2:13 pm 
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Gordon [and anyone else], what Melville film would you recommend as his best film, and why?

I want to buy one as a sampler so i figured i might as well start with the best.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2005 3:06 pm 
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Le Samourai is one of the reasons I love Cinema. Unfortunately, it indeed seems to be owned by New Yorker (or does it?!) but the OOP French disc can still be ordered cheaply and simply thur Amazon.fr's Marketplace (They won't all ship internationally, but click on them all and just delete any sellers that won't ship to your address)

The high-bitrate, sharp, super-clean transfer is excellent, as are the ENGLISH subtitles. It will more than tide you over until we see a Criterion edition!

In the meantime, get Le Cercle Rouge and Bob le Flambeur. Both are excellent, although I prefer the BFI transfer for the former and Ginette Vincendeau's commentary is excellent.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 11, 2005 1:07 pm 
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John Woo to Redo French Boo Movies

Dark Horizons wrote:
Woo's next pic will be Paramount's remake of another Melville classic, 1970's "The Red Circle."


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2007 1:07 am 
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Just watched this film, and I certainly enjoyed it. Alain Delon has a magnetic screen presence, and exudes cool.

I was wondering if there were holdups in filming that necessitated reshoots. Either that or the weather on the road from Marseille to Paris is pretty unpredictable.

I remember back in 1996 when Mission: Impossible came out, and reading a review that marveled at de Palma's decision not to use music when Tom Cruise and Jean Reno break into the CIA (?) headquarters. But I've just discovered that both Rififi and Le Cercle Rouge had done it loooong before.

Anyway, a really good heist movie. I prefer Army of Shadows and Le Samourai, but this wasn't too shabby.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2007 6:57 pm 

Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 2:27 pm
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jbeall wrote:
I was wondering if there were holdups in filming that necessitated reshoots. Either that or the weather on the road from Marseille to Paris is pretty unpredictable.

European weather can (and often tends to) change drastically from one hour to the next. I've sat through rain, bright sunshine and cloudy skies in the last eight hours.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:16 pm 

Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: Los Angeles CA
How do people like this DVD set?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 3:03 pm 
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Adam wrote:
How do people like this DVD set?

It all depends if you like your pool table felt green or blue.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 4:38 pm 
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Color timing aside, I love the film, and recommend the DVD highly for the sheer joy of multiple viewings. The silent jewel heist is one of my all time favorite suspense scenes, and one of the peaks in Montand's career. Delon is at his most badass in the film (a feat in and of itself), and I feel its a great starting point for Melville. I assume you're unfamiliar with Melville, because if you weren't, you'd have bought this already because he's AWESOME.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 4:41 pm 
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Apart from the film, which is magnificent, the extras on the set are a good introduction to Melville and his filmmaking. Despite Le cercle rouge being a late, lesser-known Melville film, this set is probably the best point of entry for the Melville newcomer.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 7:22 pm 

Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:29 pm
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arsonfilms wrote:
Color timing aside, I love the film, and recommend the DVD highly for the sheer joy of multiple viewings. The silent jewel heist is one of my all time favorite suspense scenes, and one of the peaks in Montand's career. Delon is at his most badass in the film (a feat in and of itself), and I feel its a great starting point for Melville. I assume you're unfamiliar with Melville, because if you weren't, you'd have bought this already because he's AWESOME.

I know Melville, have the Criterion DVDs of Le Samourai and Bob Le Flambeur, and saw Le cercle rouge in a theatre (so know the film), so I guess I am really asking about the color timing and the quality of the extras. Thank you.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 9:12 pm 
Dot Com Dom
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the BFI has a fantastic commentary


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 2:51 am 
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domino harvey wrote:
the BFI has a fantastic commentary

...and more accurate colour.

(Or rather, less "accurate" but closer to Melville and Henri Decaë's intentions)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2008 3:00 pm 
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Just watched it for the first time this afternoon and really liked it. The slow pacing of the movie, the overall (and especially Delon`s) acting, the cinematography: everything was great about it.
The way the heist itself was shot was magnificent!

I`m not totally sure but I think I liked this one better than Le Samourai. Both excellent films, that`s for sure. Looking forward to the release of Le deuxieme souffle.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2008 3:34 pm 
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Supposedly they are re-making this film, and Alain Delon may have a role in it?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2008 6:17 pm 

Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 6:56 am
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While I love this film and would prefer it be left untouched, fortunately the remake is in the safe and assured hands of Johnnie To, a devotee of Melville and great crime director in his own right.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 12:40 am 

Joined: Tue Aug 12, 2008 12:37 am
Cde. wrote:
While I love this film and would prefer it be left untouched, fortunately the remake is in the safe and assured hands of Johnnie To, a devotee of Melville and great crime director in his own right.

If he was such a devotee of Melville, he would realize the original film is fine just the way it is and does not require a remake.

Additionally, I have a difficult time trusting a director who made those absurd casting choices (if IMDb is to be trusted). The whole thing stinks. How much longer before we get Army of Shadows and Le Samourai remade? And if a major US Studio has a hand in the production, which I suspect it will, and if Brett Ratner really is a producer, well that's all the proof you need.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 1:34 am 
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I though Forrest Whitaker did Le Samourai.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 9:30 am 
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No, but he homaged it in Ghost Dog. They are also remaking one of my favorite classic crime films in Rififi. It's disappointing to think people would want to mess with the classics, whats next re-make of Casablanca and Citizen Kane?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:28 am 
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psufootball07 wrote:
No, but he homaged it in Ghost Dog. They are also remaking one of my favorite classic crime films in Rififi. It's disappointing to think people would want to mess with the classics, whats next re-make of Casablanca and Citizen Kane?

You do know that Le Cercle Rouge is Melville's own version of Rififi, right?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:49 am 
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psufootball07 wrote:
It's disappointing to think people would want to mess with the classics, whats next re-make of Casablanca and Citizen Kane?

No, just remakes of Seven Samurai, Ikiru, High and Low, Stalker, and a sequel to 8 1/2.

psufootball07 wrote:
No, but [Forest Whitaker] homaged it in Ghost Dog.

Let's give Jim Jarmusch a little credit. Whitaker only starred in the thing.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 11:38 am 
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swo17 wrote:
psufootball07 wrote:
No, but [Forest Whitaker] homaged it in Ghost Dog.

Let's give Jim Jarmusch a little credit. Whitaker only starred in the thing.

Ghost Dog was Jarmusch's riff on Le Samourai with a dash of Branded to Kill thrown in, I don't see any relation to Le Cercle Rouge.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 11:56 am 
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Yes, admittedly, we are a little off topic. A few posts back, someone mentioned that Forest Whitaker had done a remake of Le Samourai.

(What is it about Le Samourai that diverts all discussion of any other Melville film back to it?)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 8:41 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 12, 2008 12:37 am
Via_Chicago wrote:
psufootball07 wrote:
No, but he homaged it in Ghost Dog. They are also remaking one of my favorite classic crime films in Rififi. It's disappointing to think people would want to mess with the classics, whats next re-make of Casablanca and Citizen Kane?

You do know that Le Cercle Rouge is Melville's own version of Rififi, right?

If I remember the interview correctly, Melville had planned on doing Le Cercle Rouge in the mid-late 1950's but Riffifi came out instead and blew his chances of doing it, so he turned to other projects instead.

And Jim Jarmusch has stated Ghost Dog is a blend of Branded to Kill and Le Samourai, his two favorite hitman movies. But it wasn't a direct remake of either, it wasn't Hollywood produced, and it didn't star Orlando Bloom and Chow Yun-Fat.


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